Familiar eastern trees which range into the tropics

General discussions of forests and trees that do not focus on a specific species or specific location.

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RyanLeClair
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Re: Familiar eastern trees which range into the tropics

Post by RyanLeClair » Wed Jan 11, 2012 6:51 pm

The Nothofagus family fits into this conversation...very Beech-like trees (they were once considered to be part of Fagaceae) that live in the tropics.

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tsharp
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Re: Familiar eastern trees which range into the tropics

Post by tsharp » Wed Jan 11, 2012 10:43 pm

tsharp wrote:Neil, Kouta,NTS: Neil wrote:
...some people think some of these species were huddled off the shores of New Jersey, for example, on the part of the continental shelf that was above sea level during full glaciation. I think there is only some scattered evidence of this.
Could this be some of the "scattered" evidence to which you are referring?
Red pine may also have survived during the glacial period in refugia off the present coastline of the eastern seaboard in nonglaciated islands and extensions of the mainland.
This quote above was from: After the Ice Age: the return of life to glaciated North America. Pielou E. C. 1991,University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Neil if you find time to find some more literature on this subject I am sure many on this board would be interested.
Turner Sharp

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KoutaR
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Re: Familiar eastern trees which range into the tropics

Post by KoutaR » Thu Jan 12, 2012 7:32 am

RyanLeClair wrote:The Nothofagus family fits into this conversation...very Beech-like trees (they were once considered to be part of Fagaceae) that live in the tropics.
Ryan,

Indeed, half of the Nothofagus species are native to tropical highlands of New Guinea and New Caledonia. The rest are native to the Southern Hemisphere and are now dominants in parts of southern New Zealand, Tasmania and southern Chile and adjacent Argentina. In the south, the Nothofagus populations fluctuated with climate changes just like the temperate forests of the north, escaping to refugia at unfavorable times.

Kouta

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Neil
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Re: Familiar eastern trees which range into the tropics

Post by Neil » Fri Jan 13, 2012 8:38 pm

Red pine may also have survived during the glacial period in refugia off the present coastline of the eastern seaboard in nonglaciated islands and extensions of the mainland.
This quote above was from: After the Ice Age: the return of life to glaciated North America. Pielou E. C. 1991,University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Neil if you find time to find some more literature on this subject I am sure many on this board would be interested.
Turner Sharp
that is a good source, Turner. I have a paleo expert coming to visit next week. i see if there is new news.

neil

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Lucas
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Re: Familiar eastern trees which range into the tropics

Post by Lucas » Wed Jan 16, 2019 7:01 pm


Click on image to see its original size

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1554361 ... 282892540/

Mexican Beech. A rare tree.

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... 8qk7xk1jlY

A good paper on it.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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