EAB plot study

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Devin
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Joined: Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:41 pm

EAB plot study

Post by Devin » Sat Jul 20, 2013 9:21 am

GSMNP in cooperation with Arborjet has started a plot study of 40 ash trees in the roaring fork area of the park to determine the most effective systemic chemical towards managing EAB.
Three chemicals being tested:
Tree-age- active ingredient Emamectin Benzoate
Azasol- active ingredient Azadirachtin (water soluable neem-oil)
TreeAzin-active ingredient- Azadirachtin A + Azadirachtin B
The application of TreeAzin was only approved through the use of the Eco-jet system, and application rates proved to be impracticable, taking about 5 hours to treat 4 trees. Transpiration rates and formula viscosity may have something to do with the very slow up-take. The other two chemicals were used with the Arborjet injection system and application was successful. Untreated control trees were implemented as well and holes were drilled into the bole without applying chemical.

It looks like EAB has been in the park for quite some time; many trees around the greenbrier area, roaring fork area (behind Bales cabin), and along route 321 have been infested for many years. Beetles have been collected from trees in the roaring fork area. Many of these trees have dwarfed chlorotic leaves, major dieback, and epicormic sprouts; some are already dead. Unfortunately the cost to treat these trees via these chemicals is extremely expensive, about 500 dollars a liter! Back country ash trees and notable specimens may be soil drenched with imidacloprid as a more practical measure. The park cannot afford to lose another tree species, hopefully we can get these beautiful specimens treated before their demise!
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This baby is gonna be just fine...
This baby is gonna be just fine...
TreeAzin treatment
TreeAzin treatment

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Will Blozan
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Re: EAB plot study

Post by Will Blozan » Sat Jul 20, 2013 9:50 am

Devin,

Thanks for the update. I am in northern Ohio now and the ash are obliterated. There are some seriously significant specimens in the Big Creek and Cataloochee area that we alerted Jesse, Tom, and Kris to. Do you have any idea what the plans are for the superlative specimens? Also, the 160'+ Biltmore ash in Tremont comes to mind.

Will

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Rand
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Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 9:25 pm

Re: EAB plot study

Post by Rand » Sat Jul 20, 2013 12:20 pm

Will Blozan wrote:Devin,

Thanks for the update. I am in northern Ohio now and the ash are obliterated.
Will
You know you have ecological carnage on your hands when your 'Elm-Ash Swamp Forests' contain neither...
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DougBidlack
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Re: EAB plot study

Post by DougBidlack » Mon Jul 22, 2013 8:05 am

Rand,

exactly! Michigan has the very same problem, particularly in the Lake Erie (like Ohio) and Lake Huron lake plains. Also in most river floodplain areas where green ash is the main victim...at least in the southern part of the state. I'm much less familiar with black ash in the northern part of the state but I understand that they are killed very quickly by EAB.

Doug

greenent22
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Re: EAB plot study

Post by greenent22 » Wed Aug 07, 2013 1:10 am

I wonder if one of the Kickstarter/Indiegogo type sites could try to get donations (kickstarter itself isn't for charity work so it wouldn't directly work then again if it was framed as some sort of study and presented people with findings updates, photos of tree they helped to save, it could be allowed, as the salamander study in MA was).

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Will Blozan
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Re: EAB plot study

Post by Will Blozan » Wed Aug 07, 2013 7:51 pm

It is so unfortunate that the time period for people to overcome their apathy about EAB is far longer than the window of opportunity to save them... Not true, fortunately, with hemlock woolly adelgid- but I fear near total annihilation of the scattered ash we have in the Asheville, NC area.

Will

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John Harvey
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Re: EAB plot study

Post by John Harvey » Thu Aug 08, 2013 8:35 am

There is a large pile of firewood that's sitting behind my dads house. Mostly various and small cleared trees from the property where a garden was planted. Anyhow, the other week when I was getting some of this wood to build a fire for the kids to roast marshmallows on, out crawled EAB. I couldn't believe it. There are several ash trees in the area and a couple of the trees cleared were probably ash. What should I even do with the pile, burn it where it stands?
Im going to look through the pile this week to make sure it wasn't green tiger beetle.
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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Will Blozan
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Re: EAB plot study

Post by Will Blozan » Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:34 pm

Is EAB known from the area? If so- let it be. Make sure of the ID first though. Seems like the adults should have emerged already but it could be laying eggs- though I would doubt it would select a dead one.

Will

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John Harvey
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Re: EAB plot study

Post by John Harvey » Thu Aug 08, 2013 7:48 pm

I know there have been EAB reported in NJ although not considered one of the states infested yet so I'm definitely going to look around where I believe I saw it. There are a ton of beautiful ash trees here, I know its inevitable, just hate to lose them. There are some impressive and very old Green and White Ash in this state.
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Old Ash2
Old Ash2
Old Ash1
Old Ash1
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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