A Trip to Durango, CO

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Matt Markworth
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A Trip to Durango, CO

Post by Matt Markworth » Mon Aug 18, 2014 4:37 pm

All,

I went to Durango because of Bob Leverett’s warm invitation. Based on all the folks that travelled from far and wide to attend the conference, many others took him up on his warm invitation as well. I went to Durango to see the majestic San Juan Mountains. I went to Durango to meet other members of the Native Tree Society, and to see what I could learn from them, and to make new friends. I went to Durango to find tall trees. I stayed for 17 days.

Friday, Aug 1st

I got set up at the Hermosa Creek Campground in the San Juan National Forest. That first evening I took my first hike of many down the Hermosa Creek Trail. The ancient, gnarly ponderosa pine (144’ x 10’2.5”) residing in the first gulch along the trail was my first taste of how each of the ancient trees of Hermosa takes on a character of its own.

Saturday, Aug 2nd

Bob Leverett organized a meet up at Coal Bank Pass on Engineer Mountain to document Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir at high elevation. This was my first opportunity to meet the great Bob Van Pelt. With Will Blozan and Bob Leverett there as well, there was an unbelievable brain trust of tree knowledge on the mountain that day! Others from Durango were there as well. Bob Leverett showed us the impressive Engelmann spruce not far from the parking lot and then Will and I went down farther into the drainage. I went to the other side of the drainage and kept descending, while checking out the heights on the way down. The best heights I got down there were from 120’ to 131’, nothing close to the fine specimen that Bob showed us. The scene unfolded in front of me, Engelmann spruce giving way to an open mountain meadow with wildflowers, which gave way to majestic Twilight Peak in the background. The mountain’s power was also made evident by the wreckage of decades-old automobiles that had careened off the highway far above. Well, apparently I wasn’t keeping track of time and I had kept the party waiting up by the parking lot for a period of time. (Give this Midwesterner a taste of the mountains and he may get swept away a little bit:)) Luckily there was good cell phone coverage and I asked that they go ahead up the mountain and I would catch up.

The Engelmanns and the lush forest floor above 11,000’ were amazing – an environment I had never seen before. There was even a bonsai tree growing on a boulder that caught our attention. Will was ready to make some new discoveries and he headed off trail on the north facing slope. He soon called for us to join him and there stood a girthy 137.5’ Engelmann spruce, surpassing Bob’s previous record for height at that elevation. The tallest tree that I found near that elevation was a 133.5’ Engelmann. Will also found a tall subalpine fir measuring 118.5’, also above 11,000’ in elevation.

Later that evening I went mountain biking on the Colorado Trail. I probably over did it a bit on my first full day at high elevation and had some pretty severe leg cramps that night. But, luckily that was my only symptom of getting acclimated to the altitude.

Sunday, Aug 3rd

In the morning, I spotted NTS Member Chris from Nevada hitting the Hermosa Creek Trailhead and I let him know I’d catch up with him a little later on my mountain bike. After catching up, we continued hiking up the trail. As we approached Stony Gulch, we spotted the huge Larry Tucei Pine. This huge pine (the biggest one I would see on the entire trip) was a perfect opportunity to show Chris how to use the laser.

Crossing over Dutch Creek and rounding the corner, a towering ponderosa pine resides just a little way upslope. Chris has an eagle eye, as he instantly knew it was extremely tall. I pulled out the Trupulse 200 and Chris provided a target to the trunk. Measuring 162.3’ x 8’7”, it became the tallest known Pinus ponderosa subsp. Scopulorum across its range. I hiked upslope above the tree and found a small rock formation with water trickling from underneath. Chris noticed a cottonwood growing nearby. The tree will be known as the Rouw Ponderosa Pine. Mark has been measuring trees since 1973 - wow! I also learned the next day that Mark spotted the tree last year, but didn’t have time to do a full measurement, but he knew it was tall. When visiting family in Missouri, I hope to take a day trip up to Iowa and have Mark show me some of the big trees up there.

We walked down to Hermosa Creek, had lunch, and drank from Dutch Creek (thanks for the UV treatment Chris). We hiked back out and relaxed before the conference was set to start the next morning.

Monday, Aug 4th, Tuesday, Aug 5th

The Southwest Old Growth Conference was held on these two days. The presenters represented the very best of the best, and I think it will be long remembered as an excellent event. I absorbed a lot and gained an appreciation for the level of commitment that it takes for the attending scientists to make the contributions that they make. It really is their life’s work. I won’t even attempt to summarize any of their presentations. It was also a good reminder for me that as a citizen scientist, I should continue to focus on “micro” activities (like measuring a tree), and leave the “macro” analysis to the true experts. I think that the citizen scientist has a lot to offer, especially when it comes to collecting data points out in the field. Bob served as an excellent “Master of Ceremonies,” as the Durango Herald put it, and I appreciate all of his work in setting up a successful conference in which citizens of all levels of expertise were welcome and felt right at home.

Beyond the presentations, the other huge benefit is all the conversations during breaks, lunches, and dinners, and all the great people that you meet. This is the main reason that I highly encourage all NTS to attend conferences/rendezvous whenever possible. NTS folks and tree climbers are by far the most welcoming, fun to be around people that I have ever met. It was great seeing Peter and Patty again. Having the opportunity to hang out with BVP, with his great stories and his absolute encyclopedia of knowledge about trees was unforgettable. I enjoyed hearing Bart and Connie talk more about the forests in Central America. It was a privilege to see Will again and meet his family, and it’s always an honor to see Bob and Monica. It was great meeting Chris and I appreciate his companionship at the campground. Larry is a blast to be around, thanks for the good times Larry! Mark has a wealth of knowledge about the San Juans and it was great to be out in the field with him. Dave Stahle, Lee Frelich, and Don Bragg were also a pleasure to be around and I greatly enjoyed their presentations. It was really nice seeing Steve Colburn again too. All the folks I met at the Mountain Studies Institute were awesome and I greatly enjoyed Laurie Swisher’s presentation; it really helps to get their local perspective of the issues facing the forests out there. It was also a pleasure to be around outfitter Sandy Young and to get her local perspective. Leah Sloan from American Forests is super interesting to be around. I’m sure I’ve left some people out, but there were so many interesting people and so many memories that I have; my apologies to those that I missed.

Wednesday, Aug 6th

This was a great day of adventure. Outfitter Sandy Young took four of us (Will, Larry, Chris and me) out on horseback and Mark, Laurie Swisher, and Nikki made the trek on foot. Thanks to Bob for coordinating with Sandy to get this set up, and a special thanks to Sandy for her generosity and hospitality. Her horses were easy to ride (except maybe Curly, right Larry?!). Sandy was super cool and wanted us to get off horse and explore areas where we saw potential. This was Will’s one and only day in Hermosa and his eagle eye was our most significant advantage.

We took the horses off trail up Jones Creek a ways and measured some nice trees, but no records yet. Chris and I had measured some nice blue spruce in Stony Gulch a few days before and this gulch would be our next stop. Will, Larry, and Chris took off down the gulch, while Mark and I used our lasers from up above. Stony Gulch really delivered. The first record of the day came with a 164’ blue spruce, the tallest know across its range at that point in time. Actually, there are two 164’ blue spruce in the gulch, one dead and one alive. Will commented that within two hours we would break the blue spruce record again, and he was right! The second record in Stony came with an impressive 157.5’ x 10’6” white fir, the tallest known in Colorado at the time.

Jumping back on the horses, we continued and veered onto the Dutch Creek Trail for a rendezvous with the 17’ circumference Doug fir. Riding along high above the north side of Dutch Creek, I heard Will say something about a double-topped blue spruce far in the distance, and that if it goes all the way to the creek bottom then it will be super tall. And, indeed it was! It should be a National Co-Champion. (This tree would end up having the most points of any blue spruce that NTS found during the Colorado trip. We found 2 or 3 blue spruce that will probably be National Co-Champions with the Utah tree, although the Utah tree doesn’t show a measurement within the last 10 years.) We helped Will with the measurements and all eight of us marveled at the magnificent spruce. After some additional looking down the creek, we got back on the horses and headed to the big Doug fir.

Wow, what an impressive Doug fir! Will commented that its size is in the same range as the largest eastern hemlocks. The most interesting thing to me is that the tree seems to be a complete anomaly. It’s on a bench, and doesn’t have a visible water supply, so it must be tapping a good source down below. It is substantially larger that any tree I would see on the trip; nothing else came close. I hope the day comes when one of us finds a comparable tree in the San Juans…it must be out there. Many photos later, the guys decided to walk the rest of Dutch Creek down to its intersection with the Hermosa Creek Trail, and the ladies were kind enough to bring the horses down the Dutch Creek Trail and meet up with us downstream. Sandy said we were like “kids in a candy store.”

Thursday, Aug 7th

By this time, most of the conference attendees already had to leave town, but we still had a strong NTS contingent for the next two days. Mark had some ideas on places to check out, and we expanded our measuring beyond Hermosa Creek. Mark, Larry, Chris, and I headed over to the Piedra River after getting some breakfast. Driving deep into the national forest, we spotted some nice looking trees in a place called Horse Creek. We couldn’t match the numbers from Hermosa, but we found some really nice Doug fir and blue spruce. We then proceeded to the Piedra River, and although it’s a beautiful, remote place, we didn’t spot any superlative trees. The trail was on the south facing slope, so we were on the drier side, and we didn’t measure anything exceptional from what we could see on the north facing slope. No records, but a day spent measuring with friends is never a bad day.

Friday, Aug 8th

The four of us set out again for another great journey. Mark told of us a great, remote destination and I drove us on the 1 ½ hour rocky ride past the Junction Creek Campground all the way to the western side of the Hermosa drainage. We set out along the Clear Creek Trail (which fades in and out a lot), lost a lot of elevation, and a couple hours later we dropped down a side creek as a way to get to Clear Creek. We started to find some really nice Engelmann spruce. The star of the show was a towering, rocket ship of an Engelmann measuring 152.5’ x 9’7”, a new Engelmann spruce height record for Colorado. It resides at an elevation of 8,927’. Many, many thanks to Chris and Larry for venturing down into the gulch to get CBH/spread, while Mark and I put the Trupulses to good use from up above. I’m sure all of us will always remember the name we assigned to this place – Bushwhack Gulch:) We travelled down Clear Creek until the agreed upon time to turn around arrived. Chris led the way back as we had to regain all of that lost elevation. Larry, remember what my Clif Bar wrapper said? Embrace the Climb!

Saturday, Aug 9th

This would be my first day of exploration without the welcome company of my NTS comrades. With Hermosa at my doorstep, I set out on mountain bike down the trail. I passed several side creeks and made the long descent down to Dutch Creek, and over to Hermosa Creek. Crossing on foot through the cold waters of the Hermosa Creek, I began to head up the Clear Creek Trail. Shortly thereafter, I spotted a pair of quaking aspens, one of which became the tallest known in CO at 115’. Heading farther up, a huge broken off blue spruce revealed a CBH of 13’2”. The soil was extremely rich and reminded me of a deep floodplain. If this huge blue spruce called this home, then there could be more! A little farther up, a big blue spruce stands guard over the trail and over the creek. With ample sunlight, some protection from wind, and a sweet spot in the floodplain, the Clear Creek Blue Spruce (155.5’ x 155” x 33.5’) found itself a great home.

Continuing on and travelling up a cove on the north facing side of Clear Creek, I didn’t see anything comparable to the giants down by the creek. I did see a lot of great places for camping though. Some hunting camps even provide a picnic table and water sources are plenty. I think that a backpacking trip may be the ideal way to survey the trees of Hermosa, as it would save a lot of time of running up and down the Hermosa Creek Trail each day.

Sunday, Aug 10th

I decided to utilize the same strategy as the day before and I travelled by mountain bike all the way up to South Fork, which is on the western side of Hermosa and is the next major tributary north of Clear Creek. I was getting beat up by all the rocks on the trail and it was at this time that I would have preferred to be on foot. The South Fork Trail conveniently provides a bridge across Hermosa Creek and I parked my bike there before ascending the trail. This is more of a major tributary compared to the other creeks I had seen and resembled more of a canyon. I couldn’t get direct access to the creek bottom and was forced to follow the trail along the cliff side. This area may hold some big trees, but I was too far up to get a good vantage point. Scenery was amazing though, and a long day in the mountains, even without measuring many trees, was still a great way to spend the day.

Monday, Aug 11th

After the long trek on Sunday, Monday brought a change of strategy. The side creek bottoms within closer distance would be the next area to check out. I descended off trail, down the creek bottom of Jones Creek. A lot of debris collects in the bottom of these gulches. I unearthed an old horse saddle with a lot of cool detail on it. It was in pieces, and I left it there to keep disintegrating. Farther down, a white fir claimed the record for the tallest known of its species outside of the Sierra Nevada at 162.4’. Based on all of Bob’s discoveries on Jones Creek, and the fact that those discoveries played a big role in setting off the chain of events that led to Hermosa being known as tall tree country, I named this Jones Creek find the Leverett White Fir.

Continuing down Jones Creek, the creek has a sheer drop off making Hermosa Creek rather inaccessible at this point. I crossed over high above Hermosa Creek to Swampy Creek. Swampy really earns its name. Surface water flows in a relatively wide area. This area is very thick with vegetation making measurement more difficult. I did get a towering blue spruce to 158’. A couple Doug firs litter the forest floor with DBH’s in the range of 4’. This area deserves more exploration.

Tuesday, Aug 12th

This day brought a “break” from tree measuring and I hopped in the car. Travelling north on 550, I crossed over Coal Bank Pass and headed on to Silverton. The Million Dollar Highway between Silverton and Ouray is spectacular. If you’re in the area, then this drive cannot be missed. Steep cliffs without guardrails line portions of the drive. I never knew mountains could take on such colors. Other towns dot the landscape between Ouray and Telluride, with Telluride being another gem. It seems a bit touristy, and I would probably avoid it on weekends, but the scenery is out of this world with mountains rising all around the town. I turned on to a gravel road and came in above the high elevation airport. A photographer would have a field day out here.

On the way back, it was a bit humorous watching people drive the mountain roads. I kept my distance from someone that was actually driving on the wrong side of a curvy road because they wanted to stay away from the cliff side. That was a disaster waiting to happen.

Wednesday, Aug 13th

This day brought me back to the Hermosa Creek Trail. Making the descent down Stony Gulch, I finally found a closer way to Hermosa Creek without encountering cliffs. Within five minutes of being at Hermosa Creek, I spotted a 162’ blue spruce across the creek. This tree was a welcome sign that the western side of the Hermosa drainage can support 160’+ trees. The forecasted rain rolled in and I headed back up. With an aversion to tent camping in the rain, and with steady rain forecasted for the next 24 hours, I took down the tent in the rain and drove out, saying my goodbyes to Hermosa for this trip.

My plan was to drive south or west and find somewhere dry. My first choice was to move to Mesa Verde, but it was raining there too. While I was out that way, I went ahead and checked out the Four Corners. It was amusing watching the tourists (I realize I was one too:)). I headed away from Colorado and then had a decision to make. To the left was New Mexico and to the right was Utah. Both had camping opportunities with a bit of drive. The Utah sky looked pretty dark, so New Mexico it was. I can’t get over how stark the landscapes are in the Ute territory in CO and the Navajo territory in NM. A tumbleweed actually crossed in front of my path. With rain seemingly all throughout the forested areas within my driving distance, and daylight running short, I headed back north through Shiprock and back into CO. I found a place to stay in Durango and stayed there for the next four nights. In a future trip, I hope to visit some of the forested areas of NM.

Thursday, Aug 14th

Well, Hermosa called me back and my motivation level seemed higher than ever. I set out in the rain down the second cattle guard and hiked/slid my way down. I wanted to see what this section of Hermosa Creek could produce, knowing that it would have been more accessible to logging in the past. After walking quite a ways up stream, I came to the conclusion that it probably had been logged and I came back up, still south of the campground, through two cliff faces. I’ve never been so appreciative of having vegetation (mostly Gambel oak) for footholds and handholds. It was time to revisit the strategy of checking out the lower reaches of the side creeks that drain into Hermosa Creek.

I’m glad I came back to Hermosa. Her beauty and awesome tree growing potential were on full display on this day. Sunshine prevailed in the afternoon and I would measure the tallest tree that I ever have. Navigating another drop off, I descended down a steep slope in to the recesses. A double-topped Colorado blue spruce revealed itself. Memories of Will’s find a week before flashed through my mind. If the tree extended to the very bottom, like Will’s did, then what a tree it would be! Continuing down the creek and approaching the trunk, with the top no longer visible, I shot the laser to the highest point that I could see and got over 170’. This would be Colorado’s tallest known tree of any species and the tallest known blue spruce across its range. I wrapped the tape at breast height for a good target for the Trupulse 200. Climbing the south facing slope provided a perfect view all the way to the bottom and all the way to the top. The height came in at 178.8’. I sat and admired the tree, got a few more shots to the tape and to the top to confirm the height and gave Bob a call. “Bob,” I said. “Are you sitting down?”

Friday, Aug 15th

In the morning, I checked out a creek near the campground without seeing a lot, so I headed back to the tall blue spruce to get better photos. Colorado’s tallest known tree will be called The Protect Hermosa Tree. Hermosa is the largest unprotected roadless area in Colorado and the bill seems to be stalled out in Congress. Maybe this recognition will help out some, even if just a little. This tree is way off trail down a pretty steep slope, and combined with the fact that most people wouldn’t know where to look, I don’t have a lot of concern that the tree will suffer from foot traffic if it gains some notoriety.

On the way to The Protect Hermosa Tree, I dropped down at a bit of a different angle and noticed a tall spire in the sky. Upon further investigation, I confirmed it to be a dying Douglas fir. This old man has had a good life though, I’d say. With an ample water supply and protection from the wind, he’s had a great home down in a seldom visited recess. The old man still stands at an impressive 169’, making him the tallest known Douglas fir in Colorado. After descending down to Hermosa Creek, I found another reminder of death in the valley. An impressive elk was laid out near the creek. Maybe a mountain lion had gotten him. As I went north along the creek, I became a little leery of walking under some of the shorter cliff faces and of what could be lurking above, and was reminded that even though I was letting people know my route for the day, I was still at the mercy of this wild place. An afternoon monsoon season thunderstorm threatened and I headed back out - this time truly saying goodbye to Hermosa.

Saturday, Aug 16th

This day brought a return to meeting new people and making new friends. I had met Aaron from Mountain Studies Institute at the conference and reached out to him after the conference to see if he or anyone else in the area would like to get out and measure some trees with lasers. Turns out, MSI was having a citizen science event on this day and Aaron invited me to demonstrate how to get various tree measurements with the Trupulse. They will be getting one of the grants from LTI. We carpooled over to the San Juan National Forest north of Pagosa Springs, and Aaron was kind enough to drive former intern Charlie and me over to the event. I’ve found the people of this area to be so friendly, another reason to spend more time out here in the future. Others from MSI and other locals joined us and we had a great day learning how to set up a transect. Part of their monitoring will be documenting a lot of data points both before and after thinning. But, this is no ordinary thinning. This is, what I believe Joe would say, is good forestry. A local entrepreneur has a contract to go in and take out a lot of the small stuff. He won’t touch a tree if it’s above a certain DBH. This should significantly reduce the risk of what a wildfire could do to the big trees and reduce the risk to the local watershed. Wood chips are being created with a plan to make electricity for the local community. This is primarily a ponderosa pine forest and this thinning would restore it to how it should look if it had never been fire suppressed – more of an open park-like appearance with high canopy ponderosa pines.

I used a nice ponderosa pine to get everyone some experience using the laser. Everyone took turns with the various equipment, and we measured height, height to live crown, average spread, and horizontal distance to the test tree. From there, we set up a 100 yard transect and documented a lot of things over that stretch including tree heights, height to live crown, DBH of trees to be taken and trees to be left, horizontal distances to the trees from the transect, how much dead wood was on the ground, what shrubs were present, how much vegetation was present for wildlife, etc. Everyone was in amazement at how much the laser sped up the process compared to the tangent method. They took to the laser right away and its superiority was made evident to all. I let others use the Trupulse 200 and wrote down the numbers they measured in the various quadrants. If I lived in the area, I could easily see myself doing some of these transects for them as part of their citizen science effort. Possibly the most beautiful forest type that I saw on the trip was old ponderosa pine forest with a lot of spacing in between, so it’s good to know that this is also the goal of some of the forest management that is taking place. I do hope to meet up with the MSI folks again, whether for more citizen science opportunities or for going out and showing them some of the impressive NTS finds.

Upon arriving back in Durango, I wasn’t quite ready to say goodbye to the serenity of the forest. I went up the Goulding Creek Trail and sat quietly above the beautiful Animas River Valley far below, enjoying one more moment in the unforgettable forests of the San Juans.


photos to follow

Matt Markworth

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dbhguru
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Re: A Trip to Durango, CO

Post by dbhguru » Mon Aug 18, 2014 8:54 pm

Matt,

We all are so in your debt for this wonderful trip report. Your superb contributions along with Larry's, Chris's, Mark's, and of course Will's are destined to play a part in raising the overall consciousness of people in the area. We'll soon start beating the drum.

Next year I hope we can organize a jeep trip up to Kennebec Pass where you can look down into the watershed you explored. I got a 137-foot Englemann at about 10,700 feet. I didn't scratch the surface. There's enough there for a dozen lifetimes. I'm sooo glad that I could share it with you all. Can't wait until next year.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Larry Tucei
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Re: A Trip to Durango, CO

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Aug 19, 2014 7:44 am

Matt- Excellent report of some of the most thrilling hiking and tree discoveries I have ever been involved with! I'll follow up on your post with another description of our adventure at Clear Creek with some photos. Larry

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Matt Markworth
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Re: A Trip to Durango, CO

Post by Matt Markworth » Tue Aug 26, 2014 8:00 am

All,

Here are some of my favorite photos from the trip:
Near the bottom of the drainage that passes Coal Bank Pass
Near the bottom of the drainage that passes Coal Bank Pass
Bonsai tree on Engineer Mountain
Bonsai tree on Engineer Mountain
Will, Rob, and Bob with big Engelmann Spruce
Will, Rob, and Bob with big Engelmann Spruce
The Larry Tucei Pine and me
The Larry Tucei Pine and me
Will, Me, Chris, Larry and Mark with Dutch Creek Giant
Will, Me, Chris, Larry and Mark with Dutch Creek Giant
Sandy Young
Sandy Young
Larry and the 152.5' Engelmann Spruce
Larry and the 152.5' Engelmann Spruce
Clear Creek
Clear Creek
Along the Million Dollar Highway
Along the Million Dollar Highway
Near Telluride
Near Telluride
Along the Million Dollar Highway
Along the Million Dollar Highway
Free Box in Telluride
Free Box in Telluride
The top of the Protect Hermosa Tree
The top of the Protect Hermosa Tree
The Protect Hermosa Tree and me
The Protect Hermosa Tree and me
Helping MSI with a transect - Charlie, Noah, Aaron, and Emily
Helping MSI with a transect - Charlie, Noah, Aaron, and Emily
The view of Colorado from The Four Corners
The view of Colorado from The Four Corners
Cliff 440' above Hermosa Creek
Cliff 440' above Hermosa Creek
Moon over Hermosa
Moon over Hermosa
Overlooking Hermosa
Overlooking Hermosa
Matt Markworth
Last edited by Matt Markworth on Tue Aug 26, 2014 2:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Larry Tucei
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Re: A Trip to Durango, CO

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Aug 26, 2014 10:57 am

Matt- Great photo's already thinking about next year. The Cliff shot is way cool, I'd sit right there hours. Larry

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Don
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Re: A Trip to Durango, CO

Post by Don » Tue Aug 26, 2014 4:55 pm

Larry-
Any problems adjusting to the increase in altitude, from S. Mississippi to the San Juans?
-Don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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Larry Tucei
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Re: A Trip to Durango, CO

Post by Larry Tucei » Wed Aug 27, 2014 7:59 am

Don- I handled the change quite well. Last year Bob took me to Engineer Mountain and he thought I did very well. I do lots of cardio Bike and eliptical. It has helped me in the past when I first went to Colorado back in 2000. On this trip I had to take easy only on the strenuous climbs up and down those gulches. You know how the air is thin at 10,000 and up. Larry

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Don
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Re: A Trip to Durango, CO

Post by Don » Wed Aug 27, 2014 11:59 pm

Well done Larry !
You remind me of how tough folks in the South can be, from my time in with the USFS in SE Kentucky...we did alright on western campaign fires, sometimes at similar altitudes (thinking now of Wind River country south out of Jackson Hole).
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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Matt Markworth
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Re: A Trip to Durango, CO

Post by Matt Markworth » Sat Nov 15, 2014 6:24 pm

All,

Here is an oil painting effect on one of my photos from the Million Dollar Highway. The drive from Engineer Mountain to Ouray is phenomenal. Just try to avoid people driving on the wrong side of the road:) (they're afraid of the cliff)
On the Way to Ouray.jpg
Matt

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Re: A Trip to Durango, CO

Post by dbhguru » Sat Nov 15, 2014 9:10 pm

Matt,

Thanks for sharing. Monica's and my time spent in southwestern Colorado has been pure magic. Can't get enough of that region of the country.

Next July, will produce another memorable experience, but our time will be spent in the field. I talked to Will this morning and he wants to get back out there. So much to see. So much to do.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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