Emerald Ash Borer

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Devin
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Emerald Ash Borer

Post by Devin » Sun May 05, 2013 9:39 am

Some pictures of some confirmed EAB infested ash trees in the Greenbrier area of the park. Some trees were completely blasted, others seemed to be hanging in there though declining vigor was visible.
Attachments
DSC04572.JPG
DSC04571.JPG
DSC04570.JPG
"D" shaped boring hole
"D" shaped boring hole

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Rand
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Re: Emerald Ash Borer

Post by Rand » Sun May 05, 2013 1:59 pm

Yeah.... I didn't think all those 'Don't move firewood! Pretty Please!' signs they plastered all over Ohio in 2005 were going to work either...

Here in Columbus, the borer population on the north side of town has been festering for the last 7 years or so and most of the ash trees there died over the last 3 years. In the last 2 years ash trees in my neighborhood have started dropping over in a more or less random fashion. I've read that insects can sense stressed trees and tend to attack them preferentially. I imagine it works like lions separating a wildebeest from the herd.

Joe

Re: Emerald Ash Borer

Post by Joe » Sun May 05, 2013 2:17 pm

It entered Mass. last fall and now the state is quaranteed so nobody can move ash except into other infested areas. And more recently it's been reported in CT and NH.
Joe

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Emerald Ash Borer

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Wed Jul 10, 2013 10:34 pm

Emerald ash borer has recently been confirmed in the southern part of the Allegheny National Forest (to no one's surprise).

I took the attached photo of an ash with dead and dying branches in its crown the other day on a farm in Scandia, Warren County, just west of the northern part of the ANF. The tree is in a wooded area of the farm close to the edge of an open field. Anyone want to venture an educated guess as to whether or not this tree is infested with EAB? I've also sent this photo to one of the ANF's scientists.

(I found a similarly declining ash tree in another person's back yard in Scandia maybe two miles northeast from this one, no photo though.)
100_1332.JPG
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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Rand
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Re: Emerald Ash Borer

Post by Rand » Thu Jul 11, 2013 5:15 am

I would guess that it is. I think I see epicormic sprouting lower down on the limbs, which is highly diagnostic. The bugs' borings girdle the branches so the tree tries to sprout below the damage. Small trees will sprout at the ground level and may survive the death of the crown. I guess we'll see if the ash can survive American Chestnut style.

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Emerald Ash Borer

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Thu Jul 11, 2013 3:35 pm

One after another. We keep plucking strings out of the web. At some point the whole thing is going to collapse. I hope I'm not around to see it.

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Emerald Ash Borer

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Sun Jul 21, 2013 8:58 am

Here's the message I got back from the USFS about that ash photo:
Yes, that could be decline due to EAB. EAB was just confirmed in Warren County. I am trying to determine exactly where that specimen was found. I’ve been noticing a number of smaller diameter ash, 4-8” diameter in the Warren and Youngsville area that are dying off- looks like the EAB caused mortality that I observed along I-79 in the Cranberry area.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

greenent22
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Re: Emerald Ash Borer

Post by greenent22 » Wed Aug 07, 2013 1:07 am

Ugh. We aren't even done getting over the hemlock (or the chestnut and elm) and now the fabled White Ash. :(

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pattyjenkins1
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Re: Emerald Ash Borer

Post by pattyjenkins1 » Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:11 am

A brief article about the EAB and woodpeckers from the newest issue of Living Bird, a journal of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology:
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/page.aspx? ... go721PrZrV

patty
Patty Jenkins
Executive Director
Tree Climbers International, Inc.
Get High / Climb Trees

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Rand
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Re: Emerald Ash Borer

Post by Rand » Tue Aug 13, 2013 2:33 pm

Yeah, I see that a lot with ash trees around here. At some point they just get riddled with woodpecker holes, scaled bark, etc. Problem is, the damage has already been done, and the trees die a season or two later.

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