The Ash Search Has Begun

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dbhguru
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Re: The Ash Search Has Begun

Post by dbhguru » Sun Jun 24, 2018 12:11 pm

Joshua,

Blow-downs have changed the ash picture from that early post, and we have not surveyed for EAB damage. Jared Lockwood has started re-measuring our tall ash trees and has confirmed two over 145. I expect that we still have between 6 and 12 over 140. Documenting them better is a good idea before they are gone.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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JHarkness
Posts: 249
Joined: Sun May 13, 2018 5:44 pm

Re: The Ash Search Has Begun

Post by JHarkness » Sun Jun 24, 2018 1:32 pm

Bob,

I believe I actually have several 140s on my property, I know of two that are definitely above 140, and I assumed the rest were in the 120s or 130s, but I recently measured the smallest white ash in the grove and it's an astounding 135' tall, a nearby ash, which is perfectly healthy no less, is noticeably taller. At the present, I believe we have 2 or 3 healthy 140-footers, and 3 dead or dying 140s, we probably have around a dozen 130s as well, most of which are still healthy. Once my trees have been measured, I plan to start searching the Housatonic River Valley and it's watershed in Connecticut, New York and Massachusetts for more tall ashes.

In other news regarding white ash, I ring counted a limb in the crown of a small tree that had come down a couple years ago in a storm, seventy feet in the air the ring count was 108. Amazingly, this tree was no more than 95-100' tall when it was alive, I would guess that this tree was just over 200 years old when it died. Also of interest was that it went through 10-15 year cycles of slow and fast growth, some decades it would put on around a eighth of an inch per year, others it would put on only hundredths of an inch per year. I've become fascinated with the growth rates of the species...

Joshua
"Be not simply good; be good for something." Henry David Thoreau

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dbhguru
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Re: The Ash Search Has Begun

Post by dbhguru » Sun Jun 24, 2018 2:52 pm

Joshua,

Yes sir, ring patterns are fascinating. I regularly observe spurts in growth behavior, which presumably are accounted for by wet versus dry years and for some species insect infestations such as gypsy moths for white oaks. However, I usually expect spurts to be less prevalent in much older trees. Below is an example of a tree that is about 190 years old and decided to do some spurting.

In MTSF, the huge Saheda Pine went over 172 feet maybe 2 weeks ago. That was expected. What was not expected was a spurt of diameter growth. Saheda is now 12.2 feet around. From the spot I measured it, I think it was 12.1 last year. A tenth of a foot in girth is 1.2 inches. That is huge for a tree Saheda's age. This season's growth candle, as measured by Jared Lockwood is 7.5 inches. Over the course of the last 20 years, the pine has averaged 8.22 inches per year. I have its trunk volume at 875 ft^3. Adding 7% for limbs gives us 936 ft^3. Converting that to CO2, we get 19.8 tons pulled from the air. For comparison purposes, at 50 years, it is unlikely that Saheda had over 100^3 of trunk volume. adding in limbs and converting to CO2, we get 2.2 tons. The difference of 17.5 tons was added after Saheda's 50th year. Quite an increase.

Maybe we can do some volume and carbon modeling on your trees. Every time you report, I'm more impressed with your site and the potential is holds. The national models (allometric equations) just don't work well with our bigger trees. The following source:

Assessing terrestrial laser scanning for developing non-destructive biomass
allometry

Atticus E.L. Stovalla,b,⁎, Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeirab,c, Herman H. Shugarta
a Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA
b Conservation Ecology Center, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park, Front Royal, VA, USA
c
Center for Tropical Forest Science-Forest Global Earth Observatory, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama, Panama

calls into serious question, the allometric equations in common use. Here is a quote that highlights the problem.

Overall, the national-scale equations underestimated biomass and
had higher uncertainty than the TLS allometry (Fig. 8). The compiled
biomass predictions using the national scale equations underestimated
biomass on average in trees above 2500 kg.


Note the 2500 Kg. This is total above ground biomass. It equates to 6,350 lbs. Saheda's above ground biomass is approximately 22,464 lbs. The national model was obviously built on much smaller trees. However, we knew that.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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JHarkness
Posts: 249
Joined: Sun May 13, 2018 5:44 pm

Re: The Ash Search Has Begun

Post by JHarkness » Sun Jun 24, 2018 4:39 pm

Bob,

I just created this topic to use as a base for my search for white ashes here: http://ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=105&t=8304

You make an interesting point with the growth rates, and you've given me an idea. Might some species go through spurts of height growth to get ahead of the competition, then slow down their height growth to focus on adding wood to their trunk for a few years? Would there be a, though possibly minuscule, decrease in height when there's a significant increase in girth and perhaps a decrease in seed production while they devote their energy to putting on more wood? If certain trees focused on girth in some years and height and seed production in others, perhaps the height would stay very much the same between year while girth and seed production would fluctuate.

As for my site, I'm still amazed at what it holds, I feel I've barely scratched the surface in terms of what the trees here are capable of, and I've only shared little tidbits of that here on ENTS, essentially I'm waiting for better measuring equipment so I can get more accurate height results and not have to take dozens of measurements to get a good idea of a tree's height, but then again, some species I don't have enough information on yet. For example, I have some very impressive sugar maples and beeches, but I've hardly measured them and can't possibly create a report on them yet.

I would love to do some volume modeling on these trees, I've tried to do it on a couple trees, but I haven't take enough winter time shots free of lens distortion to do so, only the Perry Hill Ash has been modeled to a fair degree of accuracy so far.
'
Joshua
"Be not simply good; be good for something." Henry David Thoreau

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