Elwha River Dam Removals begins

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Rand
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Re: Elwha River Dam Removals begins

Post by Rand » Thu May 03, 2012 3:24 am

edfrank wrote:Rand,

What is the source of the photos you just posted yesterday?

Ed
It was the link at the bottom of my original post. Note the silverlight version actually works, the Java and html versions I found too clunky-slow to use.

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Elwha River Dam Removals begins

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Mon May 14, 2012 5:05 pm

Another picture of the sediment plume:


Click on image to see its original size

Taken from this Facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid= ... =1&theater
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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Chris
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Re: Elwha River Dam Removals begins

Post by Chris » Mon May 14, 2012 6:03 pm

Very cool. Another dam down, thousands more to go.

I have spent a few nights camped along the upper Elwha River. Having salmon back up there will only make it better.

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Rand
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Re: Elwha River Dam Removals begins

Post by Rand » Mon May 14, 2012 6:20 pm

It's neat to compare it with an old google earth image and see how much the delta has grown
e-delta.jpg
PA, Thanks for the facebook link, lots of interesting pictures there.

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Chris
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Re: Elwha River Dam Removals begins

Post by Chris » Tue May 15, 2012 11:24 pm

Just by chance, the MODIS image of the day was of the Pacific NW. I noticed you can see the sediment plume on the image too [just go north of the big valley surrounded by snow in the Olympic Mnts]. Not as big as the ones off the Fraser or Columbia Rivers, but still cool.

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Elwha River Dam Removals begins

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Tue Jun 19, 2012 10:25 am

Another cool aerial photo, this one is at the upper dam site (Glines Canyon):


Click on image to see its original size

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid= ... 343&type=1

They haven't completely torn that dam all the way down yet. They are apparently waiting until July to finish the job and release all that sediment.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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Chris
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Re: Elwha River Dam Removals begins

Post by Chris » Sun Jun 24, 2012 5:46 pm

I would imagine they are waiting for the river to drop. They got a lot of snow up there this winter [a SNOTEL site in Elwha basin the Olympics still has 21" of water as snow at 5100 ft] and the river, that usually peaks in early June is above normal.

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Elwha River Dam Removals begins

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Tue Jul 03, 2012 3:54 pm

Yahoo!

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=413425055377021
Here's a look at yesterday's controlled blast at the Glines Canyon Dam. The May-June fish window is over, giving contractors the month of July to lower the dam and reservoir levels before the next fish window begins August 1. Thanks to URS Corps for the video footage.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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edfrank
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Re: Elwha River Dam Removals begins

Post by edfrank » Tue Jul 31, 2012 1:57 pm

Silt from Elwha River dam removal doesn't hang around, say scientists
by GARY CHITTIM / KING 5 News
Bio | Email | Follow: @gchittimK5
Posted on July 26, 2012 at 4:44 PM
Updated Thursday, Jul 26 at 8:14 PM

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Before the historic removal of two dams on the Elwha River, scientists studied all the plant and animal species they could. They wanted to know how a giant plume of silt from the removal project would affect them. Scientists returned to the Elwha Thursday to find out.

PORT ANGELES -- As EPA diver Sean Sheldrake prepares to step into the sediment-filled Strait of Juan de Fuca, he knows the risks that await him.

"Now that the dams have been removed, there is no more 50 feet of horizontal visibility. It's really where the rubber meets the road, as far as this study and dam's removal,” said Sheldrake, whose team is assisting divers and scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey. "We're going to stay close together."

Sheldrake was also here last year helping the USGS explore and document the bottom of the strait where the Elwha River flows out. Since then, the dam removal has sent a massive plume of silt downriver and into the strait. The USGS has spent years studying the area so it can compare and contrast the ecosystem before and after the dam removal.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky


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