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Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Posted: Sat Oct 01, 2011 12:23 pm
by RyanLeClair
This may be old news, but here goes:

There are plans underway to begin logging in the giant sequoia groves. According to this plan the very largest specimens will go untouched but trees of medium size will be felled. The park service has thinned out smaller trees in the past but this new plan seems much more drastic. My latest shipment from the Sierra Club informed me of all of this.

If want to help you can either donate to the Sierra Club or contact Tom Vilsack, Secretary of Agriculture.

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Posted: Sat Oct 01, 2011 4:54 pm
by jamesrobertsmith
I'm not surprised. My nephew once told me of a proposal during the Bush administration (he works for DIA) wherein they would allow mining and timber harvests inside the National Parks with plans to "repair" the damage afterwards. This was not a pipe dream, but a serious proposal. My nephew sat in on mid-level discussions while it was being considered.

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Posted: Sat Oct 01, 2011 11:08 pm
by RyanLeClair
God, they are insatiable. Some people really would turn the earth into a lunar landscape for the money. Please JRS, please tell me they did not pass that proposal.

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 5:07 am
by Joe
RyanLeClair wrote:This may be old news, but here goes:

There are plans underway to begin logging in the giant sequoia groves. According to this plan the very largest specimens will go untouched but trees of medium size will be felled. The park service has thinned out smaller trees in the past but this new plan seems much more drastic. My latest shipment from the Sierra Club informed me of all of this.

If want to help you can either donate to the Sierra Club or contact Tom Vilsack, Secretary of Agriculture.

What is their rationale for this work? I thought National Parks couldn't be touched! So they must have some phony baloney rationale- that somehow doing this is going to make the park better or it will protect the best trees.
Joe

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 6:42 am
by PAwildernessadvocate
I am not familiar with the proposal in question, but if Tom Vilsack is the contact person then it must have to do with national forest land, not national park land, as Vilsack is Secretary of Agriculture not Secretary of the Interior.

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:20 am
by KoutaR
I found this:

http://action.sierraclub.org/site/Messa ... d=186801.0
One of California's most treasured landscapes, the Giant Sequoia National Monument, is under threat. The Forest Service has released new management plans for the Monument that include heavy logging of giant sequoia trees. The Sierra Club has proposed an alternative plan in which the ancient forest is recognized for its tourist, recreational, and ecological value and is managed in a similar fashion to a national park. Sierra Club is reaching out to thousands of Bay Area citizens and asking them to attend this hearing and send comments to the Forest Service in order to help save Giant Sequoia National Monument for future generations.
More about the Giant Sequoia National Monument:

http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/sequoia/

Kouta

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:24 am
by Joe
It's crazy that ANY redwoods/sequoias on ANY federal land should be logged. For one thing, the timber industry is in a collapse due to very low demand. There is no shortage of timber to cut all over the country and very little demand- it's not as if it's needed. I'm sure they must have some dumb ass excuse like, "it's for the health of the forest" or "it's to encourage regeneration" or "it's to benefit wildlife". I'll have to dig into this story and see what lame excuse they offer.
Joe

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 1:05 pm
by James Parton
I don't agree with logging on any federal or state owned lands, unless it is trees cut down for the good of the forest as a whole. In other words if the trees would have been cut anyway for another purpose and then the loggers would be more like scavengers. Our government owned forests have been raped long enough. There is probably enough logging done on private lands to keep up the need of the lumber industry.

The top aim for government owned forests should be preservation!

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 2:19 pm
by RyanLeClair
Thank you for the scoop, Kouta. Everyone should see this. Not sure what the rationale is Joe, but you're right, its probably a transparent, bull-s*** reason.

Re: Sequoiadendron and Tom Vilsack

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 2:27 pm
by edfrank
Another petition regarding the Monument

https://secure2.convio.net/sierra/site/ ... on&id=1175

Protect Giant Sequoia National Monument From Logging

Dear [Decision Maker],

I am writing to urge you to use your power to finally bring real protection to the Giant Sequoia National Monument by transferring management from the United States Forest Service to the National Park Service.


Adjacent to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, the Monument was established in 2000 by President Bill Clinton to protect all 327,000 acres of the Giant Sequoia ecosystem in perpetuity. However, since inception, the Forest Service, which still has no plan for how to take care of the Monument, has opened the door to excessive levels of logging.


Under National Park Service management, the Giant Sequoia National Monument will be better protected from the timber industry's relentless push to log inside this threatened ecosystem. Sequoia National Park, right next door to the Monument, has had great success managing the Sequoia ecosystem for decades without harmful logging while also restoring a healthy resilient forest.

It will be a travesty if we allow the timber industry to log throughout the home of most of the giant sequoias left in the world. Now is the time to bring real protection to a national treasure.

The vast majority of Americans strongly support preserving our natural heritage for future generations; Giant Sequoias are among the oldest trees on the planet. Many took root before our great-great grandparents were born, and will live to see our great-great grandchildren -- if we act now. I urge you to use your position to protect the Giant Sequoia National Monument.


Sincerely,
[Your Name]
[Your Address]
[City, State ZIP]