Visit to Fork Ridge Tulip Poplar and nearby LIDAR hits

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dbhguru
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Re: Visit to Fork Ridge Tulip Poplar and nearby LIDAR hits

Post by dbhguru » Sun Apr 20, 2014 1:29 pm

Patrick,

We're all mightily impressed with your trip and the trip report. They represent the best of NTS and clearly point to the need for ground-truthing. I'm bullish on LIDAR and its continued use, but confirmations are needed. Paired with ground-truthing, LIDAR has been the huge leap forward that all of us were hoping for to pinpoint areas with great potential. The final judgment must still come from NTS measurement methods.

I wonder if there actually is a 200-foot tulip out there somewhere. Were I to bet one way or another, I'd probably bet against it, at least confirming one. Still ......

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Josh Kelly
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Re: Visit to Fork Ridge Tulip Poplar and nearby LIDAR hits

Post by Josh Kelly » Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:58 am

Patrick,

I'm looking forward to seeing your route. I doubt the tree in your photo is the same tree. The 17' x 185 individual has a major branch at 57' up the bole and as I mentioned is not particularly well formed. It may be just perspective, but the crown on your 19' x 170' tree seems much more impressive, and I think it is probably a newly documented individual. This photo shows what the Ursa Cage 185 footer looks like in June.

Josh
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pdbrandt
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Re: Visit to Fork Ridge Tulip Poplar and nearby LIDAR hits

Post by pdbrandt » Mon Apr 21, 2014 8:26 pm

Jess Riddle wrote:
Interestingly, people seem to have two fundamentally different styles of walking (flailing) through rhododendron thickets. I've heard many people talk about black and blue shins, but others consistently come out unscathed.

Jess
I need to learn from someone in the latter group!!
Patrick

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pdbrandt
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Re: Visit to Fork Ridge Tulip Poplar and nearby LIDAR hits

Post by pdbrandt » Mon Apr 21, 2014 8:33 pm

dbhguru wrote:Patrick,

I wonder if there actually is a 200-foot tulip out there somewhere. Were I to bet one way or another, I'd probably bet against it, at least confirming one. Still ......

Bob
I, naively perhaps, expected to find another 190 footer on this trip and 2 weeks ago wouldn't have been surprised to learn of a 200 foot tuliptree. After seeing the dominance of the the Fork Ridge Tuliptree over the other tulips in its immediate vicinity and then not finding another 180 footer despite all my wanderings, I seriously wonder if a 200 foot tuliptree exists, too.

A favorite quote of mine is "The summit is in the climb" (I don't know who said it). Even if I didn't find a 180 or 190 footer, experiencing the beauty of those mountain side coves and crystal-clear, spring-fed waters made the trip well worth it.
Patrick

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pdbrandt
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Re: Visit to Fork Ridge Tulip Poplar and nearby LIDAR hits

Post by pdbrandt » Mon Apr 21, 2014 9:06 pm

Josh Kelly wrote:Patrick,

I'm looking forward to seeing your route. I doubt the tree in your photo is the same tree. The 17' x 185 individual has a major branch at 57' up the bole and as I mentioned is not particularly well formed. It may be just perspective, but the crown on your 19' x 170' tree seems much more impressive, and I think it is probably a newly documented individual. This photo shows what the Ursa Cage 185 footer looks like in June.

Josh
Josh, I agree that your "Ursa Cage" 185 footer is not the same as my 19' x 170'. The cove for my 19' CBH tree is steeper and the tree itself is right next to a ravine. I sent you the GPS waypoints and my bushwhack path. Hopefully that will help confirm the two trees' uniqueness.
Patrick

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