Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

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russ richardson
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Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by russ richardson » Thu Sep 20, 2012 9:06 pm

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SAY GOOD BYE TO THE WHITE ASH TREE - Death Knell By Ash Borer
(09/21/2012)
Russ Richardson

http://www.hurherald.com/cgi-bin/db_scr ... d&id=49623


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This summer, throughout much of southern Calhoun and Roane Counties this has become a very common sight as many residents discuss the “early fall” we seem to be having.

What has actually been happening is that we are witnessing the likely extinction of an entire species of ecologically important and economically valuable tree - white ash, as the introduced insect pest, the emerald ash borer spreads across the region killing virtually every ash tree in sight.

continued...

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Rand
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by Rand » Fri Sep 21, 2012 10:51 am

It's been a sad two summers here in the north central part of ohio as the mass die off commences. It'd say maybe 1/3 of the ash trees have died so far. My parents started treating their ash trees several years ago, they are small and still dying. Very sad.

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AndrewJoslin
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by AndrewJoslin » Fri Sep 21, 2012 9:13 pm

It's now in western Connecticut and western Massachusetts. It's moving much faster than it could on its own, firewood transport is causing accelerated movement of EAB into the northeast U.S. Heartbreaking.
-AJ

Joe

Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by Joe » Sat Sep 22, 2012 6:24 am

AndrewJoslin wrote:It's now in western Connecticut and western Massachusetts. It's moving much faster than it could on its own, firewood transport is causing accelerated movement of EAB into the northeast U.S. Heartbreaking.
-AJ
The state of Mass. will probably establish a quarantine- but being a burreacracy, it's going to take time, probably too long.

I recently marked 2 timber sales which include a lot of ash- the loggers are worried that they won't be able to move those logs.
Joe

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AndrewJoslin
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by AndrewJoslin » Sat Sep 22, 2012 1:48 pm

Joe wrote:The state of Mass. will probably establish a quarantine- but being a burreacracy, it's going to take time, probably too long.

I recently marked 2 timber sales which include a lot of ash- the loggers are worried that they won't be able to move those logs.
Joe
No matter what the state does, they won't be able to stop it, it will be a matter of slowing it down at best. Not being pessimistic, just realistic.
-AJ

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by Matt Markworth » Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:36 pm

Here was the view from the trail at Caldwell Park (Ohio) this morning. Walking the trails, I looked skyward and saw the telltale branch pattern of the White Ash throughout the forest.

This 122-acre park, the property of the Cincinnati Parks Board, is an old-growth beech-maple segregate of the mixed mesophytic forest, according to Old Growth in the East: A Survey.
White Ash  Caldwell Park.jpg
White Ash  Caldwell Park 2.jpg
- Matt

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Sun Jan 13, 2013 9:40 pm

We've wrecked Mother Earth. Nothing is going to get better until we're gone. Sorry to say it, but it's true.

Joe

Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by Joe » Mon Jan 14, 2013 7:49 am

Why did they leave those high stumps? They just left the logs on the ground?

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by Matt Markworth » Mon Jan 14, 2013 8:37 pm

Joe -

I'm not sure what their plan is. I saw the same thing in California Woods, another Cincinnati park with old growth. I haven't seen anyone in the park to ask and emails have gone unanswered, but I'll keep digging. I suppose that if their goal is to minimize the highly unlikely possibility of a tree falling on a hiker, then this does the trick.

In various articles that I've read, it doesn't appear that any priority was given to these parks for treatment.

- Matt

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Say Good Bye to the White Ash Tree (WV)

Post by Matt Markworth » Tue Jan 15, 2013 9:13 pm

I received a reply from someone knowledgeable at the Cincinnati Park Board, in regards to my question about existing treatment plans. I've included the reply and my reply back to him . . .
Matt,

EAB has been present in California Woods for 4 - 5 years and has already killed most of the trees. Those that remain are more than 40% infested and are not good candidates for treatment.

Generally, trees larger than 30" diameter are not recommended for treatment anyway because it requires an enormous amount of chemical to reach all of the tree and the success rate is sporadic.

The Park Board is not funded to treat our 5,000 acres of ash trees. We received a 5 year grant that funds the treatment of about 100 trees in 3 parks (Ault, Mt Echo, and Mt Airy), the vast majority of park ash trees will be removed as they become hazardous.

I wish I had a better answer for you. Unfortunately EAB has caused similar destruction everywhere it is found.
Thanks so much for the information, it's greatly appreciated.

While walking the trails, I may use the sine method with my laser rangefinder and clinometer to accurately measure some of their heights. I'm able to do that without a tape or having contact with the tree. For historical purposes, it may be nice to record some of the maximum heights in this area. In fact, if you ever need any help accurately measuring tree heights for any important trees in the parks, please let me know, it's something I enjoy doing.
- Matt

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