Monica's Pine

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dbhguru
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Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Monica's Pine

Post by dbhguru » Mon Jul 01, 2019 3:30 pm

Ents,

I just have to brag a bit on Monica's Pine in our back lot. I re-measured it using the Impulse 200LR and got 140.26 feet. I had not expected it to break 140 until next growing season. It is 7.7 feet in girth, and has a reticles trunk volume of 280 ft^3. Total trunk and limb volume is approximately 300 ft^3. This amounts to 1.7 regular tons of carbon or approximately 1.6 metric tons. Big tree points are a modest 243, but this attractive pine is ours and only 87 feet for our back door. Meet Monica's Pine.
MonicasPine-a.jpg
Our tall tree tally by height class is:

No. >=140 >=130. >=120 >=100
1 4 8 20

This count applies to half an acre. The Broad Brook corridor of which we are part of has around 30 trees over 130 feet, three of which are 140s.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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DougBidlack
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Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 4:14 pm

Re: Monica's Pine

Post by DougBidlack » Tue Jul 02, 2019 6:14 am

Bob,

very cool to have such a nice tree out your back door. Could you remind us when you first measured this tree and how tall (and big around) the tree was back then. This would give us better context for why you might have thought this pine wouldn't break 140' so soon. Also, any guesstimate as to the age?

Doug

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dbhguru
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Re: Monica's Pine

Post by dbhguru » Tue Jul 02, 2019 10:09 am

Doug,

I think I began measuring Monica's pine the summer of 2006. It would have been around 130 feet then. My records for back then are poor, but if my memory serves me, that's what I recall. I think the girth was at most 7 feet and I believe may have been like 6' 11 inches. Age, well judging by other trees in the vicinity, between 110 and 120 years.

What makes this tree especially difficult to analyze is that the highest leader has changed over the course of years. There are several competing tops. I'll present them in a future post. The tree is a challenge to measure. I need to get on the opposite side of the house in our driveway to see the tops. Then I have to work my way around the house, establishing new level points, each a potential source of error. Nothing like repeated sampling.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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