Crane Forest

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Larry Tucei
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Crane Forest

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Apr 29, 2014 8:33 am

Old White Oak from Crane Forest to be used for restoration of USS Constitution in 2014-2018. http://www.noodls.com/view/CFB135FB643C ... 1393611587 http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=66594 http://www.wlwt.com/news/indiana-trees- ... s/24815584
USS-Constitution-jpg.jpg
Nearly three dozen white oak trees have been harvested in Indiana in preparation of planned repairs to the Boston-based U.S.S. Constitution.

The 35 white oaks harvested at a naval facility in Crane, Ind., will be used to replace deteriorated hull planking and supporting structures called "knees" on Old Ironsides. The dry-docking and repair is planned to take through 2018.

The white oak matches the warship's original construction material. It comes from a tract of land located at the Naval Surface Warfare Center known as "Constitution Grove," 25,000 acres that have supplied the majority of the white oak required for repair work since the 1970s.

About 12 percent of U.S.S. Constitution's wood is original. The ship's caretaker says the keel, the bottom frames, and the bottom 13 planks of the hull have never had to be replaced.
Larry
The Constitution was built in 1797. It is the world's oldest commissioned warship still afloat. http://www.inwoodlands.org/forest-manag ... nswc-cran/

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Rand
Posts: 1217
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 9:25 pm

Re: Crane Forest

Post by Rand » Tue Apr 29, 2014 10:47 am

Kind of a sad commentary in the overall deterioration of the timber quality in the country:
For the upcoming repairs, most hull planks will be 30 to 40 feet long and six inches thick, and must have no defects, making them not only unique to handle, but very difficult to find, according to Murphy.

"There's no market for sawn logs this long, except for maintaining the handful of wooden tall ships in the world," said Murphy.

"It's really something to bring in craftsmen to work on something like this," said Demilt. "For the four years of this repair availability, we'll hopefully add 20 wood workers and ship builders to our normal 25-person workforce. But most will have never even seen a 40-foot plank, much less worked with one. There will be some on-the-job learning to do something like this."
(From Larry's second link: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=66594)

This big a deal for just one ship? Much less entire navies that the great powers at the time used to field.

Me thinks Joe has a point about pervasive mismanagement of timber resources.

Joe

Re: Crane Forest

Post by Joe » Wed Apr 30, 2014 12:05 pm

Rand wrote:Kind of a sad commentary in the overall deterioration of the timber quality in the country:
For the upcoming repairs, most hull planks will be 30 to 40 feet long and six inches thick, and must have no defects, making them not only unique to handle, but very difficult to find, according to Murphy.

"There's no market for sawn logs this long, except for maintaining the handful of wooden tall ships in the world," said Murphy.

"It's really something to bring in craftsmen to work on something like this," said Demilt. "For the four years of this repair availability, we'll hopefully add 20 wood workers and ship builders to our normal 25-person workforce. But most will have never even seen a 40-foot plank, much less worked with one. There will be some on-the-job learning to do something like this."
(From Larry's second link: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=66594)

This big a deal for just one ship? Much less entire navies that the great powers at the time used to field.

Me thinks Joe has a point about pervasive mismanagement of timber resources.
Knot free, "clean" lumber, especially 40' long, is hard to come by. Such trees can be grown by foresters IF they TRY. One Mass. forester, Dr. Alan Page, a Mass. forester, who has been a forester for something like 50 years, planted some white pine early in his career, and pruned the best at the right time. I've heard he recently sold some of that knot free pine for a fantastic price- especially since he could prove they were knot free. It's good economics for landowners and foresters with a long view. And because he kept the forest thinned- optimally, those trees grew very fast. I've never seen his pine forests but I've been told by other foresters that they are very nice indeed- at least , in terms of commercial forest mgt.--- he's not the type likely to let any grow into very large, old specimens. He would consider that a waste- an unfortunate attitude, but-- he deserves points for doing such wonderful forestry on his land.
Joe

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Rand
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Re: Crane Forest

Post by Rand » Wed Apr 30, 2014 3:09 pm

Joe,

Reminds me of a rather nasty anecdote I came across in my reading. A guy bought some beat up timber property in the pacific northwest. Put a decade and more into cleaning up all the old slash, and pruning the lower limbs of the big douglas firs that were growing back, to maximize the quality of the sawlog, and then one day a timber company showed up and declared their right to log off all their trees--FOR FREE!
Turns out back in the misty depths of time one foolish land owner of the land and sighed off the timber rights of the property in -perpetuity-. The book went to print before they could record how that legal hairball turned out. Arg..

Joe

Re: Crane Forest

Post by Joe » Wed Apr 30, 2014 4:00 pm

Rand wrote:Joe,

Reminds me of a rather nasty anecdote I came across in my reading. A guy bought some beat up timber property in the pacific northwest. Put a decade and more into cleaning up all the old slash, and pruning the lower limbs of the big douglas firs that were growing back, to maximize the quality of the sawlog, and then one day a timber company showed up and declared their right to log off all their trees--FOR FREE!
Turns out back in the misty depths of time one foolish land owner of the land and sighed off the timber rights of the property in -perpetuity-. The book went to print before they could record how that legal hairball turned out. Arg..
Selling the timber rights should have been recorded in the local registry of deeds. If that wasn't done, there might be some legal claim against the validity of the deal- since the purchase and sales agreement and the deed to the current owner should have indicated this situation. If it was filed in the registry- then when the guy bought the property, his lawyer didn't do a good title search.
Joe

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Rand
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Re: Crane Forest

Post by Rand » Wed Apr 30, 2014 6:29 pm

Joe wrote:
Rand wrote:Joe,

Reminds me of a rather nasty anecdote I came across in my reading. A guy bought some beat up timber property in the pacific northwest. Put a decade and more into cleaning up all the old slash, and pruning the lower limbs of the big douglas firs that were growing back, to maximize the quality of the sawlog, and then one day a timber company showed up and declared their right to log off all their trees--FOR FREE!
Turns out back in the misty depths of time one foolish land owner of the land and sighed off the timber rights of the property in -perpetuity-. The book went to print before they could record how that legal hairball turned out. Arg..
Selling the timber rights should have been recorded in the local registry of deeds. If that wasn't done, there might be some legal claim against the validity of the deal- since the purchase and sales agreement and the deed to the current owner should have indicated this situation. If it was filed in the registry- then when the guy bought the property, his lawyer didn't do a good title search.
Joe
It's been too long ago for me to remember the details, and there weren't that many to start with since the legal issues weren't the focus of the book. But I do remember the legality was being challenged by the owner.

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