Kendrick Woods, SNP (OH)

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Rand
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Kendrick Woods, SNP (OH)

Post by Rand » Fri Jan 23, 2015 11:49 pm

This nature preserve encompasses the largest contiguous block of woods in a sea of corn and soybeans Allen County (~140 acres). It is located along two tributaries of the Auglaze River. The site is largely flat, with the two stream valleys incised perhaps 10' lower than the surrounding terrain. The northward flowing stream (six mile creek) is a stream proper, while the eastern flowing stream quickly degenerates into more of shallow slough.
kendrick-arial.png
Oak Grove in blue dashes
Oak Grove in blue dashes
The slopes and flatlands surrounding the streams are populated by a more upland assemblage of oaks; Mainly red, black, and white oaks and pignut & shagbark hickory. The benches along Six Mile Creek have more typically riparian species such as green ash (Dead), honey locust, American Elm, & Pin oak. The eastern flowing slough had many Bur Oaks growing in it. While these were the tallest trees in the woods, the trees themselves looked fairly young and didn't top much over 2' dbh. Indeed most of the trees didn't look much over 100 years old, especially in the east-west trending 'arm'. This is pretty typical condition for most woodlots in NW Ohio. However, in the the southern arm there is a grove of old growth white oaks growing on the upland flats just above Six Mile Creek. While they had big flattoped, cauliflower-like crowns and slow tapering boles denoting great age, their sizes in the grand scheme of things wasn't terribly impressive. The impression I got was the the trees had reached the best potential that could be afforded by a relatively poor site. Of the half dozen or so big trees in the grove, two had died in the relatively recent past. A few large pin oaks grew down in the flat bench beside the incised stream.
Kendrick-h.png
11' 10" x 106' White Oak
11' 10" x 106' White Oak
11' 7" x 95.5' White Oak (Dead)
11' 7" x 95.5' White Oak (Dead)
11' 5" x 101' White Oak
11' 5" x 101' White Oak
Honestly I was a little bummed by the site. The aged presence projected by the white oaks, made them seem larger than they really were. The park rangered roosting in the parking lot and giving me the evil as I entered the trail system tempered my usual off trail adventurism, so I didn't explore much in depth.

I notice this exceptionally large larch tree in yard just east of I-75 on the south side of Lima. A hasty, long range laser shot yielded a height of ~70'
~ 70' Larch
~ 70' Larch

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bbeduhn
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Re: Kendrick Woods, SNP (OH)

Post by bbeduhn » Wed Jan 28, 2015 8:59 am

Rand,
How dare you have the gall to enter a trail system! Trails should languish and never be used, especially by the evil treehunters.

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DougBidlack
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Re: Kendrick Woods, SNP (OH)

Post by DougBidlack » Wed Jan 28, 2015 11:58 am

Rand,

it's interesting to see a pin oak as your tallest species especially when you have a number of pignut hickories and northern red oaks present. I know much of Ohio is especially good territory for pin oak but have you ever seen this before?

Doug

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Rand
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Re: Kendrick Woods, SNP (OH)

Post by Rand » Wed Jan 28, 2015 2:57 pm

Doug,

I think that is just an artifact of just how few large trees there were. They were clustered in the small area I circled and I measured almost every one. Perhaps the other species succumbed to old age and/or selective logging? The second growth, however, had a far more balanced species composition, and was dramatically younger than the old trees.

And I should mention that I didn't get to the high LIDAR spot up by the parking lot because of the ranger.

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DougBidlack
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Re: Kendrick Woods, SNP (OH)

Post by DougBidlack » Thu Jan 29, 2015 12:47 pm

Rand,

So there may be some taller trees that you just haven't measured yet?

Also, are you aware of any other sites where pin oak is tallest? Even if it may just be temporary.

Doug

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Rand
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Re: Kendrick Woods, SNP (OH)

Post by Rand » Thu Jan 29, 2015 8:16 pm

DougBidlack wrote:Rand,

So there may be some taller trees that you just haven't measured yet?
Yeah. I just measured the small grove of trophy trees. I wasn't able to do a thorough survey at all.
Also, are you aware of any other sites where pin oak is tallest? Even if it may just be temporary.
Doug
Generally they do pretty well on the wet clayey flats of NW Ohio, but are less common than green or and swamp white oak. I see them most commonly on second growth sites, but seem to be kinda rare on old growth sites. On the other hand, there are so few old growth sites in NW Ohio that it is hard to tell. My gut feeling is that ash grows taller, but swamp white oak lives longer and gets bigger. I don't think I've surveyed enough of their prime habitat to give you a good answer though.

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DougBidlack
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Re: Kendrick Woods, SNP (OH)

Post by DougBidlack » Thu Jan 29, 2015 11:16 pm

Rand,

I was just wondering because the only place in Michigan that I've seen where pin oak might have half a chance is Belle Isle which is in the Detroit River, quite flat and where pin oak is the dominant species. I thought maybe other lake plain areas in southeastern Michigan and northern Ohio might be possibilities as well. Even though pin oak is the most common species on Belle Isle, I doubt that it will be taller than some of the other species like Shumard oak, swamp white oak, bur oak, northern red oak or bitternut hickory among others.

Doug

DwainSchroeder
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Re: Kendrick Woods, SNP (OH)

Post by DwainSchroeder » Sat Jan 31, 2015 11:15 pm

I've been to Kendrick woods a few times and I agree it looks like there must have been a lot of past disturbances there - occasional logging and maybe some pasturing. I recall seeing some large trees in the woods that had some large lower limbs and stubs. This is an indicator that those trees grew up in a more open situation.

I know of a few tracts of woods near where I live that were fenced in and used for pastures. We did it on the farm I grew up on in the 1960s, for just a few years. It wasn't very intensive, I believe we had about 10 (approximately 400 lb) calves in the 8 acre woods during the summer months. There really isn't much grass available in a good woods so there's not much for the cattle to eat. We had to feed them some extra hay and grain. If you pasture a woods for too many years I believe the woods will gradually give way to a lower tree population without any small replacement trees, not a good thing for a woods, especially if you want some ongoing quality timber potential.

One interesting thing about Kendrick Wood is that there is a sulfur water spring there. The water flows out of the ground and creates a mini-swamp as it drains away to a nearby creek. The area around the spring doesn't seem to be too badly affected by all of that sulfur water. Trees and vegetation are growing, but there are no large trees close to the spring.

Dwain

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Rand
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Re: Kendrick Woods, SNP (OH)

Post by Rand » Sun Feb 01, 2015 5:32 pm

DwainSchroeder wrote:
If you pasture a woods for too many years I believe the woods will gradually give way to a lower tree population without any small replacement trees, not a good thing for a woods, especially if you want some ongoing quality timber potential.
My grandfather had a small woodlot in the middle of his pasture that was beat to death, for what I can surmise, was most of the 20th century. He was quite adamant that if you wanted to have good timber, never pasture a woods. Best I can tell, the heavy hoof traffic damages the root system and compacts the soil, stunting the trees and causing decay. Anyway. Like you said, no small trees. Sometime in the mid 80's he stopped raising sheep, and started letting the trees grow back. Walnut and Oak are great pioneer species in the heavy grass and goldenrod. In the damper spots lots of elm and ash grew back. The elm got wiped out in the mid 90's and the ash succumbed just in the last 3 years to the Ash borer. I joked to my dad what great timber the remaining oaks and walnuts will make in 150 years. He just sorta snorted, and said the property will be back to back houses by then (the old farm is 1/2 mile from the village limits). <Sigh> too true.

Anyway, you ever measure those fat bald cypresses in front of the VFW in Columbus Grove? I occasionally ride my bike out there when visiting my parents, and they always strike me as exceptional for Ohio.

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Don
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Re: Kendrick Woods, SNP (OH)

Post by Don » Sun Feb 01, 2015 6:29 pm

While it's different region and probably different forest type, your comment made me think of the research on advance oak regeneration that I was assisting my grad committee chair on, in Massachusetts (watershed of Quabbin reservoir). Comparisons were being made between fenced enclosures and unfenced enclosures regarding advanced oak regeneration. When deer (and for that matter, other browsers) were fenced out, there was significant difference in forest regeneration. The deer browsed everything young, down to the ground...very heavy deer presence, primarily due to the "Bambi effect" on the public, they wanted no hunting, harm to come to the deer. Meanwhile, oaks developed significant root systems, and when allowed browse-free opportunities, they took off like crazy with decades old, well-established root systems supporting their rapid growth into unfettered understory.
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