Massasoit, MTSF, MA

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dbhguru
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Massasoit, MTSF, MA

Post by dbhguru » Fri Mar 09, 2012 8:52 am

NTS,

Massasoit was the grand chief of the Wampanoags who lived from 1590 to 1661. He was known for his friendly relations with the Pilgrams, which he maintained throughout his life. As a consequence, Massasoit is honored in many places. Massasoit is a common place name and it is the name of a white pine in (where else?) Mohawk Trail State Forest. The big double-trunk pine was climbed by Will Blozan in 2006 at an ENTS rendezvous. We all stood out in the rain and exercised our craft. Will took images from the top of the tree. I may have some of them in some computer file, and if so will post a couple.

As I recall, Massasoit was 146.5 or 146.6 feet at the time. And the top was not where we initially thought it would be. Here is a look at the pine as seen across a leach field. The leaning trunk has the highest point.
MTSFMassassoit1.jpg
The next shot points to the top of Massasoit as determined by Will on his climb. I vaguely remember him moving the top so we could see what he was measuring. Here is a look.
MTSFMassassoit3.jpg
Yesterday, I went to Mohawk and re-measured Massasoit. I took a tripod and set it up at a sufficiently far spot to see the true top. I put a yellow marker at DBH height, clearly visible from my distant vantage point. With repeated shots, I settled on 150.4 feet. Massasoit becomes #120 for Mohawk. With 120 great whites reaching the 150-foot threshold, I happily reported the result to DCR and others. Nothing like a little advanced promotion for the October workshop.

On my previous re-measure of Massasoit, I tried to do it from the center of the leach field. I forgot where I had to be positioned to see the highest sprig. But the true top is not visible from the closer vantage point. From there, what appears to be the top is 148.0 feet in height. The highest point of the companion trunk is 147.7 feet. The double trunk measures 14.1 feet around.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Massasoit, MTSF, MA

Post by Larry Tucei » Fri Mar 09, 2012 7:00 pm

Bob, The saga continues congrats on another 150 footer! Just think in a few more years you will have to start the 160 foot club. I wish White Pines would grow down here they are such a beautiful Pine. I love the way the limbs fan out from the trunk. I'll never forget the first time I saw some Whites up in Wisconsin back in 2001. I was like a kid in a candy store and just enjoyed the heck out of them. I have to go and see the Cathedral Pine area. That would really be a special place, it's about 2-3 hours out of my way on the trip up but would be worth it. Paul Jost did a post on them back in 10. http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=132&t=1320 Larry

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Re: Massasoit, MTSF, MA

Post by dbhguru » Fri Mar 09, 2012 7:43 pm

Larry,

Wisconsin has some real beauties. So does Michigan. I expect that Wisconsin's and Michigan's great whites matched those of New England in pre-colonial times. Impossible to say, but likely. It's the stuff that big tree dreams are made of. Fuel for the imagination.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Massasoit, MTSF, MA

Post by Larry Tucei » Sat Mar 10, 2012 12:51 pm

Bob, I'm positive that would have been a possibility and maybe they would have been even larger than the trees in New England. I know the Black River Valley area may have contained perhaps as many as 500 hundred thousand - a million whites before they clear cut them in the mid to late 1800's. I remember on a sign there at an observation point that stated just the White Pine lumber cut from this one valley could have built a road around the world. I took theses back in 07. I wish I knew how tall they would have been perhaps as high as 170-200 we may never know. White Pines onced ruled the Northlands! Larry
Attachments
Black River Valley White Pine Remnants
Black River Valley White Pine Remnants
Black River Valley sign.jpg
Black River Valley White Pine Remnants 2.jpg

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