Mass DCR Program at MTSF, Sept. 18, 2010

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dbhguru
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Mass DCR Program at MTSF, Sept. 18, 2010

Post by dbhguru » Sun Sep 19, 2010 1:36 pm

James,

Outstanding contribution. http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=186&t=1377 I actually am acquainted with Joan Maloof. She is a very special person, as her writing reveals. I am so glad that Joan has an old-growth forest relatively close by that she can visit and drink of its potent elixir. And what she reminds us of is priceless. Her eloquent writing reminds me how I perk up when entering an old forest. I begin drinking in 'things' that my inner being knows are good for me. I feel energized and pacified at the same time. By contrast, when I walk in a cut-over landscape, all the goodies are gone. I'm left with a sense of pain and anger or disgust. My system tells me that all of the good stuff has been eliminated. The sense of differentiation of the feeling I get when walking in different classes of woodlands has grown over time. I used to think it was my imagination, but not any more.

Yesterday, I did a program for the Mass DCR in Mohawk Trail State Forest, despite a cold that periodically sends me into fits of coughing. I wasn't too excited with the idea of doing a demanding program while feeling so miserable, but had nobody to take the program for me and DCR had done an excellent job of advertising the event. I'm doing a series of programs under their banner. This was the 3rd in a series of four programs. It included a walk through the big trees in the Trees of Peace and Algonquin groves and then up Todd Mountain onto the old Indian Trail to a scenic lookout. The roundtrip distance is about 3.5 miles. The elevation gain by the chosen path was approximately 1,150 feet, and some of it very steep. Coming down from Todd, you have to use your hands in a few places, where the told colonial trail has washed out. So the trip was appropriately listed as strenuous. Before the event began, I was afraid that my voice would give out somewhere in the middle. Was it worth the cost? Well, I expected around a dozen people to attend and I didn't want to disappoint them. So it was buckle up and stiffen up and carry on. By show time, 30 people had showed up. This was going to have to be a gala performance. It turned out that all the people were absolutely wonderful. The forest worked its magic right away. Everyone had plenty of questions and were fully engaged. The sun came out, my voice held up, I didn't have too many coughing spasms, and all was well in Middle Earth. From 10:00AM until almost 4:00PM, I talked continuously. The great pines, the old growth hemlocks, the twisted oaks on Todd, and the ancient black birches sent me the energy I needed.

Yesterday's event was supposed to happen - a sick Bob, or no. There seems to be an awakening taking place. People who live not more than 20 miles from Mohawk are discovering it. Most are gentle spirits who belong in the forest, souls who tread lightly and respectfully. They will join in as its protectors. I have waited 20 years to see this happen. I am watching it unfold before my eyes. Given the opportunity, the forest works its magic.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

slheller
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2010 9:08 am

Re: Mass DCR Program at MTSF, Sept. 18, 2010

Post by slheller » Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:41 am

There seems to be an awakening taking place. People who live not more than 20 miles from Mohawk are discovering it. Most are gentle spirits who belong in the forest, souls who tread lightly and respectfully. They will join in as its protectors. I have waited 20 years to see this happen. I am watching it unfold before my eyes. Given the opportunity, the forest works its magic.
The same thing is happening regarding the Myles Standish State Forest and the pine barrens of southeastern MA. It's a thrill to see people who've lived here their whole lives suddenly realize they live in one of the world's largest remaining tract of rare pine barrens habitat. Hundreds of people have emerged recently who want to be part of an effort to preserve, restore and enjoy the forest.

Your program sounds wonderful, Bob. I'm certain your sharing your love of Mowhawk Trail SF the way you do is a beacon lighting the way to the "awakening".

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