Some international scientific recognition for the NTS

General discussions of measurement techniques and the results of testing of techniques and equipment.

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DonCBragg
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Some international scientific recognition for the NTS

Post by DonCBragg » Mon Mar 31, 2014 1:11 pm

While searching a journal recently for some unrelated research articles, I came across the following studies that had been recently published that may be of interest to NTS:

Larjavaara, M. 2014. The world's tallest trees grow in thermally similar climates. New Phytologist 202:344–349. doi: 10.1111/nph.12656

Tng, D.Y.P., Williamson, G.J., Jordan, G.J. and Bowman, D.M.J.S. 2012. Giant eucalypts – globally unique fire-adapted rain-forest trees? New Phytologist 196:1001–1014. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2012.04359.x

(I'm not sure if these are open access or behind the journal's paywall; I found these at work, and we have a government subscription, so I can access them regardless).

While I have some issues with some of the materials presented, that is not why I embarked on writing this post. If you dig deep enough into the supplemental materials, you can find where some of their data comes from...In addition to a few of the more conventional big tree websites, key NTS members are mentioned specifically for their work: Roman Dial and Robert Van Pelt. In addition to these specific mentions, a number of their citations come from the NTS website.

I also followed the link for Australia's big tree website, which pretty much lists the same tree measuring instructions as American Forests (http://www.nationalregisterofbigtrees.c ... rement.php), but they do have at the very bottom of this page a link to a "memorandum" from the Native Tree Society on "measurement issues"--it is Will Blozan's 2004 ENTS tree measuring guidelines PDF! Other tall tree information came from Forestry Tasmania's work with their tall eucalypts--they've been searching for tall trees via a combination of on-the-ground spotting and LiDAR surveys; I couldn't find details for sure, but I believe they use the sine method as their laser measurement tool (see this link for the reference: http://www.forestrytas.com.au/news/2008 ... -centurion).

So, even if we're not seeing much progress with some of the mainstream forest and forestry groups, more and more people are recognizing the value of proper tree measurement! This really goes to show that the NTS mission of collecting accurate tree dimensional data has great utility, and is a mission we must continue with...

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dbhguru
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Re: Some international scientific recognition for the NTS

Post by dbhguru » Wed Apr 02, 2014 7:54 am

Don,

Thanks for the citations and comments. I hope sources of the future will also quote one Dr. Don Bragg.

Your message gives me reason to get back to the Dendromorphometry draft as I keep promising. I've made a virtual career out of the American Forests MGWG, and I hope to adapt much of the advanced material to the Dendromorphometry book that we've agreed to produce. The challenge with MGWG is that there is a big unknown in terms of how far AF is willing to go to update the guidelines. Alas, we're still in the trenches.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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DonCBragg
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Re: Some international scientific recognition for the NTS

Post by DonCBragg » Sat Apr 19, 2014 12:53 pm

I think the science will continue to move ahead, even if AF and other traditionalist foresters/mensurationists continue to choose to follow the "old ways". I'll try to remember to post on a different recent reference on this y'all may get a kick out of...

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dbhguru
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Re: Some international scientific recognition for the NTS

Post by dbhguru » Sun Apr 20, 2014 1:17 pm

Don,

I didn't intend to sound negative. I'm impressed with the progress that we've made in the American Forests initiative. We're moving in the right direction. The prospects are bright. Even if it takes a couple or three of years to implement all the pieces, in the bigger scheme of things, that's pretty quick.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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