This sounds bad.

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Lucas
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Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2014 11:55 am

This sounds bad.

Post by Lucas » Wed Oct 03, 2018 6:47 pm

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features ... y-invasion

Lanternfly Invasion "Penn State said the fly “could be the most destructive species in 150 years.”"

"Penn State said the fly “could be the most destructive species in 150 years.”

The state hasn’t come up with industry-specific estimates, but the hardwood and fruit-growing industries are especially threatened. “This is our No. 1 concern,” says Sarah Hall-Bagdonas of the Northern Tier Hardwood Association, "

on the upside

"Adult lanternflies prefer to feed on ailanthus altissima, aka the tree of heaven, itself an invasive species that originated in China"
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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JHarkness
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Re: This sounds bad.

Post by JHarkness » Wed Oct 03, 2018 7:36 pm

I'm not sure how bad this would really be to native trees, my understanding, granted I haven't thoroughly read about the lanternfly yet, is that it mainly attacks fruit trees and tree-of-heaven, one could easily assume that an impending threat on fruit trees would be exaggerated because most people care more about fruit trees than they do native forest trees. I haven't seen any evidence so far of it attacking a native hardwood, if anyone know of such an event I'd be very interested to know. Hopefully this doesn't become yet another forest pest...
"Be not simply good; be good for something." Henry David Thoreau

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Rand
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Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 9:25 pm

Re: This sounds bad.

Post by Rand » Thu Oct 04, 2018 10:10 am

JHarkness wrote:I'm not sure how bad this would really be to native trees, my understanding, granted I haven't thoroughly read about the lanternfly yet, is that it mainly attacks fruit trees and tree-of-heaven, one could easily assume that an impending threat on fruit trees would be exaggerated because most people care more about fruit trees than they do native forest trees. I haven't seen any evidence so far of it attacking a native hardwood, if anyone know of such an event I'd be very interested to know. Hopefully this doesn't become yet another forest pest...
I'm still worried that if there get to be enough of them, they will start attacking anything and everything. You hear stories of locus swarms literally eating everything green.

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: This sounds bad.

Post by Erik Danielsen » Thu Oct 04, 2018 12:09 pm

Recorded hosts for the Nymphs include maples, cherry, pine, willow, and poplar species. Secondary effects like interactions with existing fungal pathogens are possible, since the feeding nymphs leave deposits of sugary "honeydew" on bark.

Not apocalyptic, but certainly not helpful especially as part of the broader complex of interacting invasions. Fortunately many citizen observations of these insects so far are of them suffering predation from native spiders, wasps etc so at least this one isn't getting a free lunch like HWA or Phragmites and other predator-free invaders.

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