Ice floes battering riparian trees during a thaw

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Ice floes battering riparian trees during a thaw

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Sat Feb 09, 2019 10:19 am

This brief video clip isn't from the Conewango, but from her neighboring watershed to the immediate west in Pennsylvania — Brokenstraw Creek. So it will give you a sense of what is currently going on on the Conewango too. With this week's unseasonably warm temperatures and today's rain, the Brokenstraw was running high and fast with meltwater this evening at Gannon University's Alstadt Environmental Center.

If you've ever been paddling the Conewango (or another river or stream) during the summer and can't figure out what caused all of the mysterious callused, multiple-times-healed-over wounds around the base of the riparian trees, this video provides a vivid demonstration. Watch as ice floes large and small repeatedly batter the base of this unfortunate streamside young birch (Betula spp.) tree in the swift current.

(Apologies for the fuzzy image at times. The camera was evidently struggling to focus in the low-light conditions.)
https://www.facebook.com/ConewangoCreek ... 191797434/

https://www.facebook.com/ConewangoCreekWatershedAssociation/videos/1017206191797434/
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Ice floes battering riparian trees during a thaw

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:42 am

I guess you can't embed Facebook videos here, oh well. Just click directly on the link to see the clip on the Conewango Creek Watershed Association Facebook page.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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