Atlanta, GA Rucker Index reaches 143.1'

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eliahd24
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Atlanta, GA Rucker Index reaches 143.1'

Post by eliahd24 » Fri Feb 07, 2014 2:30 pm

Atlanta's Rucker Index is now 143.1'. Pretty impressive. I've also attached a file that goes far deeper down the list to include and R20 and R50 average. It's worth noting that I've found 47 different species of trees in Atlanta that top 100' and 8 of those are over 140' with the recent addition of a super tall and gangly Sycamore. I suspect there are taller Loblollies and some taller Hickory and Oak species as well... just gotta find them.

Species Common name CBH' Height'
Liriodendron tulipifera Tulip Poplar 164.3'
Pinus taeda Loblolly Pine 9.63' x 144.4'
Carya glabra Pignut Hickory 6.70' x 143.7'
Quercus alba White Oak 8.33' x 143.2'
Quercus shumardii Shumard Oak 7.13' x 141.0'
Liquidambar styraciflua Sweetgum 140.3'
Platanus occidentalis Am. Sycamore 5.85' x 140.3'
Quercus rubra N. Red Oak 10.33' x 140.0'
Fagus grandifolia American Beech 139.8'
Carya cordiformis Bitternut Hickory 5.50' x 133.9'
RUCKER 10 Index (average of top 10 species): 143.1'

*it should be noted that for my R20 and R50 lists, I included non-native trees as well.... but tried to stray away from invasives (Tree of Heaven, Mimosa, etc.)

~Eli
Attachments
Atlanta Rucker Index_2.7.14.xlsx
Atlanta Rucker Index 2.7.14
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Larry Tucei
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Re: Atlanta, GA Rucker Index reaches 143.1'

Post by Larry Tucei » Fri Feb 07, 2014 5:30 pm

Eli- Impressive heights for city trees they are taller than the trees I find in the Forest in Ms. You have something started. I don't believe many cities have Rucker Indecies. Larry

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bbeduhn
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Re: Atlanta, GA Rucker Index reaches 143.1'

Post by bbeduhn » Fri Feb 07, 2014 5:39 pm

Eli,
Outstanding work over the last several years! I'm especially impressed with the sourwood, hornbeam, hophornbeam and dogwood. I'm glad to see a few exotics as well, especially the dawn and the rare in the east, coast redwood. The deodar is impressive in height. The beech, white oak and pignut are quite tall. One minor note-the red hickory should be ovalis.
Brian

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eliahd24
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Re: Atlanta, GA Rucker Index reaches 143.1'

Post by eliahd24 » Fri Feb 07, 2014 6:41 pm

Good catch Brian. I appreciate any feedback other NTSers can offer.

Larry- though these trees are "in Atlanta"... rest assured they are almost ALL in forests. This city just happens to be blessed with chunks of mature (and some old growth) forest hidden amongst the neighborhoods and skyscrapers.

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bbeduhn
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Re: Atlanta, GA Rucker Index reaches 143.1'

Post by bbeduhn » Fri Feb 07, 2014 9:24 pm

I overlooked the 131' shortleaf. Very nice.

Two more...Michauxii is swamp chestnut and ostrya is hophornbeam. I was just called out for using ostrya for persimmon. They really should teach Latin in school!

samson'sseed
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Re: Atlanta, GA Rucker Index reaches 143.1'

Post by samson'sseed » Sat Feb 08, 2014 9:31 am

Have you looked around the Soapstone Ridge area?

This area was never farmed because it was too rocky, and it might harbor some old growth trees.

I don't know if there are even any parks near here, but it wasn't developed for residential use until the 1990s. The terrain was too rugged even for that but it finally became worth it for real estate developers fairly recently.

I doubt they removed many trees.

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Steve Galehouse
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Re: Atlanta, GA Rucker Index reaches 143.1'

Post by Steve Galehouse » Sat Feb 08, 2014 7:27 pm

Eli, NTS-

I think in many parts of the eastern, southern, and mid-western states the tallest and sometimes fattest trees are found in or near urban areas. The Atlanta Rucker indices are similar to the Akron, OH indices(RH 10,142.76; RH 20,132.58). I think the occurrence of tall or large trees is related to when park-lands were set aside for the public, and not allowed to go through a series of timber harvests or agriculture usage. Many of the parks in the Akron area were estates of industrialists from the early 20th century, and these areas have had time to re-grow and produce nice trees. I think potential tall tree sites in more rural areas were/are more prone to utilized for timber/firewood production, and thus don't display the size of trees that might be expected. Therefore, in my opinion, It isn't necessary to travel into the hinterlands to find good trees---they are probably right near where you live.

Steve
every plant is native somewhere

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Atlanta, GA Rucker Index reaches 143.1'

Post by Matt Markworth » Sun Feb 09, 2014 11:57 am

Eli,

Awesome accomplishment!

It looks like the Flowering Dogwood is the tallest that we've measured. Is it open grown or forest grown?

Matt

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eliahd24
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Re: Atlanta, GA Rucker Index reaches 143.1'

Post by eliahd24 » Mon Mar 03, 2014 4:06 pm

Forest grown Matt. It's a biggie, though not all that pretty. Sorry for the delayed response.

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eliahd24
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Re: Atlanta, GA Rucker Index reaches 143.1'

Post by eliahd24 » Mon Mar 03, 2014 4:07 pm

Steve- I absolutely agree. The growth of Atlanta, in a weird way, saved many of these tall tree preserves across the city.

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