Maryland's effort to restore hemlock forests

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Joe

Re: Maryland's effort to restore hemlock forests

Post by Joe » Fri May 20, 2016 6:09 pm

Gaines said, "Clearly my timberland has special ecological value, and the people I talked to agreed, but, they said, sadly, no funding."

Our nation has a what--- 16 trillion dollar economy? And it can't be willing to spend the money it would take to protect our forests. How sad indeed.
Joe

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Lucas
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Re: Maryland's effort to restore hemlock forests

Post by Lucas » Tue May 24, 2016 12:29 pm

Hemlock is common here outside the bug's range.

https://goo.gl/photos/nnGjzMSYpSodkRcM6

How water tolerate is it? I saw it in swampy areas like the above.

I dug some test pits Sat. to how wet the soil was in a swampy area I plan to plant Q bicolor in this fall. We are in a dry spell so I assume it will be wetter later. The ground supports spruce, fir, and hemlock now. Is it safe to say if they can grow there bicolor will?
Any thoughts on how good this area is for bicolor?
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

Joe

Re: Maryland's effort to restore hemlock forests

Post by Joe » Tue May 24, 2016 1:41 pm

Lucas, it's always a big risk to plant trees. More often than not- they won't survive unless you give them a lot of attention until they're well established- even if it's a tree that ought to do well on that site. I don't know that species so I can't comment on it specifically.

Very wet or very dry sites are particularly risky. On good sites, almost anything will grow- if you give it the needed attention.
Joe

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Maryland's effort to restore hemlock forests

Post by Erik Danielsen » Tue May 24, 2016 2:38 pm

Swamp white oak is pretty tolerant of less than ideal root conditions- the real key is not that it likes wetness, but that its roots tolerate compaction and poor aeration (typical of soils that are flooded often) better than relatives like white oak or chestnut oak. I helped a retired forester plant about a dozen in an old field he was setting up to grow into a forest. He kept them in an area beside his garden for a couple years to allow them to get a bit more robust where they'd have deer protection. As of now they're doing pretty well, and seem pretty low-maintenance compared to a lot of other species.

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DougBidlack
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Re: Maryland's effort to restore hemlock forests

Post by DougBidlack » Wed May 25, 2016 8:26 am

Lucas,

I'd say that hemlock is quite tolerant of wet areas. A few years ago I tried to find every Atlantic White-cedar swamp in eastern Middlesex County in MA by visiting every site labeled as 'conifer wetland'. I found that most of these were dominated by white pines! But they all dried up fairly early and/or the water was moving so it was well oxygenated. I think hemlock wetlands were second most common and I think they are actually more tolerant of wet conditions than white pine but they are just much less common in this part of MA than white pine. Hemlock is one of the more common tree species in Atlantic White-cedar swamps as well as other forested wetlands in this area.

I've planted several swamp white oaks in areas that look similar to your pictures but in southeastern MI. Black, organic soil with water table very high. In these situations swamp white oaks seem to do very well but the wetlands do have to dry out after leaf out. They can tolerate a couple feet of flooding in spring but not all season. What is the source of your swamp white oaks? Your cool climate might be difficult for more southern material.

Doug

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Lucas
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Re: Maryland's effort to restore hemlock forests

Post by Lucas » Wed May 25, 2016 8:46 am

DougBidlack wrote:Lucas,

I'd say that hemlock is quite tolerant of wet areas. A few years ago I tried to find every Atlantic White-cedar swamp in eastern Middlesex County in MA by visiting every site labeled as 'conifer wetland'. I found that most of these were dominated by white pines! But they all dried up fairly early and/or the water was moving so it was well oxygenated. I think hemlock wetlands were second most common and I think they are actually more tolerant of wet conditions than white pine but they are just much less common in this part of MA than white pine. Hemlock is one of the more common tree species in Atlantic White-cedar swamps as well as other forested wetlands in this area.

I've planted several swamp white oaks in areas that look similar to your pictures but in southeastern MI. Black, organic soil with water table very high. In these situations swamp white oaks seem to do very well but the wetlands do have to dry out after leaf out. They can tolerate a couple feet of flooding in spring but not all season. What is the source of your swamp white oaks? Your cool climate might be difficult for more southern material.

Doug

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seed tree along with others

I got the SWO seed about 100 miles from here. Story was it was brought here from MA in the 1800's. The seed coming this fall I hope to get from city trees in Ontario. There is some risk in provenance with that but I hope it is ON native seed.

The spot is question has slope and the water flows but I doubt it dries out much. I planted some in 2013 in the grassy areas that didn't sprout or I didn't find. It is early yet to draw conclusions, though. My suspicion is that they can handle it.

Thx for the info Doug and Erik


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http://www.salicicola.com/photos/gallery/view/1444/1444

http://www.salicicola.com/photos/galler ... canon0555s

If they can handle a cattail marsh they can handle a lot.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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