Summary Statistics

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dbhguru
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Summary Statistics

Post by dbhguru » Sun May 30, 2010 7:17 pm

ENTS,

Before I call it quits in Mohawk and start thinking about ponderosas for the upcoming WNTS rendezvous, I have summarized some significant stats below.

Height Class No Pines Current Maximum All-time Maximum

>=140 ft 227
>=150 ft 109
>=160 ft 9 169.3 169.3


Girth Class No Pines

>=10 ft 60
>=11 ft 22
>=12 6 12.7 14.6 (all-time max)

Volume Class No Pines

>=400 ft^3 62
>=500 ft^3 28
>=600 ft^3 9
>=700 ft^3 3 793 >800 (all-time max)

Height and Girth
Combinations

Hgt>=140 and
Girth>=10 42

Hgt>=150 and
Girth>=9 48

Hgt>=160 and
Girth>=8 9

Hgt>=150 and
Girth>=11 11

Hgt>=160 and
Girth>=12 1
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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James Parton
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Re: Summary Statistics

Post by James Parton » Sun May 30, 2010 7:31 pm

Bob,

14.6 ft cbh for an all time max girth is a massive pine. Do you have any more data on this tree?

James
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

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dbhguru
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Re: Summary Statistics

Post by dbhguru » Mon May 31, 2010 8:25 am

James,

Yep, I most certainly do. The 14.6-footer was Big Bertha. She was 148 feet tall at the time she croaked. Jack Sobon discovered the big pine originally and measured her back in the 1980s. She was the pride of MTSF, proof that the site could grow true whoppers. But alas, one year her top died and a couple of years after that she was stone dead. Bummer. The Google image below shows the area where Big Pertha grew.
Slide1.jpg
The pines on the south side of Route #2 are the Trout Brook pines. I'll eventually fine tune the maps. They quickly reach large size in the lower Trout Brook cove. The next image looks down into the cove from Totem Trail Lookout. The ridge you see in the image is the lower slope of Hawks Mountain. Big Bertha grew at the base of Hawks near where Trout Brook runs under Route #2.
Slide22.jpg
With John Eichholz confirming a 145-foot pine on the West River across in Vermont, it is becoming clearer that the Connecticut River corridor and the lower elevations of the Berkshires and Green Mountain was big pine country. It was probably one of the centers of for some of the largest eastern white pines along with places in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, and the southern Appalachians. Viva la great whites.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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James Parton
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Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2010 5:47 pm

Re: Summary Statistics

Post by James Parton » Mon May 31, 2010 2:13 pm

Bob,

That is sad. Whites that big are rare. I wonder how old Big Bertha was at the time of death?

James
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

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dbhguru
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Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Summary Statistics

Post by dbhguru » Mon May 31, 2010 7:32 pm

James,

Big Bertha was at most 150 years. She ate her Wheaties in the morning and spinach in the evenings each and every day.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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