White Pine Report on MTSF Jun 5, 2019

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dbhguru
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White Pine Report on MTSF Jun 5, 2019

Post by dbhguru » Sun Sep 08, 2019 10:21 am

Ents,

This is posted here so I have an Internet link for white pine data in an impending scientific paper.

Bob
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The Exceptional White Pines of Mohawk Trail State Forest.pdf
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Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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bbeduhn
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Re: White Pine Report on MTSF Jun 5, 2019

Post by bbeduhn » Mon Sep 09, 2019 12:56 pm

Bob,
That's quite a fine paper! I plan to get some more extensive data and measurements on the most productive younger white pine sites this winter. There may be enough info to write an addendum for this white pine paper. Let me know specifically what info you would need.
Brian

PS I wasn't involved with the SC champ measurement. I did find a 171.4' on the East Fork of the Chattanooga, which could now be the tallest in SC, but I don't know if I'll make it back there this year to check it out.

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dbhguru
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Re: White Pine Report on MTSF Jun 5, 2019

Post by dbhguru » Tue Sep 10, 2019 8:23 am

Brian,

The story of this great species will soon be told in Ray Asselin's new video "Eastern White Pine - Rooted in American History". It promises to be as successful as his "The Lost Forests of New England". Ray is compiling a list of successful nature films that tell important stories through an important medium. We never imagined the success of Lost Forests that has developed. It is a testament to the public's thirst for substantive nature films that go beyond the typically shallow films we see today on television, that feature animals fighting.

In terms of data, it is quintessentially our NTS mission to engage in profiling a species across its full range. Continuing to gather measurements of outstanding pines can help us better tell the full story of this fabulous American species: its pre-colonial glory, colonial and post colonial exploitation, and now gradual return to its rightful place in the hierarchy of outstanding species. The eastern whites, as great as they are, cannot match the sugar pine or ponderosa for size, but nonetheless, they do us proud here in the East. And because of their fast growth that can be sustained for 150 years, they are important across the northeastern countryside to carbon sequestration. They are also, once again, very valuable as a timber species, which signals renewed exploitation and short rotations. So, the more we can tell their story, the more we be a voice for conserving pines in the 80 to 150-year age range from pre-mature harvesting. This is my current focus.

In the past, the one and only Dr. Lee Frelich has expressed interest in us publishing a paper on the maximum size that the white pine can achieve. That's still open. Unfortunately, potential NTS partners in that paper have drifted away. However, we can renew the project if enough members can participate. In terms of NTS members actively contributing data, we have Elijah Whitcomb, Erik Danielsen, Jared Lockwood, Brian Beduhn, Dale Luthringer, Doug Bidlack, Larry Tucei, John Eichholz, Jess Riddle, and Bob Leverett. From the past, we have an excellent and invaluable cache of data from Will Blozan, Matt Markworth, Rand Brown, Steve Galehouse, Mark Rouw, and a few others. But we can't have too much.

At present, it appears that we have a range of between 20 and 25 feet difference between the maximum heights from latitude 35 to 44 degrees with heights increasing from north to south. Conversely, we have see that pattern slightly reversed for overall volumes. Not sure.

In terms of volume modeling, we have our reticle-based methods and then there are the statistical methods used in the FS's vast FIA system. Here is a companions between our direct measuring and the statistical models.
ComparisonNSTvsFIAVolumes.png
You'll note that the two methods yield results that are fairly close. I once thought the opposite, but I was wrong. It has taken me a long time to decode the complex statistical models used by forestry academics. But they're proving to be much better than they initially appeared. But then we'd hope so. The FIA models deal with stand-grown white pines that are much more uniform in shape, allowing for statistical averages to work.

Despite our small membership and the understandable changing interests of members, NTS can still be an important contributor to projects and papers that require accurate tree measurement.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Larry Tucei
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Re: White Pine Report on MTSF Jun 5, 2019

Post by Larry Tucei » Fri Sep 13, 2019 10:43 am

Bob-

Fantastic write up on the White Pines of Mohawk. I'm glad to have helped contribute some data on the Whites in Wisconsin.
I and Paul Jost have both measured White Pine to over 150' in the great grove of northern Wisconsin -Cathedral Pines.
One of only a few remaining Old Growth Pine stands in Wisconsin.
I measured many Pines there the two tallest were 154.8', 12'2" CBH and 156.2', CBH 10' back in 2012.

I hope to get up to Mohawk and see it for myself in the near future.

Larry

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bbeduhn
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Re: White Pine Report on MTSF Jun 5, 2019

Post by bbeduhn » Fri Sep 13, 2019 11:12 am

Bob,
I'll plan on getting some volume measurements as well as more detailed heights and girths for the best of the best young white pine sites that I've recently discovered. I'll bring binocs and get accurate ages on the largest ones as well. It's truly incredible how 50-60 year old pines can grow so tall! Hopefully, I'll be able to get back to what could be the new South Carolina height champ white pine.
Brian

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