TrekEast

Discussions related to the issues of forest preservation and environmental conservation

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TrekEast Blog 22 Congaree Swamp SC

Post by edfrank » Fri Apr 29, 2011 6:50 pm

TrekEast Blog 22 Congaree Swamp SC
Submitted by John Davis on Thu, 2011-04-28 16:45
http://wildlandsnetwork.org/trekeast/bl ... e-swamp-sc

Congaree Swamp National Park, April 9-10, 2011
For seekers of big old trees, central South Carolina’s Congaree Swamp has almost mythical stature. To visit its 11,000 acres of old-growth sweetgum, bald cypress, tupelo, and loblolly pine forest with “Dean of Conservation Biology” John Terborgh (as another great conservation biologist, Michael Soulé, has called him), along with other leading naturalists, was surely a high point in TrekEast and an honor I’ll never forget.


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We spent two days paddling and walking along Cedar Creek, the Congaree River and the boardwalk out from the National Park visitors’ center. Those two days were richer than I can describe, but for starters: Champion snake-spotter Ron Sutherland found nearly 50 snakes, including dozens of water snakes, five cottonmouths, a rough green snake, and a black rat snake. Keith Bowers, President of the Wildlands Network and founder of the leading ecological restoration company, Biohabitats, taught us some hydrology and told us of restoration work on various streams in the East, and confirmed that many waterways in the Southeast are still relatively intact and can serve as the first strands in a restored Eastern Wildway.
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"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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TrekEast Blog 29 Sassafras Mountain and Jocassee Gorges

Post by edfrank » Thu May 19, 2011 7:31 pm

TrekEast Blog 29 Sassafras Mountain and Jocassee Gorges
Submitted by John Davis on Thu, 2011-05-19 20:18

Mountains and Gorges on the Border
April 30-May 1, 2011
The mountains of the Carolinas bear many scars. They have suffered heavy logging, road and dam building, acid rain, chestnut blight and other exotic species invasions, exurban sprawl, and increasingly a climate destabilized by human industry. Yet still they abide, and their patches of original forest and swaths of recovering forest provide homes for some of our country’s richest concentrations of trees, wildflowers, mosses, salamanders, crayfish, and mammals.

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http://wildlandsnetwork.org/trekeast/bl ... see-gorges

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"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Re: TrekEast

Post by edfrank » Mon May 23, 2011 6:23 pm

Wildlands Network
May 23, 2011


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What do you eat when you burn calories and need to consume about 6000 to keep going and do not have access to quality food?
Listen to John's latest audio blog and find out just what he had to eat for the calorie count alone.

http://t.co/VJlXZMP


TrekEast Audio Blogs:
through Chirbit
chirbit.JPG
chirbit.JPG (10.71 KiB) Viewed 1009 times
http://www.chirbit.com/trekeast

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"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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edfrank
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Kentucky's Daniel Boone National Forest

Post by edfrank » Sun May 29, 2011 9:23 pm

Kentucky's Daniel Boone National Forest
TrekEast John Davis

Kentucky's Daniel Boone National Forest has great scenery and big trees, where not cut. yfrog.com/gzpvcvnj yfrog.com/gyynawxj


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"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Re: TrekEast

Post by edfrank » Mon May 30, 2011 1:02 pm

TrekEast Blog 30 Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest and Joyce Kilmer-Slickrock Wilderness
Submitted by testuser1 on Sun, 2011-05-29 22:14
http://wildlandsnetwork.org/trekeast/bl ... wilderness

Beauty Tinged with Sadness
Photos by: Kim Nix
May 5, 2011
Joyce Kilmer Forest is a bittersweet experience. Sweetness describes the towering hardwoods, especially the tulip poplars big enough to shade an elk herd. Bitter is the sight and the fate of the once mighty hemlocks, victims of more human meddling, and rapidly succumbing to the hemlock wooly adelgid, an exotic insect which people brought here from Eurasia on nursery stock.

Whether rightly or wrongly, but decidedly shockingly, the United States Forest Service saw fit to dynamite down the big hemlocksnags. Forest Service officials probably judged the standing dead trees to be potential hazards to pedestrians – thousands per year walk the loop trails of this famous old-growth grove; and apparently these officials reckoned dynamite more consistent with the Wilderness Act and more akin to natural disturbance than would be chainsaws.
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"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Re: TrekEast: Blue Ridge and Black Mountains

Post by edfrank » Wed Jun 01, 2011 6:10 pm

TrekEast Blog 32 Asheville to Wild Acres
Submitted by John Davis on Tue, 2011-05-31 19:09
http://wildlandsnetwork.org/trekeast/bl ... wild-acres

Blue Ridge and Black Mountains
Action Needed: Forest Service officials, such as those of the Pisgah National Forest, where Rob and I had been admiring the old-growth, need to be pressured into permanently protecting all remaining old-growth stands and roadless areas. The groves Rob and I visited are in a big roadless area that has no formal protection. It ought to be protected as Wilderness, and ultimately, the Curtis Creek Road ought to be converted to a footpath and the Wilderness Area greatly enlarged. The same holds true for old-growth and roadless areas throughout the National Forest system: all ought to be given permanent protection, as Wilderness Areas whenever possible. Groups to support in these National Forest protection efforts include the Southern Appalachian Forest Coalition, The Wilderness Society, Wild South, the John Muir Project, and the Center for Biological Diversity. Gaining full protection for all National Forests and reconnecting them to other protected lands will be a major move toward successful establishment of Eastern and Western Wildways. Also support arboreal restoration efforts such as those of the American Chestnut Foundation. Chestnuts are as integral to Appalachian landscapes as are bears and songbirds and wildflowers and trout.
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"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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4,500 miles into TrekEast - video

Post by edfrank » Sat Jul 16, 2011 1:33 am

Wildlands Network
‎4,500 miles into TrekEast...watch what John has to say about his journey so far.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0F14FErMdo&feature=player_embedded

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"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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