The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Reports of NTS Events and Trips for 2011

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edfrank
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7th FOREST SUMMIT, October 13-15, 2011

Post by edfrank » Mon Dec 06, 2010 3:39 pm

7th FOREST SUMMIT 2011

Thursday, October 13, 2011 at 8:00am - Friday, October 14, 2011 at 10:00pm
Holyoke Community College, Holyoke, MA

The Fall 2011 ENTS Rendezvous will be held Saturday October 15, 2010 fro 8:00 am to 11:00 pm.

The program for the 2010 summit can be found here: http://www.nativetreesociety.org/events/summit2010.htm

.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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dbhguru
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Re: 7th FOREST SUMMIT, October 13-15, 2011

Post by dbhguru » Tue Dec 07, 2010 8:54 am

Ed,

Gary and I are already beginning to plan the conference for 2011. Dave Stahle will join us again, as will Lee. Dave participated in the 2007 conference. Unfortunately, I was flat on my back with shingles during that event.

We'll concentrate on science in 2011 even more than 2010. We will seek maximum student participation. Number 7 will be about bringing the best science to the students - the future scientists.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Marcas
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Re: 7th FOREST SUMMIT, October 13-15, 2011

Post by Marcas » Mon Dec 27, 2010 10:43 pm

It's about time for me to go to this grand ENTS Rendezvous, I been wanting to go but found a reason to be busy and not go. Going to put in my vacation time off to go this time plus I never been that far north!
Who speaks for the Trees? WE ALL DO!

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dbhguru
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Re: 7th FOREST SUMMIT, October 13-15, 2011

Post by dbhguru » Tue Dec 28, 2010 3:13 pm

Marcas,

Great. We'll give you the grand tour of MTSF, MSF, and other important tree sites.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Gary Beluzo
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HCC Forest Summit 7/ENTS Rendezvous 2011

Post by Gary Beluzo » Mon Feb 28, 2011 11:26 am

Greetings ENTS and ents,

The 7th Annual HCC Forest Summit is locked in for October 13 (Thursday) and October 14 (Friday) 9:00am - 6:00pm (tentative) both days.
To follow the development of the agenda and support materials please visit www.hcc.edu/forest periodically.

The Annual ENTS gathering will take place October 15 (Saturday) in Charlemont, MA. Details will develop over the next few months.
Mark your calendars!

"See the forest for the trees"

Gary
"..powered in ecological space and evolutionary time.."

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DonCBragg
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Re: 7th FOREST SUMMIT, October 13-15, 2011

Post by DonCBragg » Fri Jun 03, 2011 11:14 am

Count me in! I'll attend both the Forest Summit and the ENTS Rendezvous...

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dbhguru
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Re: 7th FOREST SUMMIT, October 13-15, 2011

Post by dbhguru » Fri Jun 03, 2011 2:48 pm

Don,

Great! We've always got a spot reserved for you. You can speak on any topic you like.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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edfrank
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Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Post by edfrank » Mon Sep 05, 2011 5:29 pm

Forest Summit Presenters 2011
Keynote Speaker

Dr. Frederick L. Paillet
Department of Geosciences
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR
The American Chestnut: Ecology, Devastation and Restoration of a Forest Icon


Just about everyone knows of the tragic loss of an iconic eastern forest tree that once was such a valuable timber source and prolific nut producer for wildlife and humans alike. The chestnut was not just another big forest tree. Its ecology and life history were and still are distinctly different from those of the oaks and beech to which it is distantly related. We start by looking at the Holocene history of chestnut, showing that its peculiar response to climate produced a late Holocene re-organization of New England's forests. Blight arrived in America shortly after 1900 and its spread through the range of chestnut and chinquapin is documented by the release pattern of adjacent trees wherever it grew. The unique qualities of chestnut are further demonstrated by its ability to persist in the forest in the presence of two separate introduced diseases, so that the tree can often dominate the understory without benefit of sexual reproduction. We investigate this phenomenon in detail, and then visit unique stands where chestnut can be seen today as a forest dominant - the West Salem, WI stand where chestnut escaped into native oak hickory forests in a location far beyond the range of blight; and in the unblighted forests of closely related European chestnut in southern Russia. We end with an update on the status of the American Chestnut Foundation program to restore chestnut to its rightful place in our ecosystem.


Dr. Henry W. Art
Robert F. Rosenburg Professor of Biology & Environmental Studies
Williams College
What We Know (and don't know) about an Enigmatic Woodlot


The Robert F. Rosenberg Professor of Biology & Environmental Studies at Williams College, Henry Art has taught biology and environmental studies at Williams College since 1970, when he rejuvenated the Hopkins Memorial Forest as a field research site. His research centers on the impacts of past land uses on the successional patterns, growth rates, and ecosystem functions of a landscape typical of western New England. He is a past chair of the Biology Department and former director of the Center for Environmental Studies at Williams. He also serves on the Williamstown Conservation Commission, the Board of Trustees of the Conway School of Landscape Design, and is the Vice President of the Williamstown Rural Lands Foundation.


Will Blozan
President and Co-Founder of the Eastern Native Tree Society (ENTS)
Liriodendron Tulipifera, King of American Hardwoods


Co-founder and president of the Eastern Native Tree Society (ENTS), Will has been a practicing arborist for over 24 years. He currently owns his own business as an arborist in Black Mountain, North Carolina. His passion for climbing and caring for trees brought him to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in 1993 where he worked on identifying, mapping, and inventorying old-growth forests. It was during this project that he discovered numerous champion trees and developed a fascination with old-growth forests. Will's climbs have helped pioneer arboreal efforts towards the development of precise survey techniques, including the documentation of some of the largest specimens of eastern trees ever recorded. Will Blozan is a living legend. Will has climbed and documented the tallest trees in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and elsewhere for both science and sport. He has been featured in several television documentaries. He was instrumental in adopting and refining techniques of western US canopy researchers, which has allowed the ENTS to introduce three-dimensional crown mapping and volume modeling to eastern trees research. In addition to numerous eastern big/tall tree climbs Will has been assisting world-renowned canopy researchers on projects in the giant sequoias of California.


Don Bragg
Research Forester
USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station
The Role of the USDA Forest Service in Promoting Natural Communities

The southeastern United States is the largest timber producing region in the world, and is poised to retain this position through the ever-increasing use of intensively managed plantations of genetically improved pines, primarily loblolly (Pinus taeda) and slash (Pinus elliottii). While extremely productive from a biomass standpoint, these plantations represent considerably less diverse plant communities with reduced genetic, age, and structural complexity. Pine-dominated stands of natural (seed) origin are not as commercially lucrative but offer a wider range of structural, functional, and compositional attributes that, when coupled with the timber productivity of these forests, may provide a better value in total ecosystem services. The US Forest Service and the University of Arkansas-Monticello are currently evaluating a number of ecosystem functions within these natural origin pine-dominated forests, including carbon storage, fiber production, soil properties, and wildlife habitat, and comparing them to intensively managed pine plantations in the Upper West Gulf Coastal Plain. Preliminary results suggest that some of the productivity elements of naturally regenerated stands are more comparable to pine plantations when not viewed strictly as commercial products (e.g., lumber) but rather as an ecosystem service (e.g., carbon sequestered).


Peter Church
Director of Forest Stewardship, Department of Conservation and Recreation
DCR's role with the tornado and how it affected DCR properties



Lee E. Frelich
Director of the University of Minnesota Center for Forest Ecology
Multiple factors and thresholds for forest change in a warming climate

A warming climate will lead to increasing frequency of storms, drought, fires, and insect outbreaks, as well as alter the influence of invasive species and large herbivores, in the temperate-boreal forest ecotone. These drivers of change will create a number of scenarios for sudden change in forest composition under a gradually warming climate, in some cases by directly exceeding a threshold for a jump to an alternate state and in other cases by opposing change early on, causing stress to build up until the forest system makes a sudden jump.

Lee Frelich is Director of the University of Minnesota Center for Forest Ecology. He received a Ph.D. in Forest Ecology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1986. Frelich teaches courses in Forest Fire Ecology and Landscape Ecology on St.Paul Campus. He has advised 23 graduate students, and is a senior member of the Conservation Biology, Natural Resource Science and Management, Ecology, and Invasive Species Graduate Programs. Frelich has published many papers on forest ecology with 81 coauthors from 10 countries and has been listed among the top 1% of all scientists in the world in the Science Citation Index, Ecology and Environment Category. He has appeared in the news media 300 times including The New York Times, Newsweek, National Geographic, and many TV and radio stations. Current research interests include fire and wind in boreal forests, long-term dynamics of old-growth hemlock and maple forests, invasive earthworms in forests, moose-vegetation relationships, patterns of tree height and global warming.


Sharyl Heller
Massachusetts Friends Network
Are We Making Progress? The Role of the Friends Network



Bob Leverett
Executive Director and Co-Founder of ENTS
Travels to Far Away Places with an Eye on the Trees


Described as the "old growth forest evangelist of the east," Leverett's widespread forest meanderings have led to a large database of tree measurements and an encyclopedic knowledge of the significant remaining forests of the eastern U.S. This evening Bob takes us on a visually stunning tour of the "Great Forests of Massachusetts."

Bob and fellow ENTS co-founder Will Blozan have pioneered tree measuring techniques that have allowed ground-based measurements to be accurate to within a foot of true height. Bob is the President of the Friends of the Mohawk Trail State Forest, the primary architect of the Eastern Old Growth Conference series, and co-organizer of the HCC/ENTS Forest Summit Series. His extensive wanderings throughout the Eastern US have earned him the title "Eastern Old Growth Forest sleuth". Bob's recently published book (coauthored with Bruce Kershner) entitled "Sierra Club Guide to Ancient Forests of the Northeast" will be available at the Forest Summit.


Joan Maloof
Salisbury University, MD
Lessons Learned In Old-Growth Forests


Joan Maloof will be presenting an idea that developed during her visits to old-growth forests in every state east of the Mississippi River. She will be discussing her new book, "Among the Ancients," and her work on the Old-Growth Forest Network. The network will identify one forest in every county, nationwide, which will forever remain unlogged.

The author of "Among the Ancients: Adventures in the Eastern Old-Growth Forests" and "Teaching the Trees: Lessons from the Forest," Maloof has a BS in Plant Science from the University of Delaware, an MS in Environmental Science from the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore, and a PhD in Ecology from the University of Maryland, College Park. She is the coordinator of Champion Tree research for Wicomico County, Maryland, where she lives. Maloof recently retired from teaching Biology and Environmental Studies at Salisbury University to work full time on developing the Old Growth Forest Network. Her books will be available for sale at the conference.


Elizabeth Perry
Wampanoag Nation
Pre-contact and Colonial period views, management techniques, and material culture of Native Americans in Massachusetts


Native American artist and researcher Elizabeth James-Perry will focus her discussion on pre-contact and Colonial period views, management techniques, and material culture involving trees in Massachusetts, the traditional homeland of the Wampanoag, Nipmuc, Pocumtuc and Mahican Native people.


Doug Seale
Environmental Ethics
Framingham State University, MA
Valuing the Environment in America: A Historical Perspective


This presentation focuses on the history of evolving attitudes and environmental values in America. Thoreau, Emerson, John Muir, T. R. Roosevelt, Aldo Leopold, L. H. Bailey, and Rachel Carson, among others, are included. All have contributed greatly to our current understanding of environmental and ecological values and of man's place in nature.

Doug Seale is an independent researcher in environmental ethics, environmental philosophy, and the history of environmental ideas, which are his areas of special interest. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy and teaches Environmental Ethics and other courses at Framingham State University. He is a review advisor for, and frequent contributor of book reviews to, the Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics. He is a former Board Member of the Friends of the Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge, and currently serves as Vice-Chair on the Board of Supervisors for the Middlesex Conservation District


Pat Swain
Natural Community Ecologist, Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program
Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife

NHESP Priority and Exemplary Forested Natural Communities in Massachusetts


The types of forest communities found in Massachusetts and their role in biodiversity conservation is the main focus of the talk at the Forest Summit. Old Growth occurrences of any type of forest community are considered to be exemplary and are tracked by NHESP. In Massachusetts, some forested natural community types are generally uncommon, others are approaching the northern edge of their range here, and a few other types here are near the southern limit of their distributions - and some others are widespread. Using forest types as examples, the talk will cover what natural communities are and how they are classified, and why their identification is an important tool for conservation.
Natural community ecologist at NHESP since 1987, Pat Swain works statewide identifying and describing Massachusetts' rarest and most imperiled natural community types and exemplary examples of common natural community types. She is revising a classification of the natural communities of Massachusetts. Using the classification, NHESP tracks of examples of the Priority and Exemplary natural communities. Natural communities are an integral part of the NHESP effort to protect the biodiversity of Massachusetts through conservation planning, land protection, and public education.


Steve Tilley
Department of Biological Sciences, Smith College
Salamanders in North American Deciduous Forests



Michael Wojtech
Author, Illustrator, Naturalist
Bark: Get to Know Your Trees


In New England trees are a primary part of the landscape, and are accessible to people of all ages in urban, suburban, and rural areas. Knowledge of trees-both their species identities and how they interact with their environment-provides an entryway that helps people connect with their local landscape. And it is often from these local connections that broader knowledge, questions, and concerns arise. The traits most often used to describe tree species-leaves, buds, and twigs-are often not clearly visible or, in the case of leaves, absent more than half the year. Bark is always visible, in any season. But bark is typically considered too complex to distinguish for all but the most practiced observers of trees. I will present a system for identifying the multiple stages of bark appearance for each species, which is detailed in my book, Bark: A Field Guide to Trees of the Northeast, that is accessible to people at all levels of experience. I will also discuss some of the environmental cues that have influenced the evolution of bark's diverse characteristics.

As a naturalist, writer, photographer, and illustrator, Michael Wojtech strives to share the science and beauty of natural history in an accessible and compelling fashion. He began his ongoing study of tree physiology and ecology at Antioch University New England, where he earned his Master's Degree in Conservation Biology. Michael's recently published book, Bark: A Field Guide to Trees of the Northeast, will be available at the Forest Summit. More about his work can be found at http://www.knowyourtrees.com.

.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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edfrank
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Re: The 7th Annual Forest Summit

Post by edfrank » Thu Sep 22, 2011 2:14 pm

forestsummitschedule.jpg
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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tomhoward
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Re: 7th FOREST SUMMIT, October 13-15, 2011

Post by tomhoward » Tue Oct 04, 2011 7:52 pm

ENTS,

My brother and I can't make the Forest Summit 10/13-14, but we should be able to go to the ENTS gathering 10/15. I have a few questions about the event. On 10/15 where in Charlemont do we meet and at what time? Is Mohawk Trail State Forest open for the event? The state website says that Mohawk Trail is closed.

We'll be staying in Holyoke 10/14-16 to look at trees in Northampton and other areas.

Also, we'd like to go to Bryant Woods Sun. 10/16. I understand there is an event there that day. When and where should we meet for the event?

Looking forward to a great time among the trees of New England.

Tom Howard

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