Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

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Larry Tucei
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Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

Post by Larry Tucei » Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:56 pm

NTS, In the last few weeks I have been involved with helping the owners of Oak Alley in Documenting their Live Oaks behind the Mansion. I have been down 3 times and finally finished up with the process. I measured a total of 31 Live Oaks that ranged from 9' CBH to 19' CBH. I gave them a listing of measurements, locations of the various Live Oaks and a estimation on the ages of the trees. Four of the trees I measured are 19' + CBH and I put them on the Live Oak Project listing. It has been a pleasure working on this project. I also measured the large Water Oak that I reported on in an earlier visit. The first photo set is of one of the Live Oaks near the Restaurant that measured CBH-17' 9", Height-52.5' and Crown Spread-115' x 114', a beautiful Oak with older growth characteristics. The second set of photos are of the large Water Oak that pointed out at 355, the Louisiana State Champion Water Oak points out at 397 if their measurements are accurate. The Water Oak measured CBH- 20' 5", Height- 82.5' and Crown Spread-97.5' x 91.5'. Larry
Attachments
Live Oak near gift shop
Live Oak near gift shop
Oak near the Gift Shop 2.jpg
Oak_Alley_Live_Oak_Trees 2_Jan_2013.pptx
Live Oak locations
(59.02 KiB) Downloaded 71 times
Oak Alley Trees behind the Mansion.xlsx
Measurement and Age Estimates
(11.69 KiB) Downloaded 72 times
Water Oak
Water Oak
Water Oak 2.jpg
Water Oak 3.jpg

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dbhguru
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Re: Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

Post by dbhguru » Mon Feb 18, 2013 5:15 pm

Larry,

Gorgeous photographs. Thanks for continuing the search and the story. There are so many more trees with large girths in your neck of the woods. I never understood how many.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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John Harvey
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Re: Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

Post by John Harvey » Mon Feb 18, 2013 8:29 pm

Very nice Larry, I wasnt even aware of any other large oaks there beside the famous ones you always see in photos. ( J Stewart Tree ect)
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

Post by Larry Tucei » Mon Feb 18, 2013 9:40 pm

Bob, Thanks, the saga continues, part 3 is on Felicity which is the Sister Plantation to St. Joseph. I added 5 of the 6 Live Oaks I measured there to the Live Oak Listing which I will update in part 3. Johnny- I now have documented over 214 Live Oaks with a CBH of 19' or greater- soon the Listing will reach 300! Larry

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John Harvey
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Re: Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

Post by John Harvey » Tue Feb 19, 2013 9:19 am

Thats great Larry, enjoyed the photos. Here in Jersey, after extensive searching, Ive only been able to find about 10 or 12 oaks with a CBH over 19', mostly White Oaks, (some Willow, Black, Red, Southern Red). Obviously colder climate and absence of Live Oaks here.
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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Jess Riddle
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Re: Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

Post by Jess Riddle » Wed Feb 20, 2013 10:05 pm

Larry,

That water oak is really impressive. You see 15' cbh ones scattered across the south fairly frequently, but I've never seen a 20' one.

Jess

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

Post by Larry Tucei » Thu Feb 21, 2013 3:22 pm

Jess- Yeah I hear ya. I was like Whoa!, the first time I saw it so I had to go back and get the measurements. Larry

Jeroen Philippona
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Re: Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

Post by Jeroen Philippona » Thu Feb 21, 2013 4:00 pm

Hi Larry,

Sure the Live Oaks are very impressive, perhaps the most impressive oak species concerning crown structure. The large girths are not so strange in such a good climate. But the idea that the more northern species are not able grow so big is perhaps not true. The biggest girths are on open grown oaks: in the formerly dense natural forest oaks were long trunked and probably rarely bigger than 20 - 25 feet, like you can see in Congaree now. Perhaps the Live Oaks in their natural habitat were often open grown and as large as they are now, up to over 30 feet.

I think that one of the reasons that there are very few 20+ oaks in the Northeast US can be the rather short history of open grown trees in this region.

In Europe, especially in the UK, there are many 20+ oaks. In the Ancient Tree Hunt there are 3827 oaks of all kinds recorded in the UK with a girth of 20 feet and over. Of these alone Quercus robur 1853 specimen.
This number is probably so large because of he many centuries old culture of open grown oaks in grazed forests, deer parks, estates and in the old style meadow landscape with hedges and solitarian trees.

Also in Sweden, Germany, France and Poland there are rather large numbers of big, open grown oaks. The largest of all living oaks (over 14 m, 46 ft) is in Sweden, so in a northern and rather cold climate.

Also I like to show you a very special pedunculate oak in Spain: http://www.monumentaltrees.com/en/esp/c ... edepierre/

more photos at: http://lestetardsarboricoles.fr/wordpre ... e-espagne/

This is probably a product of old style pollarding the tree.

Jeroen

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

Post by Larry Tucei » Fri Feb 22, 2013 3:04 pm

Jeroen- The Oak in Navarre Spain is impressive thanks for the link. William Bartram detailed in his writings from the mid 1700's of Forests with trees of great size. http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/bartram/bartram.html Live Oaks only grow in temps that don't stay below 10 degrees. I believe the short growing season in the northern climate and cold tempertures account for smaller size's. "The range of live oak corresponds to southeastern maritime strand communities (Oosting 1954) which lie southward of the 5.5° C (41.9° F) isotherm for average daily minimum temperatures in the coldest month of the year, typically January (Johnson and Barbour 1990)". http://www.sms.si.edu/irlspec/Quercu_virginic.htm

Larry

Jeroen Philippona
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Re: Live Oaks in Vacherie Louisiana Part 2 Oak Alley

Post by Jeroen Philippona » Sun Feb 24, 2013 9:12 am

Larry,

I agree that colder climate is responcible for the smaller size of Live Oak in more northern states. But looking to the other oaks species in the eastern USA (like White Oak, Northern Red Oak, Cherry Bark Oak, Bur Oak, etc.) most of them in the natural situation before European settlers came grew in dense forests (except for the drier western borders of the eastern forest). So the oldest open grown oaks of those species (as well as other treespecies in the east) will date from the period that the great forests were cut open. I suppose that there are few open grown oaks outside the deep south of over 200 - 250 years old.
That is a shorter period than in Europe, where the forests were cut open from before the Roman period.
Open grown oaks as well as Sweet Chestnuts, Plane trees (Platanus orientalis) and Lime trees (Tilia spec.) in Europe can be found from over 400 years. Ages are difficult to prove because most very big trees are hollow. Tree ring research for oak has proven some oaks were over 500 years. But some oaks as well as specimen of these other species are thought with reason to be 500 - 700 years, perhaps older.
So my point is that the reason that there are more very big trunked oaks in Europe than in the eastern US (except for Quercus virginiana) could be the much longer tradition of open grown oaks in Europe.

Jeroen

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