Catching up

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4496
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Catching up

Post by dbhguru » Thu Jul 04, 2019 12:42 pm

Larry,

Cherrybark would be soooo cool, but in West Virginia? Plus, it didn't quite match other cherry bark's I've seen. Guess I'll have to drive back down to WVA and get lots more photos.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4496
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Catching up

Post by dbhguru » Thu Jul 04, 2019 3:11 pm

Ents,

Another important tool for us to keep in mind is our tree measurement database at Virginia Tech. John Peterson at Va Tech has been gracious, giving us support. Using. the database is another way we can guard against loss of valuable measurements. Just sayin.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

User avatar
bbeduhn
Posts: 1154
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 4:23 pm

Re: Catching up

Post by bbeduhn » Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:25 pm

I thought I saw a few post oak leaves in the first photo, before I read Larry's post. I would have said cuke by the bark alone. That's a rather large post oak if it is.

User avatar
a_blooming_botanist
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2016 10:09 pm

Re: Catching up

Post by a_blooming_botanist » Mon Jul 22, 2019 11:50 am

Esteemed Leader Bob and other NTS members,

As previously mentioned, it is a huge relief for me that Ed was able to revive the BBS after a period of it being down. However scattered the information may be, this site hosts data that can’t be found anywhere else. This is where I go when I want to get a sense for how a species performs in other parts of its range, the new discoveries of other tree hunters, and to learn and discuss instruments and methods. So, thank you once again Ed for your persistence.

Last month I joined Bob and Monica on a two-week road trip to TN and VA, including two tree measuring workshops. The participants in both locations were great, as were our hosts Drs. Sharon Jean-Philippe at UT Knoxville and Eric Wiseman at Virginia Tech.

After the TN workshop the three of us stayed in a cabin in Townsend until it was time to move north to VA. The scenery there was out of this world, with an amazing display of clouds rolling across the landscape, seen in the photo below.
Front to back: Misty, awesome cloud wave, Rich Mountain.
Front to back: Misty, awesome cloud wave, Rich Mountain.
By the way, we named the tall white pine on the ridge Misty.

Bob’s note on the diversity down there is absolutely correct. That was one feature of the Smoky Mountains that really blew me away. In the area surrounding the cabins where we were staying we noted 41 species of woody plants, and another 63 species in our daily expeditions. We included some species that might surprise you, but hey, we don’t discriminate. Even sub-shrubs are woody. In any case, there is an impressive display of botanical diversity there, including most of the trees and shrubs that I know from New England plus many new taxa!

Bob,

Great news about Monica’s pine reaching 140’! Last March I measured a white pine in Pelham with Brother Ray at 141.6’. It’s at an elevation of 381 ft, which I think still qualifies it as in the valley. Is that one included in your list of CT River Valley 140’+?

Jared

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4496
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Catching up

Post by dbhguru » Mon Jul 22, 2019 8:27 pm

Jared,

No, I haven’t included the Pelham tree. Thanks for reminding me. In terms of valley elevation, I’m open to suggestions on how to define the boundaries. The Pelham Hills have elevations in the 1,000 to 1,300 foot range. Does the tree grow on a building ridge line?

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

User avatar
a_blooming_botanist
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2016 10:09 pm

Re: Catching up

Post by a_blooming_botanist » Tue Jul 23, 2019 2:04 pm

dbhguru wrote:Jared,

No, I haven’t included the Pelham tree. Thanks for reminding me. In terms of valley elevation, I’m open to suggestions on how to define the boundaries. The Pelham Hills have elevations in the 1,000 to 1,300 foot range. Does the tree grow on a building ridge line?

Bob
Bob,

The tree is growing about 2/3 mile from the Amherst line along Amethyst Brook on private property. Here's a snapshot of a Google map with a pin dropped in the tree's location.
Pelham Pine.png
One way to define the valley would be as the Connecticut River watershed. That would extend the boundary from the lowland terrain to the highlands where the headwaters of streams that flow into the CT River are. Here's a map showing the watershed in green.
CT River Watershed.png
Jared

Post Reply

Return to “Massachusetts”