Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

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edfrank
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Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Post by edfrank » Sun Oct 02, 2011 2:28 pm

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

http://action.sierraclub.org/site/Messa ... d=186801.0

September 21, 2010


Contact: Kristina Johnson

(415) 977-5619

Kristina.johnson@sierraclub.org


Protect Sequoia National Monument.


***MEDIA ADVISORY for WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22***

Citizens Urge Forest Service to Protect Giant Sequoia National Monument from Logging


San Francisco - One of California's most treasured landscapes, the Giant Sequoia National Monument, is under threat. The Forest Service has released new management plans for the Monument that include heavy logging of giant sequoia trees. The Sierra Club has proposed an alternative plan in which the ancient forest is recognized for its tourist, recreational, and ecological value and is managed in a similar fashion to a national park. Sierra Club is reaching out to thousands of Bay Area citizens and asking them to attend this hearing and send comments to the Forest Service in order to help save Giant Sequoia National Monument for future generations.


WHAT: Public hearing to determine the future of Giant Sequoia National Monument

WHO: Bay Area citizens, Forest Service officials

WHERE: Hyatt Regency San Francisco, 5 Embarcadero Center, Pacific Concourse

WHEN: Wednesday, September 22, 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.


*** Visuals include activists with signs and buttons. Sierra Club leaders and volunteers will be available for interviews.


Protect Sequoia National Monument.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

RyanLeClair
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Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Post by RyanLeClair » Sun Oct 02, 2011 4:18 pm

That is a dynamite link, Ed. Just about every environmental issue you can think of is there.

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Mon Oct 03, 2011 1:18 pm

RyanLeClair wrote: There are plans underway to begin logging in the giant sequoia groves. According to this plan the very largest specimens will go untouched but trees of medium size will be felled. The park service has thinned out smaller trees in the past but this new plan seems much more drastic.
If the plan truly calls for simply thinning out smaller trees that have crowded in in order to correct past misguided "put it out on the same day" fire suppression in the area, and leaving all old-growth and larger merchantable sequoias alone, then it might not be that bad of an idea. It might actually leave the forest in question in a more natural, closer to pre-settlement condition.

However, if the plan is in any way a ruse to get at any merchantable timber or larger trees under the guise of aiding "forest health" then it's a bad idea.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

RyanLeClair
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Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Post by RyanLeClair » Wed Oct 05, 2011 7:51 pm

This doesn't seem like a gentle thinning-out, PA, it looks to be logging for the sake of profit. Very sad, but there's reason for hope: Greenpeace just prevented a bunch of logging within Indonesia, so it shouldn't be too hard for Sierra Club to get work done in its own back yard.

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edfrank
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A Balancing Act for America's Greatest Trees

Post by edfrank » Thu Oct 06, 2011 7:39 pm

A Balancing Act for America's Greatest Trees
http://sierraclub.typepad.com/layofthel ... trees.html



Click on image to see its original size
Crown of sequoias NPSGiant sequoias are the world's largest tree species by volume (Image: NPS)

On September 24, 180,000 Americans converged on their favorite local beaches, forests, and parks to celebrate National Public Lands Day. Across the country, volunteers planted native vegetation, cleaned up trails, and removed invasive species in two thousand locations, highlighting the social and environmental significance of natural spaces. Federally and state-owned acreage protects lands and resources that belong to us all, including many of our nation’s greatest ecological, geological, and historical treasures.

Just as important, and growing in emphasis in conservation discourse, is the economic value of public lands. As bedrock environmental laws and programs come under fire in a hostile Congress, lands and wilderness advocates have argued against the false dichotomy of “jobs vs. the environment” thinking. Protected landscapes support a diverse outdoor economy and enhance quality of life for nearby communities. In a comprehensive study of large National Monuments, Headwaters Economics found not one instance in which the designation of a National Monument hindered local economies—population, jobs, and per capita income instead rose in the majority of cases.

Such is the case in Giant Sequoia National Monument, a 330 million acre tract in California’s Sierra Nevada range. Designated in 2000 by President Clinton, the monument is home to three dozen of the world’s remaining Giant Sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum). This species falls among the largest and oldest organisms on the entire planet. Giant Sequoias grow to a greater volume than any other tree, a fact which precipitated intense logging in the late 1800s.


Click on image to see its original size
Pacific Fisher USFWS
The Pacific fisher and other threatened species like the California spotted owl call the Great Sequoia National Monument home (Image: USFWS)


Giant sequoias are closely tied to the history of the Sierra Club. The organization’s founder, John Muir, fought and won protection for the groves in Sequoia National Park, where conservative thinning and a prescribed burn regimen have resulted in successful ecosystem management. Unfortunately, the fight to preserve adjacent stands in Giant Sequoia National Monument continues. For the past ten years, the U.S. Forest Service has managed the Monument in a manner inconsistent with the intent of the proclamation, logging millions of board feet of timber each year and leaving fire-prone openings in the landscape. Now the Forest Service is making plans for the future of the Monument, and the public has been weighing in on management practices.

Two days before National Public Lands Day, twenty Sierra Club activists had the privilege of meeting in Washington, D.C. with the U.S. Under Secretary of Agriculture, Harris Sherman. Longtime chapter chair Vicky Hoover traveled from the Sierra Nevada to lead the meeting, in which she delivered a portion of over 100,000 petitions expressing concerns about logging in the Giant Sequoia National Monument. Outlining the unique ecology of Sequoiadendron giganteum, Ms. Hoover explained that the practice of protecting large trees while clearcutting smaller ones can degrade the health of the greater natural system.

Americans overwhelmingly support the preservation of our natural heritage, and no more so than in emblematic places like Giant Sequoia National Monument. Another public comment period will take place after the release of Giant Sequoia’s final Monument Plan draft, and it will be up to us to continue calling for the greatest possible protection of this national treasure.


Click on image to see its original size
Vicky & Harris Sherman Sierra Club's Vicky Hoover presents Under Secretary of Agriculture Harris Sherman with a sample of 100,000 petitions.

Read the Headwaters Economics report on the economic benefits of Great Sequoia National Monument here: http://headwaterseconomics.org/apps-pub ... equoia.pdf

For updates on the Giant Sequoia National Monument Management Plan process, visit
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/sequoia/gsnm_planning.html

.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

Joe

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Post by Joe » Thu Oct 06, 2011 8:08 pm

"a 330 million acre tract"

that can't be right, can it?

Joe

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edfrank
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Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Post by edfrank » Thu Oct 06, 2011 8:13 pm

Joe,

No it isn't. "The Giant Sequoia National Monument is located within the Sequoia National Forest in south-central California. The outer boundaries of the area encompass approximately 327,769 acres of federal land managed by the United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. The monument is located in two parcels bisected by the Sequoia National Park. The northern boundary is the Kings River. The southern parcel is entirely in Tulare County. The eastern boundary is the North Fork of the Kern River. Establishment of the Giant Sequoia National Monument brings permanent protection and recognition to all of the federally-owned giant sequoia groves within the Sequoia National Forest."
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/sequoia/gsnm/overview.html

.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

Joe

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Post by Joe » Thu Oct 06, 2011 8:31 pm

edfrank wrote:Joe,

No it isn't. "The Giant Sequoia National Monument is located within the Sequoia National Forest in south-central California. The outer boundaries of the area encompass approximately 327,769 acres of federal land managed by the United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. The monument is located in two parcels bisected by the Sequoia National Park. The northern boundary is the Kings River. The southern parcel is entirely in Tulare County. The eastern boundary is the North Fork of the Kern River. Establishment of the Giant Sequoia National Monument brings permanent protection and recognition to all of the federally-owned giant sequoia groves within the Sequoia National Forest."
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/sequoia/gsnm/overview.html

.
but, 327,769 acres is not 330 million acres
Joe

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edfrank
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Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Post by edfrank » Thu Oct 06, 2011 9:43 pm

No it isn't (330 million acres....)

I was agreeing with you.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

Joe

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Post by Joe » Fri Oct 07, 2011 6:24 am

edfrank wrote:No it isn't (330 million acres....)

I was agreeing with you.
Oh, OK, Ed--- you're too subtle. (ha, ha)

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