Paleotornadoes

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samson'sseed
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Paleotornadoes

Post by samson'sseed » Sat Feb 18, 2017 9:09 am

I invented a new term--paleotornadoes--in case a scientist figures out how to study tornadoes that occurred before recorded history.

I hypothesize that tornado frequency and intensity was more severe during some climatic stages of the Pleistocene, and I think there was an Ice Age tornado alley in the middle south because this region was a transition zone between the Laurentide Ice Sheet and the warmer than present day temperatures of the Gulf of Mexico.

https://markgelbart.wordpress.com/2017/ ... w-ecology/

There was an episode of What on Earth? on the Science Channel that showed a satellite photo of a long cleared path in a Wisconsin forest. It looked manmade because it was so straight. People went to investigate and determined it was made by a tornado. They traced it back to a tornado that hit the area in 2008.

Windthrows are fascinating.

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Don
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Re: Paleotornadoes

Post by Don » Sat Feb 18, 2017 2:43 pm

I'm reminded of a wind event near us in SE Kentucky in the late 1980's. It was determined to be a micro-burst. Localized and affecting singularly but one tree, a northern red oak, the tree was thoroughly dissembled with some of it's parts reduced to toothpick-sized particles. The power of that wind event held us in awe...as a species, growing in SE Kentucky, they were a gnarly tough wood.
Don
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Lucas
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Re: Paleotornadoes

Post by Lucas » Mon Feb 20, 2017 12:37 pm

paleotornadoes

Plausible but proving it is the trick.

Given some of the amazing techniques with isotopes etc it may be doable at some point.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Rand
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Re: Paleotornadoes

Post by Rand » Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:32 am

When looking at the dust content of ice cores scientist have inferred that it was much, much stormier during the ice age, than now. Whether that including tornadic storms, or just large, strong cyclonic systems (like a nor'easter for example) I have no idea.

wisconsitom
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Re: Paleotornadoes

Post by wisconsitom » Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:39 am

That Wisconsin tornado happened quite near my land. It was a doozey, in terms of forest-clearing power.

samson'sseed
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Re: Paleotornadoes

Post by samson'sseed » Sat Feb 25, 2017 9:02 am

Rand wrote:When looking at the dust content of ice cores scientist have inferred that it was much, much stormier during the ice age, than now. Whether that including tornadic storms, or just large, strong cyclonic systems (like a nor'easter for example) I have no idea.
I think the dust content in ice cores is interpreted as originating from drier climate with more exposed soil.

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Paleotornadoes

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Mon Feb 27, 2017 11:32 pm

A Memorial Day 1985 tornado leveled about 800 acres of old-growth hemlock-beech in the Tionesta Scenic Area in the Allegheny National Forest. Wouldn't you know it? It just had to target one of the best last old-growth remnants in the east! But that's the luck of the draw.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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