An Unidentified Broadleaf

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ElijahW
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Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:04 pm

An Unidentified Broadleaf

Post by ElijahW » Mon Jul 16, 2018 5:18 pm

NTS,

I’m again seeking help in identifying a broadleaf tree growing in Durand Eastman Park. Tom Howard and I came across several of these trees on our last visit. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. In addition to the photos below, a couple of clues may be helpful:

1. When crushed, the leaves emit a strong citrus odor.
2. The leaves appear to whorled in arrangement.
3. Buds are very pubescent.
4. No easily identifiable fruit is present.
Bark
Bark
Leaf arrangement
Leaf arrangement
Bud
Bud
Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: An Unidentified Broadleaf

Post by Erik Danielsen » Mon Jul 16, 2018 5:38 pm

The important clue corroborated by the other details you note is that the leaf scars encircle the twigs, at least from what I can see of the photos. Together with the other characteristics (leaves entire, alternate, aromatic) confirm that it belongs in Magnoliaceae, unless it's an exotic horticultural that isn't included in any references I have. The arrangement of leaves in whorl-like clusters only fits Magnolia tripetala out of the species native in the northeast. Perhaps the hairy "bud" is the seedpod developing? Another nonnative Magnolia could also be possible. I have run into "feral" M. tripetala populations in intact forests around old estates in the hudson valley.

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ElijahW
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Re: An Unidentified Broadleaf

Post by ElijahW » Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:09 pm

Erik,

I was assuming it was a magnolia, but the dimensions of the leaves don’t fit any magnolias I’m aware of. Umbrella would be a possible exception, though a couple of these trees exceed 80’ in height. I think that would rule out tripetala. I think it may be Asian. If I can catch it in flower, I’ll post those pictures. Thanks,

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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ElijahW
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Re: An Unidentified Broadleaf

Post by ElijahW » Tue Jul 09, 2019 12:42 pm

Erik, NTS,

I’m fairly certain now that this tree is Kobus Magnolia, or Magnolia kobus var. borealis. Since making my initial post, I’ve cross-checked the tree with known examples and done a lot of research online. Interestingly, this species is reproducing in Durand Eastman Park, to the point that it might be considered invasive. It is attractive, though.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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