pictures of some trees at my timberland

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gnmcmartin
Posts: 464
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 7:16 pm

Re: pictures of some trees at my timberland

Post by gnmcmartin » Fri Jun 28, 2019 10:36 am

Joshua:

There are two answers I can give, a short one, and then a long one--I mean very, very long.

First, the short one. It is difficult for me to give any written instructions here for selecting trees for removal to enhance the growth and beauty of your timberland. One really needs to be "on the ground" with someone like me, or any good professional forester. NY State has a program to provide forestry assistance to timberland owners. You can learn about these services at: https://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/5238.html When I bought my timberland, that was the first thing I did. MD has very large tax reductions available for timberland owners who follow a strict management plan. NY may not have this. I have been in the MD program for 44 years. I have not tried to get specific information about the benefits available in NY, but they do have a "stewardship" program, and what this will provide for you is advice and help, on the ground, from one of their professional foresters. Almost all of these ae very good, very interested in helping landowners understand how best to manage their timberland, and discussing the various pros and cons of cutting this or that tree, etc.

If you contact them, and get a forester to come to your timberland to help you, I would like to hear how it goes.

Now, as for the long, long answer. I am a forest and forestry "freak," and have been more intensely involved in managing my timberland than I could explain in 200 pages. I do things that, as far as I know, no one else has done. But how much of this that I could share with you that could possibly be of any use to you, I simply have no idea.

But I would be extremely eager to share with you any and all information I can. If you came to visit my timberland--to see what it is really like, in person, and to discuss all I have done, I would enjoy that.

But, first, it would help me to know just a little more about you and your timberland. So, some questions:

1. How many acres?

2. Approximately what age are the trees? How large? Are they straight and tall?

3. What species? In what kind(s) of mixture(s)

4. What is the quality of your soil(s) for tree growth? If you don't know, you can get a county soil survey, which includes information for tree growth. These are available on-line, but maybe your local ASCS office could give you a printed copy.

5. How old are you, meaning for how many years do you expect to be working to improve and enjoy your timberland?

6. Are you an experienced chainsaw user? Have you felled any trees yourself? Do you anticipate doing a lot of the work yourself?

Well, I might have more questions if you want to get into all this in any depth. Once I have some idea about what you have, I might be able to discuss more about your options. Of course, the forester that the local DEC office will assign to you can discuss these with you also.

But, briefly, an attempt to develop truly old-growth characteristics, or uneven age stand characteristics in an even aged stand can be difficult. I can discuss this with you at length, having considered doing something like that myself, and deciding that in my case it was not a good idea. I could turn you onto some excellent research on uneven age forest management, but I will hold that for now. I don't want you to suffer from "overload" at this point.

Another resource that I made extensive use of is the forestry department at SUNY. They have, or had, many years ago when I had numerous conversations with various research scientists there, beautiful, beautiful people. Leading them back then was a gem of all gems, the Dean of Research, Edwin White--now retired. Charles Maynard gave me a personal tour of the experimental forest and all the research facilities there. He was one of the research scientists that did a gene transfer into American Chestnut for blight immunity. That was quite an achievement.

Well, I have talked personally to a number of other forest scientists in different parts of the country. I describe this to let you know that if you have the time and the interest, there is so much "out there" to keep you endlessly fascinated. I had one special advantage having studied forestry for a time at Michigan State University, and I was a member of the Society of American Foresters for about 40 years--another source of information.

Oh, I should also mention that I made heavy use of the forest research scientists at the forest research station in Parson's, WV. Again, amazingly helpful people. Many, many years ago I was given a full one-day personal tour of the research forest there by H. Clay Smith. Talk about a beautiful person!

Well, as for how, physically, to remove trees, and the problems with commercial timber cutters, I could talk for hours about that. Maybe later I could help you avoid some serious problems. Maybe your newly assigned forester with DEC could take you around and show you some logging sites. My forester here did that with me, but I also did a lot on my own.

Well, I am sure this is enough for now.

--Gaines

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JHarkness
Posts: 249
Joined: Sun May 13, 2018 5:44 pm

Re: pictures of some trees at my timberland

Post by JHarkness » Sat Jun 29, 2019 8:36 am

Gaines,

I have sent you a private message with my e-mail address. Feel free to e-mail me. I thought this was better as I am anticipating a series of long replies on part of both of us.

Joshua
"Be not simply good; be good for something." Henry David Thoreau

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gnmcmartin
Posts: 464
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 7:16 pm

Re: pictures of some trees at my timberland

Post by gnmcmartin » Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:58 am

Joshua:

Yes, I got the message, and I may be able to help by sharing some of my experience. We may "converge" in some specific areas. I will get to you soon.

--Gaines

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