Robert Ridgway article from 1882

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edfrank
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Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by edfrank » Fri Apr 22, 2011 5:13 pm

ScreenHunter_05 Apr. 22 18.10.jpg
Ridgway, Robert. 1882. Notes on the Native Trees of the Lower Wabash and White River Valleys, in Illinois and Indiana, Proceedings of United States National Museum, Volume 5, June 12, 1882, p. 49-88.
Ridgeway_USNMP-5_264_1882.pdf
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Robert Ridgway (July 2, 1850 – March 25, 1929) was an American ornithologist. Ridgway was a protégé of zoologist Spencer Fullerton Baird, who, on becoming the secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, appointed Ridgway the first full-time curator of birds at the United States National Museum. He served from 1880 until his death in 1929. Ridgway also published one of the first and most important color system for bird identification, with his 1886 book A Nomenclature of Colors for Naturalists. In 1912 he self-published a larger work on color nomenclature, Color Standards and Color Nomenclature, financed using money from his friend and colleague José Castulo Zeledón of Costa Rica. Ornithologists all over the world continue to cite Ridgway's color studies and books. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Ridgway

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"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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edfrank
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Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by edfrank » Mon Apr 29, 2013 10:29 am

This photo appeared on Facebook today. I am unsure of the source.
From Roger Beadles:

This is a copy of a historic picture taken in 1882 with Robert Ridgeway the ornithologist is on the left and his brother on right.The Sycamore at breast height tree is 15' 6" and height is 168 ft and crown spread is 134 ft.This tree was located along the Big Wabash River south of Mt carmel abouit 5 miles.It was cut down in 1897 by landowner because of to much foot traffic across his field.There was also another giant sycamore across the river 2 miles north that equaled in size but it was also gone by the 1900's.From the Little Cypress Swamp to Beull woods area there were several trees measuring over 6 ft in diameter,now the cypress tree I had a picture by is probably the largest tree left.
ridgeway.jpg
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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edfrank
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Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by edfrank » Mon Apr 29, 2013 10:45 am

Update:

Roger Beadles replies: Back in the 1960's it was a poster size picture at Beull Woods nature preserve and they had post card size copies for the taking to compare what was there at that time.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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dbhguru
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Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by dbhguru » Mon Apr 29, 2013 2:03 pm

Ed,

Having visited Beall Woods three times, I have to say that I'd never have predicted trees of such size as once grew in that region, had I mot seen these old photographs. They were what motivated me to visit the area initially, plus glowing descriptions from well-intentioned people who imagined that what they were seeing was far more impressive than in actuality.

We have accustomed ourselves to a landscape with small trees as the norm. Monica and I went to southern Connecticut on Sunday and returned today. Totally uninspiring. I have no idea of what once grew across the Connecticut countryside, but what grows there today leaves one in a state of want. Yes, there are exceptional spots, but they are few and far between. Come to think of it, this description equally applies to the rest of the Northeast.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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edfrank
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Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by edfrank » Mon Apr 29, 2013 2:22 pm

Bob,

Do your magic diameter estimation/measurement on the sycamore. Eli and I think they are including the side trunk to get the 15 foot diameter.

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Will Blozan
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Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Will Blozan » Mon Apr 29, 2013 4:19 pm

Ed,

They obviously wrapped the minion trunk as well. And botched the height. The farmer could have killed the trespassers not the tree.

Bob,

If wraps were done on multiple stems this is why we see what we see now. Just regular-old nice floodplain forest with a scattering of bigger trees. 6 foot sycamores are not real hard to find even now.

Will

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Rand
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Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Rand » Mon Apr 29, 2013 5:08 pm

dbhguru wrote:Ed,

We have accustomed ourselves to a landscape with small trees as the norm.
It's amazing how quick one can become acclimated too. After spending several weeks running around the redwoods and sequoias, just walking around my local ohio neighborhood was an almost claustrophobic experience. Like walking under some oversized weeds or something.

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Will Blozan
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Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by Will Blozan » Mon Apr 29, 2013 6:21 pm

Rand wrote:
dbhguru wrote:Ed,

We have accustomed ourselves to a landscape with small trees as the norm.
It's amazing how quick one can become acclimated too. After spending several weeks running around the redwoods and sequoias, just walking around my local ohio neighborhood was an almost claustrophobic experience. Like walking under some oversized weeds or something.
Rand,

You must put on your TDI glasses- then the champs are all around us! ;)

Will

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dbhguru
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Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by dbhguru » Mon Apr 29, 2013 8:10 pm

Ed,

Attached is the Photo-Excel analysis as good as I can do it. I made several assumptions, as you'll note, but they support your contention that the 15.5-foot diameter incorporates both stems. I got 15.25' versus their 15.5'. Probably some luck there.

Bob
ridgeway.JPG
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Sycamore-Wabash.xlsx
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Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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edfrank
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Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 5:46 pm

Re: Robert Ridgway article from 1882

Post by edfrank » Mon Apr 29, 2013 9:03 pm

The notes indicate that the tree described below was photographed and may be the one shown above:
( http://www.ents-bbs.org/download/file.php?id=3608 page 74 )
ridgeway2.JPG
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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