Kiss your ash goodbye...

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Don
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Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:42 am

Re: Kiss your ash goodbye...

Post by Don » Sun Jun 10, 2012 2:02 pm

JRS
Nurture that side of you that seeks out the positive aspect of climate changing, where new opportunities arise...otherwise you're the proverbial hound that howls at the thorn in his paw, and does little about it...;>}
DRB


jamesrobertsmith wrote:What the hell are we supposed to do? This is getting more depressing the older I get. I despair of seeing an end to the troubles for our wild places.
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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Will Blozan
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Re: Kiss your ash goodbye...

Post by Will Blozan » Sun Jun 10, 2012 3:29 pm

Don,

If only HWA, EAB, ALB, DED, were a result of climate change...

Will

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Kiss your ash goodbye...

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Sun Jun 10, 2012 5:37 pm

What I have done--and it seems to be the only thing that can be done--is to seek out the remaining threatened places and species to witness them before they succumb. That's what I did in the Smokies when I first heard that HWA had hit the Park. I hiked and bushwhacked to see many old growth groves of hemlocks, and now they're dead. I suggest that anyone wishing to see our wild places, wilderness areas, and threatened species do the same. Because I guarantee you that they're all going to vanish in the next few decades.

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Mark Collins
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Re: Kiss your ash goodbye...

Post by Mark Collins » Sun Jun 10, 2012 11:07 pm

This is very worrisome. I used to live in Asheville N.C. and spent many, many hours hiking in the Pisgah. This was back in 2006, 2007. The hemlock woolly adelgid was really ravaging the hemlocks at that time, but they still seemed to be alive. I was shocked to see a recent picture that showed dead trees as far as the eye could see. My first thought was "What's going to happen with all of that dead timber?"

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Don
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Re: Kiss your ash goodbye...

Post by Don » Wed Jun 13, 2012 11:07 am

Will-
You apparently think otherwise? Out West, the few degrees average temps warmer, seem to be all it takes to release those pathogens that were formerly held back by once colder winters. What do your significant observations suggest?
-Don


Will Blozan wrote:Don,

If only HWA, EAB, ALB, DED, were a result of climate change...

Will
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

User avatar
Will Blozan
Posts: 1153
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:13 pm

Re: Kiss your ash goodbye...

Post by Will Blozan » Wed Jun 13, 2012 7:35 pm

Don,

All I mentioned, along with Chestnut blight (and many others), are human introduced pathogens or insects that have nothing to do with warming. Some, like HWA will have a greater impact as winters become more mild, but the initial infestation was totally a human introduction to this country.

Will

greenent22
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Joined: Sun Oct 24, 2010 12:23 am

Re: Kiss your ash goodbye...

Post by greenent22 » Sat Sep 22, 2012 11:07 pm

Oh nooo!!!!!! Can't believe. The Hemlocks were too horrible to comprehend but now the fabled White Ash too????
And the amazing chestnuts were already lost before my time and I'm sure they had some mega OG beauties in the Smokies, maybe in the western part too.

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