Coast Redwood bigger than average

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mdvaden
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Coast Redwood bigger than average

Post by mdvaden » Thu Jun 05, 2014 3:19 pm

Found a particularly large Coast Redwood with Chris Atkins, the past few days. I won't be listing the dimensions or name. It appears to be the largest single Coast Redwood trunk known. More about it and other redwoods found are on the following link:

Read more at > http://www.mdvaden.com/redwood_year_discovery.shtml

One reason for omitting the trunk diameter in this post, is it will be tape wrapped again, possibly climbed and measured. We plan to explore more this summer, in several parks. Even repeating areas that have been explored. Its evident how possible it can be to pass by something this big first time through an area.

Updates will be added to that page, or possibly here in replies following.
Last edited by mdvaden on Wed Jul 15, 2015 9:45 am, edited 3 times in total.
M. D. Vaden of Oregon = http://www.mdvaden.com

200 Pages - Coast Redwoods - http://www.mdvaden.com/grove_of_titans.shtml

Portraits & Weddings - http://www.vadenphotography.com

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Coast Redwood bigger than average

Post by Larry Tucei » Thu Jun 05, 2014 3:31 pm

Mario- It amazes me that such a giant can still be found that has not been measured. Awesome! I know how exciting it is to find a large tree that has not been documented. Congrats to you and Chris. Look forward to the measurements. Larry
Last edited by Larry Tucei on Thu Sep 25, 2014 9:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

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John Harvey
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Re: Coast Redwood bigger than average

Post by John Harvey » Thu Jun 05, 2014 7:36 pm

I know I commented on the Facebook post but I'm very excited to see what you guys are finding out there. Its easy as your wandering the trails of the larger parks to think, "I wonder what's out there?" Just think of some of the more recently found giants and how they were "just off" the beaten path. There are obviously other hidden trees out there and its good to see you are finding them. I came across a huge tree in Jed Smith off path, just south of the titans that I had to pass on measuring as it was getting late. We already know that the Coast Redwood can exceed the Giant Sequoia in size, maybe the worlds largest tree is still undiscovered. Wouldn't that be something?
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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F.Jakobsson
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Re: Coast Redwood bigger than average

Post by F.Jakobsson » Fri Jun 06, 2014 12:21 am

Mario,
How very exciting - congratulations to both of you!
Feels like the whole of Sweden is shaking in anticipation, but it’s only me.
Hope it turns out to be one of the greatest…
/Fredrik

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Don
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Re: Coast Redwood bigger than average

Post by Don » Fri Jun 06, 2014 1:43 pm

Mario-
First, great find, massive base, and great photography...
But mostly, I think your comment about 'wrapping at tape', I completely agree. Such trees should be expertly measured once, by experts (note plural form, this is not a one person tree measuring job!).

One of the methods we recommend from the AF Measuring Guidelines is to use a reticled monocular and laser rangefinder to make pretty close estimates of diameter/girth. Instead of impacting the usually fragile vegetation tightly about the base, roaming further out where damage can be minimized is a low impact solution.

Hope my concern for these majestic wonders isn't bothersome for others...I have just seen too many marvels 'loved to death', even by the most careful visitors. An occupational hazard of National Park employees, I suspect: > }
-Don
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

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View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

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Mark Collins
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Re: Coast Redwood bigger than average

Post by Mark Collins » Fri Jun 06, 2014 2:37 pm

I would have to agree with everything that's been said so far about "wrapping a tape." It's a complicated dilemma because how is one to know if a tree has been wrapped before, and who is an expert? Some trees are more obvious than others, especially the more popular and photographed ones that get visited regularly. I don't think there are many of us who actually wrap a tape around a tree, but I could be wrong, and that could change over time.

Personally, I have the struggle of conscience every time I go out these days. Is wrapping a tape worth satisfying my own curiosity when it's clear that it can be a very destructive process, even trying to be as careful as possible? These days, I tend to do a wrap only if I think I can do it with little problem. Most of the big trees in Prairie Creek have so many life forms growing at the base of the trees that it doesn't seem worth wrapping a tape, even for curiosity's sake. Most of them are a two person job in my opinion, although I will admit, there are times I can't resist.

Definitely worth discussing and thinking about though...

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John Harvey
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Re: Coast Redwood bigger than average

Post by John Harvey » Fri Jun 06, 2014 5:55 pm

I think the question is this....Will wrapping a tape cause damage that will not "heal" or grow back over in a season? Obviously a tree like Stout Tree that has thousands of people walking around it on its roots will feel an impact. Even a tree in a place like the Grove of Titans would be a problem perhaps because of increased human presence. I personally did not tape wrap any trees in the Grove of the Titans, I have Michael Taylors site for that. That being said, if I see a tree in a remote part of a park, off trail, that has no traffic...I tape wrap it as long as I'm not doing significant damage or "permanent" damage. The one human every decade or so, that the vegetation around the base of some remote tree will encounter does not cause "significant" harm. Now if interest peaked and everyone started doing what we do, then there would be a problem with even this. The key I believe is to try and keep locations secret. An occasional trod through a majestic grove is a non issue in my opinion.
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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John Harvey
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Re: Coast Redwood bigger than average

Post by John Harvey » Fri Jun 06, 2014 6:10 pm

Ill add to this by saying that there are times that I believe the battle has been lost. I think that some time in the near future places like the GOT and other trees should probably receive some time of platform or boardwalk. Experts need to asses the damage and decide at some point. Will the tree die if this level of traffic continues? How have trees like Stout and Big Tree been impacted over the years? Are they dying? Do trails have to be "rerouted" to keep people from wandering by them?
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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sradivoy
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Re: Coast Redwood bigger than average

Post by sradivoy » Sat Jun 07, 2014 12:45 pm

JohnnyDJersey wrote:Ill add to this by saying that there are times that I believe the battle has been lost. I think that some time in the near future places like the GOT and other trees should probably receive some time of platform or boardwalk. Experts need to asses the damage and decide at some point. Will the tree die if this level of traffic continues? How have trees like Stout and Big Tree been impacted over the years? Are they dying? Do trails have to be "rerouted" to keep people from wandering by them?
I know wooden fences help reduce the foot traffic around various show trees like Sherman, Grant, Grizzly, Big Tree, etc. But even then many tourists hop the fence to get there photo taken next to the tree for scale. As a kind of natural "barbed wire" one can perhpas plant densly thicked thorney bushes around the tree's periphery for added protection.

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John Harvey
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Re: Coast Redwood bigger than average

Post by John Harvey » Sat Jun 07, 2014 8:17 pm

I know when I was in Big Basin there are these fences and signs telling you not to cross them. The whole time I was there I didn't see one person cross although I'm sure it still happens. In the northern parts of the redwood range there has been a lot of work to make things look natural and remove fences and signs and things of this nature. In Jed Smith there are literally none of these things and their actually used to be some time ago. The problem is many of the "secret" trees and groves are being found and the ground is seeing traffic that will only increase over time. I wish I had photos of the dirt pack around stout tree and others to show what I'm referring to but it looks really harmful and unnatural. What I would really like to see is a health report on these trees. Are the tops dying? What evidence do we have that it is shortening the life of the tree? I believe it is but I have never seen "evidence" or a report that shows this. If it is indeed true then at some point certain areas would have to give up the natural, more aesthetically pleasing look in favor of the platforms and fences if the trees are expected to survive.
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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