Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by Matt Markworth » Sun Jun 30, 2013 4:52 pm

Ash on a hillside in Northern Kentucky . . .
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- Matt

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Ranger Dan
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by Ranger Dan » Mon Jul 01, 2013 4:15 pm

For posterity, we should document the ash trees, as we wish could have been done for the American chestnut. Take lots of pictures, movies, measurements, notes on aspects of the site conditions and biological communities they live in. Take detailed pictures of the ones with unique and special character, especially.

Last fall I made a return trip to Prettyland Mountain, in the Smokies, because I recalled a lot of stately, tall ash trees there in never-logged forest. I have images and movie-ettes to share. some of the trees are quite tall. No exceptional trunk diameters, but many in the 30-40" diameter range, and very beautiful, open forest, in company with yellow buckeye, other northern hardwoods, and spruce. It's very tough to ge to. I can give directions and descriptions to anyone interested.

At the Claytor Nature Study Center near Bedford, VA, where I work, we have an exceptional white ash. It was measured by our big tree coordinator and author of Remarkable Trees of Virginia, who says it may be Virginia's 5th largest. We would like to be able to save it, but since the trunk diameter is 5 ft., I understand that may not be practical or even possible. We will be heartbroken to see it go, along with the other stately ash trees that are so common here.

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Will Blozan
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by Will Blozan » Mon Jul 01, 2013 5:47 pm

Dan,

The removal costs of that 5' diameter ash would surely equate to several- if not many years of EAB treatments. Money has to be spent one way or another- that is unavoidable. If imidacloprid can be used it is super cheap. Dinotefuran is the second least costly and emamectin the most costly. Choose wisely.

Will

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Tue Jul 02, 2013 6:53 am

Photos of a hillside in Kentucky??!! You mean there are some that haven't been leveled for the coal beneath them?

Joe

Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by Joe » Tue Jul 02, 2013 9:06 am

Speaking of WV, the attached photo was just sent to me by Peter Church, current Forest Stewardship Director for Mass- it's a "patch reserve".
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Ranger Dan
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by Ranger Dan » Sat Jul 06, 2013 8:54 am

Regarding treatment for emerald ash borer, accounts of failure of treatments have led me to believe that it may be a waste of time and resources to attempt treating a 5-ft. diameter white ash, or even a modest sized one, for that matter. But I'm not giving up that easily. Can anyone give a recommendation on exactly how much imidacloprid (preferably) or other insecticide it would take to treat a white ash with a 16 ft. circumference? Some research I've read online suggests using twice the recommended rate of imidacloprid (Xytect in this case) on "larger" trees in the 15-22" range. Is injection with Emamectin Benzoate necessary?

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