New City and state Co-Champion Poplar

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pattyjenkins1
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New City and state Co-Champion Poplar

Post by pattyjenkins1 » Wed May 27, 2015 6:21 pm

Last Saturday, we got a call from a homeowner reporting a tulip tree that was measured at 70" diameter by an arborist. 70"!! That number prompted me to call Eli, and so Eli, Peter and I went to see it on Monday. Eli's email to me on Tuesday morning:

What a great tree! I'm still in awe. Tree data from yesterday:
cbh: 230.5"
height: 135.6' (probably taller, will remeasure after leaf drop)
avg. crown spread: 105'
TOTAL big tree points: 392 (easily qualifies as outright city champion and state co-champion)

...next biggest tulip (the one at Emory that Peter has climbed) is 368 points.... and I NEVER thought it would be beaten by another city tree!

I've nominated the tree to the state champion list... .


Hooray for Eli, and for accurate tree measuring methodology, and for a gorgeous new city champion poplar. If it were a bird, I'd add it to my life list.

psj
Patty Jenkins
Executive Director
Tree Climbers International, Inc.
Get High / Climb Trees

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eliahd24
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Re: New City and state Co-Champion Poplar

Post by eliahd24 » Thu May 28, 2015 11:58 am

Here are some pictures of the tree. It's a beauty for sure... not sure how to rotate the photo's... they show as vertical on my PC.

~Eli
Attachments
Tulip 3.JPG
Tulip 2.JPG
Tulip 1.JPG

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Larry Tucei
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Re: New City and state Co-Champion Poplar

Post by Larry Tucei » Thu May 28, 2015 12:29 pm

Last Saturday, we got a call from a homeowner reporting a tulip tree that was measured at 70" diameter by an arborist. 70"!! That number prompted me to call Eli, and so Eli, Peter and I went to see it on Monday. Eli's email to me on Tuesday morning:

What a great tree! I'm still in awe. Tree data from yesterday:
cbh: 230.5"
height: 135.6' (probably taller, will remeasure after leaf drop)
avg. crown spread: 105'
TOTAL big tree points: 392 (easily qualifies as outright city champion and state co-champion)

...next biggest tulip (the one at Emory that Peter has climbed) is 368 points.... and I NEVER thought it would be beaten by another city tree!

I've nominated the tree to the state champion list... .

Hooray for Eli, and for accurate tree measuring methodology, and for a gorgeous new city champion poplar. If it were a bird, I'd add it to my life list.

Eli-Patty- Wow a really big Poplar!! What a beauty!! I saved the photos then rotated them- hope you don't mind. Larry
Attachments
Tulip%203.JPG
Tulip%202.JPG
Tulip%201.JPG

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Bart Bouricius
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Re: New City and state Co-Champion Poplar

Post by Bart Bouricius » Fri May 29, 2015 11:13 am

Very impressive Tulip. If it was open grown, it would probably have a wider crown spread, however it would probably also be shorter. Do keep in mind folks, that when you call these trees poplars you confuse people. Folks from the North East and even the South East often tell me that this tree is a Poplar (Populus species because of the Yellow Poplar moniker. I suppose changing language will always be an uphill battle though, just like with the trees called "Cedro" (Ceder) trees in Central and South America that are not even conifers.

tclikesbigtrees
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Re: New City and state Co-Champion Poplar

Post by tclikesbigtrees » Fri May 29, 2015 3:50 pm

I agree Bart. They are Tulip Trees and will always be Tulip Trees. I don't understand why people don't just call them Tulip Trees. They are not Poplars, no matter how many times they are referred to as such.

Tom

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dbhguru
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Re: New City and state Co-Champion Poplar

Post by dbhguru » Thu Jun 04, 2015 7:14 pm

Bart, Tom, Larry, et.al.,

I grew up in the southern Appalachians where tulip trees were only known as yellow poplar or yellow-poplar. Confusion on family, genus, and species based on superficial similarity of wood isn't likely to fade any time soon. Ideally, we'd all use the Latin names, but some of them are really mouthfulls. Scan down any botanical list of scientific names and see how many you'd want to go around spitting out in normal conversation.

I acknowledge that some names are easy and musical sounding to pronounce. I especially like Liriodendron tulipifera or Liriodendron for short. Another I sort of like is Liquidamber styraciflua or Liquidamber for short. But I doubt you'll hear me say Cercidiphyllum japonicum instead of Katsua. Or I doubt that I'll be inclined to spit out Spathodea campanulata instead of African tulip tree.

Providing the Latin names in our communications eliminates confusion, and I'm all for that, but some of the names really are challenges to pronounce. Oh well! Just the way it is. Or read http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net/Pronunciation.htm and pronounce the names any way you like.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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eliahd24
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Re: New City and state Co-Champion Poplar

Post by eliahd24 » Thu Jun 11, 2015 8:18 am

I hear everyone on the discussions of problematic common names. Rest assured that in all of my data sheets and official lists I list Latin nomenclature at a minimum, and usually add a common name as well. Funny how I was initially taught "tulip poplar", but Bob was taught "yellow poplar"... still other folks were taught "tuliptree"... For me, the common name I associate with a tree is generally from the person who first taught me the tree while walking in the woods together...

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Bart Bouricius
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Re: New City and state Co-Champion Poplar

Post by Bart Bouricius » Fri Jun 12, 2015 6:37 am

Even though common names can be confusing regarding correct taxonomy, in my searching for big trees in Central and South America, it is critical to know the common name that is used for these trees in order to talk to people about them, as Sideroxylon portoricense will get you no where when talking about the "Tempisque" tree in Costa Rica. This magnificent tree was nearly exterminated for use in railroad ties when United Fruit, now Chiquita Brands, built the railroads to get fruit to the ports in this country. To work with local people, taxonomists working in the Neotropics have established data bases of country and regional common names, which are critical for doing their work.

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