Borneo: Expedition Big Tree

Discussions of the great trees and forest of Southeast Asia and the East Indies

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

User avatar
edfrank
Posts: 4217
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 5:46 pm

Borneo: Expedition Big Tree

Post by edfrank » Fri Jun 04, 2010 9:34 am

Expedition Big Tree Borneo
Borneo.jpg
Borneo.jpg (27.47 KiB) Viewed 2604 times
The expedition calls attention to one of the remaining lowland forest in Sabah by finding and climbing its tallest tree. The hunt is on for Shorea and Kompassia species.Imbak valley was known to have the tallest tropical tree in the world.The team includes the world’s respected Canopy Scientists headed by Roman Dial and Tree Climbers Brett, Tom and James. The local Scientists from Sabah - Alex Korulus and Wildlife Photographer and Logistics Coordinator - Cede Prudente. Expedition was conducted in a series of visits from 2005 to 2008. The trip was Sponsored by National Geographic Expedition Council US.
Link here:
http://www.etawau.com/PlacesInterest/Ta ... _trees.htm

Location: Imbak Canyon and Tawau Hills Park

There is a photo gallery for those of you on Facebook. I don't know if it is open to non-Facebook users or non Friends 0f Friends.

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?ref=ho ... 0720843670

Roma Dial, a ENTS member, is part of the Expediton and in some of the photos.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

User avatar
James Parton
Posts: 1576
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2010 5:47 pm

Re: Borneo: Expedition Big Tree

Post by James Parton » Fri Jun 04, 2010 10:18 am

Ed,

I have read most, if not all of Roman Dial's posts on Borneo and Malasia. They are among the best in ENTS. I have not seen Roman post since spring 2007. I would wish him back. We also have a new member, Shorea, from Malasia. Hopefully he will get out and explore and post back to us.

The worlds Tropical Rainforests are such amazing places. But ENTS or it's concept would have to become global to really have a good whack at exploring these places and/or have high profile members ( like Roman and BVP ) who are willing to take time out of their busy schedules to post to the BBS data on these places. Another way, which may come to pass in the future would be for ENTS to have the ability to raise money and in this way to be able to send key members to sites they would not be able to go to on their own. Only time will tell. I am sure ENTS will grow.

Mentioning high-profile members, Has anyone ever asked Steve Sillett to join us? Both BVP and Will Blozan have worked with him. I am sure Steve knows of us and I am pretty sure Bob and Will would have brought us up.

Having high-profile members is a bonus for us. They have the means and backing to get to places the rest of us either cannot or rarely could. On the downside, they are very busy folks!

But just imagine an ENT deep in the Amazon Basin....

James
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

Jeroen Philippona
Posts: 117
Joined: Thu Mar 18, 2010 11:52 am

Re: Borneo: Expedition Big Tree

Post by Jeroen Philippona » Fri Jun 04, 2010 3:26 pm

Ed,

Its a bit confusing: is there a new Borneo Expedition or are you just pointing to the old information of 2005 - 2007?
Indeed it is a pity Roman Dial did not give new posts since that time. In his posts some years ago he said he could not give all information while National Geographic should not allow it, but there never was a complete report either in National Geographic.
As for the idea of sending ENTS members to tropical forests: there are a lot of professional researchers in many tropical forests. When they could be persued to do height measurements with sine-based laser / clinometer technology it should be cheaper to have reliable measurements from many parts of the world. Although of course it is nice for any ENT to visit the great rain forests themselves!

Jeroen

User avatar
edfrank
Posts: 4217
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 5:46 pm

Re: Borneo: Expedition Big Tree

Post by edfrank » Fri Jun 04, 2010 3:45 pm

Jeroen,

This is a note about an older expedition. I posted it because the Cede Prudente posted a series of photos from that previous trip in a Facebook Gallery Photos - Expedition Big Tree Borneo http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=1 ... 0720843670 These are photos that I have not seen before, nor do I believe were generally available before.

There are many qualified people doing excellent tree work in the tropics, and who are getting accurate height information. I believe James was wishing he and other friends here in ENTS were a part of the expeditions. I wish we could be more involved as a group with this work, and with the people and organizations doing this tropical research, perhaps as collaborators. At least I would like to kee p better informed of the work as it is progressing.

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

Jeroen Philippona
Posts: 117
Joined: Thu Mar 18, 2010 11:52 am

Re: Borneo: Expedition Big Tree

Post by Jeroen Philippona » Fri Jun 04, 2010 4:03 pm

Ed

Thanks, I made a Facebook acount now and saw the beautiful photos. I did not see them before either. Like James I should like to go to these incredible forests!

Jeroen

User avatar
edfrank
Posts: 4217
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 5:46 pm

Re: Borneo: Expedition Big Tree

Post by edfrank » Fri Jun 04, 2010 4:06 pm

Jeroen,

The note says they were posted 11 hours ago. Here is a 1 minute promo for a program about an expedition to Borneo ( a different one) that aired sometime last fall on the Science Channel here in the US. I didn't see the program, but thought I would post the link to the promo video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCSYGF3kvaA&feature=player_embedded


Cede Prudente is a professional photographer from Malaysia. Here is his website/blog: http://cedeprudente.blogspot.com/

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

User avatar
James Parton
Posts: 1576
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2010 5:47 pm

Re: Borneo: Expedition Big Tree

Post by James Parton » Fri Jun 04, 2010 11:50 pm

Ed,

It would not even have to be me. It would just be so neat to see what ENTS could do in the tropics.

James
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

Shorea
Posts: 70
Joined: Sat May 22, 2010 4:30 am

Re: Borneo: Expedition Big Tree

Post by Shorea » Sat Jun 05, 2010 2:28 am

Neat! I would like to add that no recent records exist for tall big trees in Peninsular Malaysia at present. Perhaps one day we can get some expeditions to locate some tall records for Peninsular Malaysia? I believe the tallest was a tualang (Koompassia excelsa) at 81 m, measured in the 70s (Foxworthy).

I'd like to see some 70-80 m records from Taman Negara and Krau Game Reserve - Cos there are some very big Koompassia excelsa trees there. In fact, Taman Negara at 434,000 hectares of primary dipterocarp forest (one of the best protected and largest in South East Asia) may well contain some impressive trees, although the many times I've been there, I've not encountered anything more than 50 meters tall. But then again, that's based on my very fallible human measurements :)

In contrast, almost all the forests in Sabah and in much of Borneo has been felled. Even the best hope of preserving these giant trees (until recently) - The 1500 square mile Sembakung area just south of Tawau Hills Park in the Kalimantan side of Borneo which was proposed as a National Park in Indonesia, has been logged to bits. Logging roads now crisscross the forest, viewable from Google Maps... :(

It's very tragic....And you can bet almost no one in Malaysia and Indonesia knows or cares of these tallest tropical trees, which is right there in their backyard, so to speak.

Shorea
Posts: 70
Joined: Sat May 22, 2010 4:30 am

Re: Borneo: Expedition Big Tree

Post by Shorea » Sat Jun 05, 2010 10:38 am

Thought of posting this as well. This site seems related to Brett Mifsud, I think, one of the members of the expedition. There are more GREAT pictures here from the Big Tree Expedition several years ago on this page.

http://www.landmarktrees.net/borneo.html

Overall, I think it's an awesome site with superb photos of giant trees, mainly in America, Australia and Sabah, Borneo. Check out the latest news page too.

http://www.landmarktrees.net/latest.html

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4529
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Borneo: Expedition Big Tree

Post by dbhguru » Sun Jun 06, 2010 7:33 am

Shorea,

You're comment about no one caring about the tall trees is more the rule than the exception, wherever you go. Bringing exceptional trees up on people's radar scopes is a lifelong mission. It has even proven difficult here in the land of Thoreau. However, progress is being made. It has been slow, but I think a point is eventually reached where public consciousness rapidly expands. Late August, I'll be making a presentation to the Laurel Hill Association in Stockbridge, MA. Wikipedia defines the Association as follows:

"The Laurel Hill Association is the nation's oldest village beautification society. Founded in 1853 in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, it has played a key role in the beautification of the Berkshire County town."

Laurel Hill Association owns Ice Glen, which claims the second highest Rucker Index in Massachusetts - quite a feat for a an area of around 30 acres.

Your task is far, far more challenging, but with at least a few of you carrying the word, people may begin to look at what they have around them with different eyes. I wish there was more we could do to support you.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

Post Reply

Return to “Southeast Asia & East Indies”