Fork Ridge Tuliptree- new eastern height record!!!

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morgan
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Re: Fork Ridge Tuliptree- new eastern height record!!!

Post by morgan » Sun May 17, 2015 10:31 pm

Thanks. I've always been a big fan of tuliptrees but they are not endemic this far north (Adirondacks of NY). About the farthest north you see them is Kingston NY or Poughkeepsie, and the ones planted up here don't thrive because they bloom in late May and don't get very big. Down in New York City the tuliptrees are huge, it's much warmer down there, and they are very common there.

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tomhoward
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Re: Fork Ridge Tuliptree- new eastern height record!!!

Post by tomhoward » Mon May 18, 2015 7:55 pm

Rochester is in western NY. I've never seen the National Champion Red Oak in Monroe County, but it looks like an impressive tree. It's clearly at least a double - maybe even 2 individual trees that have grown together (in North Syracuse where I live is a huge double Red Oak by South Bay Rd. in North Syracuse Cemetery that is actually 2 individual trees that have grown together). The other large oaks in this thread are single-trunked trees. The largest single-trunked oak Elijah Whitcomb and I saw in Rochester is a 19 ft. 1 in. cbh tree 89 ft. tall in Mt. Hope Cemetery.

Tom Howard

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tomhoward
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Re: Fork Ridge Tuliptree- new eastern height record!!!

Post by tomhoward » Mon May 18, 2015 8:02 pm

Wrong reply - this is supposed to be about big oaks in NY

Here is my reply about the Tuliptrees in upstate NY - The Syracuse area where I live is farther north than Kingston, and Tuliptree reaches significant size in this area. Green lakes State Park near here has the tallest Tuliptrees possibly for this far north - several trees over 140 ft. tall (and to 4 ft. or more dbh), with the tallest Tuliptree 148 ft. tall. These are the tallest trees in the whole central NY area, and the tallest in NY State for so far north (except some White Pines over 150 ft. tall in the Adirondacks).

Tom Howard

morgan
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Re: Fork Ridge Tuliptree- new eastern height record!!!

Post by morgan » Thu May 21, 2015 11:20 am

Why do people love to argue so much? Go check out any range map for tuliptree and you will see they are not endemic in eastern NY north of Kingston. Not talking about western NY or central NY.

Syracuse is MUCH warmer than the Adirondacks. We get -30 and -40 here all the time.

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Fork Ridge Tuliptree- new eastern height record!!!

Post by Erik Danielsen » Thu May 21, 2015 5:35 pm

Tom's response was not unreasonable. You stated "further north than Kingston," which is not true if Syracuse is further north. If you specify "eastern ny" it may well be true, but that was in no way discernable from the post Tom responded to.

morgan
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Re: Fork Ridge Tuliptree- new eastern height record!!!

Post by morgan » Sun May 24, 2015 5:51 pm

Syracuse is far west of Kingston, in the Great Lakes region, where the climate is heavily modified by the lakes. Kingston is not. The argument is without merit.

Outer Mongonia is farther north than Kingston also.

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Don
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Re: Fork Ridge Tuliptree- new eastern height record!!!

Post by Don » Mon May 25, 2015 12:25 am

Have we yet fully highjacked the original Fork Ridge Tuliptree thread?
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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Fork Ridge Tuliptree- new eastern height record!!!

Post by Erik Danielsen » Tue May 26, 2015 1:29 pm

Morgan, while the climate is modified by the lakes, the latitude is not, and that is specifically what was contested. If you want to correct your original statement for clarity that is all well and good, there is obviously room for an understanding to be met, but to accuse Tom of being needlessly argumentative is uncalled for.

I agree with Don, can anyone with mod powers merge the divergent comments into the more relevant "natural range of liriodendron" thread that's running?

morgan
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Re: Fork Ridge Tuliptree- new eastern height record!!!

Post by morgan » Wed May 27, 2015 2:48 am

I said there are no tuliptrees in the Adirondacks, because it's too far north. This is a true statement. I also said the farthest north tuliptrees get (in the direction of the Adirondacks) is Kingston. This is another true statement.

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dbhguru
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Re: Fork Ridge Tuliptree- new eastern height record!!!

Post by dbhguru » Wed May 27, 2015 9:26 am

Tuliptree Aficionados,

There is small number of tuliptrees growing in Argyle, NY in the edge of a woodland near a field. The latitude is 43 degrees and 14 minutes north. Locals know about the trees, but not their origin. There are also tuliptrees growing at a site in Pownal VT just across the NY order at 42 degrees 48 minutes north. The Hudson River corridor and the predominance of farmlands with wooded boundaries allows the species to establish itself very sparingly between 42 and 43 degrees north.

In fact, east of the Great Lakes, at latitudes between 42 and 43 degrees and low elevations, the inland rivers corridors are the avenues by which the species maintained its historical presence. Give Liriodendron some sunlight and space to grow and it can compete with nearby woodland species, but it will not compete with sugar maple, beech, hemlock, and other species in a pure woodland setting. Openings have to be established. Of course such openings are common the Hudson and Connecticut River Valleys and their larger tributaries.

In the last two decades, I've seen an expansion of the tuliptree's range. Our home sets at 42.35 degrees latitude and at an elevation of about 290 feet, and here, we are at the northeastern limit of its range. However, I believe that TT's range will creep northward unless the climate warming reverses.

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