Carolina hemlock genetics study

General discussions of forests and trees that do not focus on a specific species or specific location.

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

User avatar
Steve Galehouse
Posts: 700
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 11:50 pm

Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Post by Steve Galehouse » Sun Mar 02, 2014 10:37 pm

Jason-

I met up with Dr. Jetton and a grad student last summer; they collected samples of the Carolina hemlocks. I think it might be up to a year until we know the full information on the Carolina hemlocks at the site. Either way, a reproducing population of Carolina hemlock is something special.

Steve
every plant is native somewhere

User avatar
jasonbaker
Posts: 33
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 12:29 pm

Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Post by jasonbaker » Tue Mar 04, 2014 10:34 am

I figured it might take awhile which also explains why you haven't updated this thread. Thanks for the update! I didn't see your post earlier because I missed the page 2 link for the thread :)
Last edited by jasonbaker on Wed Mar 05, 2014 5:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Steve Galehouse
Posts: 700
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 11:50 pm

Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Post by Steve Galehouse » Tue Mar 04, 2014 12:39 pm

Jason, NTS-

Attached is the most current information I have regarding the Carolina hemlocks, which I received last December.
Jetton et al. 2013, TPN 56(59-71).pdf
(6.28 MiB) Downloaded 128 times
Steve
every plant is native somewhere

User avatar
jasonbaker
Posts: 33
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 12:29 pm

Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Post by jasonbaker » Tue Mar 04, 2014 1:39 pm

Awesome! I'll read that PDF when I get home in a few hours.

Thanks for sharing.

User avatar
jasonbaker
Posts: 33
Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2014 12:29 pm

Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Post by jasonbaker » Wed Mar 05, 2014 4:47 pm

Interesting read. I didn't realize that there was a seed orchard program in South America. At least if our hemlock populations are devastated, the genes for the trees should be safe for quite some time.

I'm assuming that if the genetic testing results for the CVNP Carolina hemlocks are shown to be different from the other established populations, it should prove they are a native disjunct population.

User avatar
Steve Galehouse
Posts: 700
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 11:50 pm

Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Post by Steve Galehouse » Wed Mar 05, 2014 5:49 pm

Jason-

Yes, that's the implication. At the very least the trees at Ritchie Ledges will likely be among the last of the species to be exposed to HWA due to their relative remoteness.

Steve
every plant is native somewhere

User avatar
jamesrobertsmith
Posts: 906
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 5:32 am

Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Wed Mar 05, 2014 8:35 pm

Isn't there an island off the coast of Chile that's being planted with Eastern and Carolina hemlocks? A just-in-case precaution?

User avatar
Will Blozan
Posts: 1153
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:13 pm

Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Post by Will Blozan » Thu Mar 06, 2014 7:41 am

Steve,

That population is so infinitesimally small that it should be a no-brainer to treat the entire stand when HWA arrives. It could be done in less than a day for a very reasonable price if contracted. If someone paid my way I'd do it as a volunteer; insecticide included.

Hopefully it won't go the route of other stands- victims of apathy, misinformation, red tape and lack of funding. This population- if indeed a relic outlier- is so important to preserve for many reasons. There are no longer any viable excuses not to.

Will

User avatar
Steve Galehouse
Posts: 700
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 11:50 pm

Re: Carolina hemlock genetics study

Post by Steve Galehouse » Thu Mar 06, 2014 11:27 am

Will-

I'm not sure if it's good or bad that these hemlocks are within a national park, as far as treating them if HWA arrives to the area. I've let my pesticide applicator license lapse, but would be glad to get re-certified to treat these trees. So far in northern Ohio HWA has been confined to production nurseries and ornamental plantings, and control has been successful.

Steve
every plant is native somewhere

Post Reply

Return to “General Discussions”