Poplar/Hemlocks

Discussion of general forest ecology concepts and of forest management practices.

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jamesrobertsmith
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Poplar/Hemlocks

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Mon Mar 15, 2010 5:36 am

It seems that everywhere I once encountered old growth hemlocks I would also encounter old poplars. The term "Poplar-hemlock forests" pop up everywhere I did research when I was trying to locate the old groves of hemlocks to see them before they were all killed off.

What kinds of studies have been done about the interdependency of these two tree species? Is there such? Is there a reason for the dual dominance of these trees in certain areas, or is it just the luck of the draw?

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Steve Galehouse
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Re: Poplar/Hemlocks

Post by Steve Galehouse » Mon Mar 15, 2010 11:41 am

James-
I think both species prefer similar soil/site conditions, and the shade tolerance of the hemlock combined with the tulip-tree's fast growth(producing shade other species don't tolerate) create such an association, but I don't think there is any other interdependency. In my area hemlock and beech form an association, with tulip present but usually not as frequent with hemlock.
Steve
every plant is native somewhere

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Poplar/Hemlocks

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Sun Mar 21, 2010 3:07 pm

Thanks, Steve. I wonder about these things and also of what's going to happen to the old growth groves where hemlocks were such an important part.

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Poplar/Hemlocks

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Mon Mar 29, 2010 9:14 am

Steve Galehouse wrote:In my area hemlock and beech form an association, with tulip present but usually not as frequent with hemlock.

That is how it is in NW PA too.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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