Tree of the Week Guidelines

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Matt Markworth
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Tree of the Week Guidelines

Post by Matt Markworth » Sun Mar 31, 2013 9:08 pm

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Hi All,

First just want to say that I'm blown away by the lists that have been created by NTS Members. For example, reading Jess's Maxlist is absolutely mind-boggling and I stand in awe of the measuring feats accomplished by Members past and present.

When reading about trees that have been measured and when measuring in the field, I often struggle with knowing what to compare it to without having to look it up. Combine that with the fact that I only truly learn by doing, I'd like to keep track of maximums here. I'll dig around and find what I can, but of course much of the information is scattered in posts and spreadsheets and I would appreciate input from all the measurers out there.

The goal is to document maximums (height, girth, spread, volume) of tree species.

Guidelines

1) Must have either personally measured the tree per the standards of the document "Tree Measuring Guidelines of the Eastern Native Tree Society" or have knowledge of the person that has accurately measured the tree. http://www.nativetreesociety.org/measur ... vised1.pdf

2) If you have knowledge that another person discovered the tree and accurately measured it in the past, please mention that person in the notes. If it’s a planted tree and/or growing outside of its natural range, then include this in the notes. For private land, please list the Property Owner as Private Owner with a Site Name showing the city or county.

3) If you think you've measured a specimen displaying the growth potential of the species, please reply to the NTS BBS thread for that particular species or genus using the following format. Existing threads can be found in this forum: http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewforum.php?f=393 Please start a new topic in the forum if the species or genus you're looking for isn't listed.


Species (Scientific):
Species (Common):
Form (Forest, Open, or Intermediate):
Height:
CBH:
Maximum Spread:
Average Spread:
Volume:
Site:
Subsite:
Country:
State or Province:
Property Owner:
Date of Measurement:
Measurer(s):
Method of Height Measurement:
Tree Name:
Habitat:
Notes:

- Matt Markworth
Last edited by Matt Markworth on Sun Oct 05, 2014 10:49 am, edited 175 times in total.

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edfrank
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Re: Tree of the Week Spreadsheet and Guidelines

Post by edfrank » Sat May 04, 2013 3:12 pm

Matt,

Thank you for starting this project. At some point we as a group need to publish our own big tree list that shows the largest confirmed specimens of each species in out database. We have fewer members, and likely fewer trees submitted than do big tree lists like American Forests, but at least out numbers are right.

Are you familiar with the list compiled in 2004 by Colby Rucker and others in the earlier days of ENTS? http://www.nativetreesociety.org/bigtre ... e_list.htm One aspect of this list I particularly liked was the attempt to include a broader listing of buig trees for each of the cited species. It included measurements of trees farther down the list and trees that represented the tallest in particular regions. it included accurate measurements of trees that had died, or the height of some trees prior to their tops being lost as well as current trees and heights.

I think we should be pursuing both approaches - 1) generate a listing of the biggest, as the last compilation by Jess Riddle and the updates you are including here, and 2) we need to create a list with greater depth of specimens. Much of this can be accomplished if people would compile their existing data into a spreadsheet format that could be imported into the Trees Database. On the database end, Mitch is needing chunks of data to figure out how to best implement the spreadsheet import functions, and people with the data are waiting under the import function is up and running to submit their data.

Edward Frank
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Tree of the Week Spreadsheet and Guidelines

Post by Matt Markworth » Sat May 04, 2013 9:41 pm

Ed,

Thanks for the link. I think I stumbled upon it once, but now I have it saved as a favorite and will use it as a resource to research tree maximums, similar to how I've been using Jess's MaxList. It must have been a herculean effort for all involved to create the list, not to mention the thousands of hours of measuring to be able to create such a list.

As new trees eventually replace existing trees on the Tree of the Week Maximums List, I'm going to set up a separate tab for past record holders. That way all the information will stay in one spreadsheet and the information on the replaced trees won't be lost.

I agree that having a greater depth of specimens is a must and it sounds like the Trees Database will be the most efficient way of getting that accomplished.

- Matt

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Tree of the Week Spreadsheet and Guidelines

Post by Matt Markworth » Sun May 19, 2013 7:43 pm

Hi All,

I'm copying over a couple of my posts from the Abies thread, as they pertain to the list in general . . .
Just want to say thank you to everyone for all the participation and support thus far in the effort to create an up-to-date Maximums List via the idea of "Tree of the Week." I have leaned heavily on Jess Riddle's MaxList and other lists and I appreciate all of the submissions that have occurred in the first month and a half of the Tree of the Week forum.

Realizing that it could take over a decade to make a complete list at the rate of one species per week, it makes sense to cover more ground so that a complete list can be within reach. Ed Frank suggested doing a genus or two per week, which I think is a great idea and we can work through the genera alphabetically.

Here are my thoughts on the future direction of the list:

- Since the goal for the list is to document tree maximums, the geographical reach of the list will only be limited by the geographical reach of NTS.

- Whether a tree is inside or outside its natural range, if it represents a maximum for the species, then it will be included on the list. If a tree outside its natural range represents a maximum for the species, then the maximum from inside the natural range can also be included.

- If it’s a planted tree and/or growing outside of its natural range, then this must be in the notes. I will create a separate column for this information if there are sufficient trees that fit one or both of these categories.

- If NTS has measured a particular species, but it’s clear that the measurement is well below the growth potential for the species, then it won’t be entered on the list. In other words, if our geographical reach keeps us from measuring an exceptional specimen, then there is no point in including a lesser specimen outside of its natural range.
- Matt

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dbhguru
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Re: Tree of the Week Spreadsheet and Guidelines

Post by dbhguru » Mon Aug 19, 2013 8:19 pm

Matt,

For the entry for Pinus strobiformis (southwestern white pine) please change the height to 127.0 feet, the girth to 6.3 feet, and the date of measurement to July 2013. Other entries stay the same.

More changes coming.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Matt Markworth
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Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2012 8:41 pm

Re: Tree of the Week Spreadsheet and Guidelines

Post by Matt Markworth » Tue Aug 20, 2013 8:58 pm

Bob,

Nice to see that height number being raised again. It's exciting to witness Colorado's potential coming more and more into focus.

I updated the list and moved the Veronica Egan Tree over to the "Other Superlative Trees" tab.

- Matt

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