Investing in National Parks for Our Heritage and Our Economy

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edfrank
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Investing in National Parks for Our Heritage and Our Economy

Post by edfrank » Fri Nov 11, 2011 11:25 am

Made in America
Investing in National Parks for Our Heritage and Our Economy

Made in America

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Download Report http://www.npca.org/park_policy/pdf/Mad ... Report.pdf
(PDF, 3.73 MB, 56 pages)


NPCA has just released a new report on the long-term impact of additional funding cuts on many our most treasured national parks. I hope you will learn more about this important new report and also join us for a live chat about it on Facebook this coming Tuesday, November 15, at noon EST.

Made in America: Investing in National Parks for Our Heritage and Our Economy examines our most challenged national parks at a time when Washington policymakers seek to reduce our national debt.

For the second year in a row, America's national parks face the likely erosion of funding. This will mean fewer rangers to greet us, help us plan our visits, and respond to emergencies. It also means that parks won't be adequately maintained, resources will suffer damage, wildlife will be more vulnerable to poachers, and development threats may increase.

For example, in Everglades National Park, staff is needed to fight exotic wildlife like pythons, fish and the Nile monitor, which eat native species. Further cuts could worsen the situation.

And in Olympic National Park, funding for basic maintenance projects is in short supply and the park must rely heavily on entrance fees to repair trails, replace aging pit toilets, install new picnic tables, and install bear-proof food lockers.

Made in America shows that our national parks are critical to supporting the livelihood of businesses and communities across the country. In fact, they support $13.3 billion in local, private-sector economic activity and 267,000 jobs annually.

Our national parks are economic engines, civic necessities, and sources of American pride and inspiration. During a time of economic hardship, we need to adequately fund the places that protect our American heritage and draw tourists from throughout the world.

http://www.npca.org/park_policy/made-in-america.html

Yellowstone, Gettysburg, the Statue of Liberty and the Flight 93 Memorial are among the many national parks that we, as Americans, own together. Keeping this magnificent collection of places well-managed and open to everyone costs less than 1/13th of one percent of the federal budget— quite a bargain for a park system that inspires visitors from around the world and produces nearly 270,000 private sector jobs across the country.

Yet for the second year in a row, America’s national parks face an erosion of funding necessary to serve the public and protect park resources. And the overall appropriation for the National Park Service (NPS) is nearly $400 million (or 13%) less than it was 10 years ago. Not only will this mean fewer rangers to greet us, help us plan our visits, and respond to emergencies, but it also means that parks won’t be adequately maintained, resources will suffer damage, wildlife will be more vulnerable to poachers, and development threats will increase.

In FY 2011, funding for the National Park Service was reduced by nearly $140 million, including an $11.5 million reduction for operations. In tight budget times, it’s reasonable for the National Park Service to operate frugally. But thrifty operation isn’t enough to keep parks solvent: national parks today receive just 82 cents for every dollar they need to pay for the rangers who are fulfilling the experience of millions of annual visitors and protecting the parks’ treasures. And threats are mounting: according to the recently-enacted Budget Control Act of 2011, if Congress is unable to agree on a level of spending and revenue that reduces the budget, programs from defense to national parks will be subject to a budgetary sequester—which means national park budgets could be cut by as much as 9%.

As this report shows, cuts equal to or even half that amount would be disastrous for many national parks.

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"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Investing in National Parks for Our Heritage and Our Eco

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Fri Nov 11, 2011 8:32 pm

I donate to the National Parks every year. (In addition to paying admission fees.)

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