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Menara's height from averaged ground level is 97.58 m

Posted: Fri Jun 21, 2019 10:43 am
by M.W.Taylor
Correction from after reading Kouta's comments. (distance to lowest part of the buttress; distance to lowest part of bole is 98.90 m, distance to highest base point of bole 96.26 m)

Centurion is now over 100m. It recently lost a lot of its crown and the top leader is no longer sagging under all that weight. It stands almost straight up now. Will report on this soon with a few pictures of the changes and another independent laser measurement that confirms height at ~ 100.5m.

Re: Minera's height from averaged ground level is 98.53m

Posted: Fri Jun 21, 2019 6:13 pm
by MarkGraham
Thanks for this update. It’s interesting how the next three tallest species after coast redwood (yellow meranti, eucalyptus regnens, and Douglas fir) are height limited to right at 100 meters or so, at least among current trees.

Re: Minera's height from averaged ground level is 98.53m

Posted: Sat Jun 22, 2019 2:31 am
by KoutaR
The report is here:
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10 ... 00032/full
it has a height of 100.8 m (distance to lowest part of the buttress; distance to lowest part of bole is 98.90 m, distance to highest base point of bole 96.26 m)
I would say its height is 97.58 m, average between the lowest part of bole and the highest part of bole. I would not count buttresses. In sloping temperate forests, too, aboveground roots could make trees 2 m taller.

BTW, the name of the tree is Menara, not Minera.

Kouta

Re: Minera's height from averaged ground level is 98.53m

Posted: Sat Jun 22, 2019 2:54 am
by KoutaR
Another thing: I am wondering if these tallest tropical trees are all properly identified. Years ago, Roman Dial's group found that many species are capable to attain about the same heights. Now all the new records are dubbed as S. faguetiana. "Yellow meranti" is not a species but a group of 32 Shorea species, many of which are huge trees. One possibility could be that some trees have been identified as yellow meranti (species group) but the species may not always be S. faguetiana. In popular media, Yellow meranti has unfortunately become a synonym to S. faguetiana because the world needs an English name. Malay name for S. faguetiana is damar siput (in Peninsular Malaysia) or seraya kuning siput (in Sabah), apparently too difficult for English publications.

In his massive book "On the Forests of Tropical Asia: Lest the memory fade" (2014), Peter Ashton, one of the most renowed dipterocarp experts, says the 88.32 m tree measured by Roman Dial is Shorea gibbosa (p. 112)!

Kouta