Mapping Software

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edfrank
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Mapping Software

Post by edfrank » Wed Nov 20, 2013 9:03 pm

Some of you are interested in mapping software. This package designed for cave mapping is free:

During the development period for WinKarst2010 the older 12.5 version is now freeware and can be used directly by download this zip file.
http://www.petries.net/winkarst.zip

It only runs on Windows. There might be some applications for tree mapping.

http://www.resurgentsoftware.com/winkarst.html
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Don
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Re: Mapping Software

Post by Don » Thu Nov 21, 2013 2:07 am

Ed-
In 1975, I was working for the Deerlodge National Forest out of Butte, Montana (elevation nearly 6000')...and rented a room in a mining fraternity near the Montana Institute of Mining. One of the first things you'd see walking into the Institute was a mock-up of most of the hard rock mining shafts in the immediate area. It was about 7' tall, and made up of what resembled flexible straws...the scale was about 1' to 1000', as one of the major mines (I've since forgotten its name) was more than 7000 foot deep, and the bottom was actually below sea level. The network of 'straws' was amazing.
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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Don
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Re: Mapping Software

Post by Don » Fri Nov 22, 2013 9:15 am

I'm also recalling that one of the MIM students worked the night shift on the deepest mine. It took him 45 minutes to arrive near the bottom of the mine in an elevator. His task was to take instrument readings on the various pipes and valves used to cool the mine shaft, which was quite warm at that depth. Numerous 24" water mains drew water from top side reservoirs (one was approximately a 100' cube, another a similar dimension cylinder that he walked by, getting to the elevators.
I remember him commenting that there was some concern about sudden shutting of valves. If one has had household faucets make a 'clunking' kind of noise when shut off too quickly, it's not hard to imagine what would happen at the bottom of the mine where the valves shut too quickly. Reg said he imagined being shot out of the mine shaft like a rocket...
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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