Wiredscience old tree gallery

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James Parton
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Wiredscience old tree gallery

Post by James Parton » Fri Mar 19, 2010 8:48 pm

ENTS,

Jerry Coots, a friend and workmate sent me this link on trees of record age. I found it interesting and figured I would share it with the group.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/ ... lery/all/1

Here is the reply I sent to Jerry concerning the link he sent me.


Yerrj,

This is cool. I went through and read the info on these trees. I knew of most of them. However some of the data is debatable. Many, including most of ENTS believe the Senator cypresses age is well overestimated. The tree is in fact hollow which makes accurate ring counts impossible. Will Blozan ( The ENTS president ) installed a lightning cable in the tree a while back. The oldest known tree in the eastern US that has an accurate ring count is a Baldcypress on the Black River near Wilmington NC. It is just over 1, 700 years old.

Also as far as volume, the senator is huge but I doubt it is the eastern recordholder. It is close though. That may belong to one of the south's great Live Oaks or possibly to the Sag Branch Tuliptree in Cataloochee Valley. I have seen the Sag Branch tree and the Angel Live Oak ( Charleston SC ). Both are huge. Also, before HWA killed them they were some huge hemlocks in the GSMNP.

The King Oak is probably overestimated too. Oaks tend to " core rot " at great age. Few exceed 500 years but 1000 is possible. More is doubtful.

James.

P.S. I gotta look that jellyfish up.


I forgot when typing this about some of the huge Sycamores in the Northeast and the great Middleton Oak would have really had some volume before it lost those massive limbs.

Does anyone in ENTS know what the most massive tree in the eastern US is? Not the tallest or largest girth but the greatest volume? I don't think the Senator is it but I could be wrong.

JP
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

Jeroen Philippona
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Re: Wiredscience old tree gallery

Post by Jeroen Philippona » Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:34 am

James,

About the largest volume of any tree in the Eastern USA you can find information on the ENTS website at the pages of the measurement of the Middleton Oak an the Sag Branch tulip tree, done by Will Blozan, Bob van Pelt and others. Before the loss of two branches the Middleton Oak was the largest measured tree in the east with a total volume near 5000 cubic feet; but the Senator is very close. There is somewere a discusion between Will and Bob about its volume, Will probably knows were you can find this on the website. The Sag Branch tulip treeis about 4000 cubes.
The hemlocks were all far below 2000 cubes.

The Danish King Oak is very probable older than 500 years. Heighest ring counts on Quercus robur are now 588 years, but this oak was already totally hollow and very large in the 19th century. Of all oaks in Europe this will be one of the few I think it could be near 1000 years.

Jeroen Philippona

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James Parton
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Re: Wiredscience old tree gallery

Post by James Parton » Sat Mar 20, 2010 8:56 am

Jeroen,

Thanks for the info. I would have thought the Middleton Oak would have been a contender before it lost those two huge limbs. I still would like to get down to Charleston and see it. I have not seen the Senator either but maybe I'll get there one day to check it out too. We are talking about a possible Florida or Mississippi beach trip this summer.

Eastern Hemlock is the largest conifer in the eastern US with Loblolly Pine and White Pine falling in behind.

Hearing the great age of the Danish King Oak makes me think of the possible high claimed ages on some of the Southern Live Oaks. Could they make it to 1000 years or above as some have claimed? They can be fast growers so size alone is not a good indicator and they often have core rot making accurate ring counts impossible. I have not heard Larry Tucei mention any Live Oak being much older than 500-600 years.

JP
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

Jeroen Philippona
Posts: 117
Joined: Thu Mar 18, 2010 11:52 am

Re: Wiredscience old tree gallery

Post by Jeroen Philippona » Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:24 pm

James,

I don't think the big Southern live oaks are older than 300 to 400 or at most 500 - 600 years. They have huge crowns wich give a lot of growth energy. I understand they grow rather fast, cbh increase is normally 3 - 4 cm (about 1½ inch) in a year or even more. So a 30 feet girth can be grown in 300 years. The huge oaks at Oak Alley were planted around 1710, as Larry can affirm. Some live oaks are even a bit bigger, others can have grown slower.
The age of live oaks could be estimated by coring large branches or as with the Middleton Oak ring counting acooky. I think there has been made a cooky of this tree, so I'm still waiting to hear the result.

The Danish King Oak had a cbh of around 14 meter (near 46 feet). Quercus robur doesn't grow as fast as Q. virginiana. Open grown trees depending on soil and precipitation grow 1½ - 3 cm a year. Ruined but still living very old oaks like the King Oak grow slower.

Jeroen

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James Parton
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Re: Wiredscience old tree gallery

Post by James Parton » Sat Mar 20, 2010 9:01 pm

Jeroen,

Thanks for the insight on large old oaks. 46 feet in girth is absolutely huge. I think slightly above even our largest live oaks. Larry could add to this.

ENTS,

Jerry Coots also sent me a link on an immortal jellyfish. I looked it up on wikipedia as well. I know it is not a tree but it may live longer than one!

http://green.yahoo.com/blog/guest_blogg ... nimal.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turritopsis_nutricula

JP
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

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