Back to the Incomparable Adirondacks

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4484
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Back to the Incomparable Adirondacks

Post by dbhguru » Sun May 22, 2016 1:16 pm

Elijah,

To your list and what I recently reported , we can add:

Sharon Springs and a 130.5-foot Norway Spruce on private property.
Cathedral Pines Adirondacks - white pine - 149.2 feet (once over 150)
Kaaterskill Falls Catskills white ash - 143+ feet
Vanderbilt Estate Hyde Park - tuliptree to 155 feet, A. sycamore to 136 (if I remember correctly)
Peru NY city park, E. cottonwood at 132 feet tall
Plattsburgh NY E. cottonwood at approx. 134 feet (probably over-measured by 2 to 3 feet, but above 130.

I'll dig up more complete information later. This is off the top of my head. It follows the criteria: white pine and tuliptee 140 feet or more; all other species 130 feet or more.

I think Erik must have half a dozen additional sites to add to the above.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

User avatar
Erik Danielsen
Posts: 857
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 5:46 pm

Re: Back to the Incomparable Adirondacks

Post by Erik Danielsen » Sun May 22, 2016 3:51 pm

As of now I've got-

Leolyn Woods, Lilydale (White Pine, Hemlock)
Oakwood Cemetery, East Aurora (Norway Spruce)
Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan (Tuliptree, Chestnut Oak, Red Oak)
Welwyn Preserve, Long Island (Tuliptree)
Shu Swamp Preserve, Long Island (Tuliptree)
Tiffany Creek Preserve, Long Island (Tuliptree)

There are two sites with high potential in the Bronx, some possibilities in Queens, and certainly additional sites (and non-tuliptree 130s) on Long Island. I'm expecting Westchester County to offer some serious tall trees, both Tuliptree and White Pine, as well as Norway Spruce... I had the chance to eyeball, but not measure, some really tall stuff. A lot of that is likely to present access issues similar to the stuff in the Catskills, but there are spots you can measure trees on private property from the road, including a streamside terrace with sycamores that look likely to break 130, at minimum. Getting further up the Hudson Valley just promises more. This fall and winter should be pretty exciting!

User avatar
ElijahW
Posts: 824
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:04 pm

Re: Back to the Incomparable Adirondacks

Post by ElijahW » Sun May 22, 2016 6:18 pm

Nice, fellas. Kaaterskill slipped my mind, as did the Cathedral Pines. Adding Lucien Morin County Park from today makes at least 28 sites. I expect the list to be heavily Eastern NY, with most exceptions limited to sites with plenty of topographical relief, offering protection from the weather.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

morgan
Posts: 103
Joined: Tue Sep 17, 2013 9:34 am

Re: Back to the Incomparable Adirondacks

Post by morgan » Mon Oct 16, 2017 12:11 pm

Interesting discovery regarding tuliptrees in the Adirondacks (or close to them).

Yaddo mansion in Saratoga Springs has 2 tuliptrees around 100 feet high, that were obviously planted when the mansion was built in the late 19th century, that are propagating very abundantly. I previously thought the reason that Eastern NY has no tuliptrees north of the Catskills was because it was too cold for them. Apparently not, as I found a section of woods on the Yaddo estate, near the parking lot, where hundreds of seedling and sapling tulips were growing, and trees of 20 or 30 feet high, obviously offspring of the 2 mature ones. I dug one small seedling up yesterday for my house and will be going back in the spring to get more.

I guess the reason for the lack of tuliptrees in Northeastern NY state is they just haven't reached here yet post-glacier, as they grow in western NY in places with harsh winters and farther north in latitude. I don't ever expect any to grow in the higher Adirondacks though. Saratoga Springs is only around 250 feet elevation.

Yaddo is open to the public every day and is quite an interesting place. Huge stone mansion with garden and arboretum.

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4484
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Back to the Incomparable Adirondacks

Post by dbhguru » Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:33 pm

Morgan,

I think I missed something. Where is the reference to tuliptrees in or very near the Adirondack Park? Elijah has found some dillies growing near Rochester, but once outside the influence of the great lakes, their presence disappears in that area - I think.

I think we're seeing a rising population of tuliptree seedings north of where we would have seen them 15 years ago. I see that occurring in western Massachusetts as well as New York.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

morgan
Posts: 103
Joined: Tue Sep 17, 2013 9:34 am

Re: Back to the Incomparable Adirondacks

Post by morgan » Wed Oct 18, 2017 3:59 pm

The title of the thread was misleading. I thought we were talking about the Adirondacks.

Another tuliptree in or near the Adirondacks is in downtown Saratoga, on south broadway, in front of the Subway sandwich joint. It's about 25 years old I guess and obviously planted there. Guessing 8 inch diameter and telephone pole height.

Other tuliptrees in the Adirondacks are on my property, since I live in the Adirondacks. I planted them here and they are doing well.

User avatar
ElijahW
Posts: 824
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:04 pm

Re: Back to the Incomparable Adirondacks

Post by ElijahW » Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:43 pm

Morgan,

North of I90 in NY, the farthest east I’ve seen tulips naturally growing is Little Falls. Planted trees in Fonda and Ballston Spa have done very well, though they’re still a ways south of the Adirondacks. A yard in Fonda also holds two beautiful Cucumber magnolias, well out of their native range.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

User avatar
Erik Danielsen
Posts: 857
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 5:46 pm

Re: Back to the Incomparable Adirondacks

Post by Erik Danielsen » Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:48 pm

Morgan, perhaps your post recalls a disagreement about northern limits on Liriodendron from a previous thread, and you were looking for an Adirondacks-oriented thread to further explore the subject within? While this thread is originally about a specific trip Bob made to the dacks (in that light, the title is fully appropriate), the subject of tuluptree growing further north perhalps merits its own discussion thread, which perhaps you could start.

User avatar
ElijahW
Posts: 824
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:04 pm

Re: Back to the Incomparable Adirondacks

Post by ElijahW » Wed Oct 18, 2017 7:51 pm

Erik, Bob, Morgan,

The last few posts really don't belong in this thread. I goofed up in replying to Morgan's post here. It does belong elsewhere.

Bob,

On a separate note, I've been looking closely at your first photo in this thread with Monica and the big pine, and now I'm sure it's the same one I remeasured this July at 150'6" x 13'3". Your photo is taken from the side opposite my tripod setup. If you go a few yards up the hill to the west, you'll find the 154'+ pine. It's funny that I missed the resemblance for so long. Oops!

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

Post Reply

Return to “New York”