Tamarack as bonsai

Discussions of bonsai trees and growing bonsai trees.

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Steve Galehouse
Posts: 700
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 11:50 pm

Tamarack as bonsai

Post by Steve Galehouse » Tue Mar 09, 2010 9:28 am

I've found tamarack, American larch, to be an excellent subject for bonsai. The foliage is naturally small in scale, the plant is rock-hardy and easily over-winters outdoors, and the seasonal changes make it interesting throughout the year.

Steve
every plant is native somewhere

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Gary Beluzo
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Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 9:17 am

Re: Tamarack as bonsai

Post by Gary Beluzo » Tue Mar 09, 2010 10:29 pm

I've been working with bonsai on a small, informal scale over the past ten years. I purchase most of my pre-bonsai at Bonsai West (http://www.bonsaiwest.com) in Littleton, MA and New England Bonsai (http://www.nebonsai.com) in Belmington, MA. I would be interested in getting more involved, particularly with North American temperate/boreal species. The Montreal Botanical Gardens has very different collections of both Chinese, Japanese, and North American bonsai, well worth the visit.

Steve, what other species have you been working with? Have you done any air layering?

Gary
"..powered in ecological space and evolutionary time.."

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Steve Galehouse
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Re: Tamarack as bonsai

Post by Steve Galehouse » Tue Mar 09, 2010 10:39 pm

Gary-

I think any of the native Vaccinium species would be great Bonsai subjects--V. staminium, deerberry, would be a good one---small foliage, slender branching, nice habit; but I haven't tried it yet. A good project.

Steve
every plant is native somewhere

TN_Tree_Man
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Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2010 7:14 am

Re: Tamarack as bonsai

Post by TN_Tree_Man » Sat Mar 13, 2010 4:43 pm

Steve/Gary:

Have either of you visited the Bonsai exhibit within the National Arboretum in DC? It is worth a visit as is the one located at the North Carolina Arboretum (if either of you work your way South).

Like Gary, I have been working with bonsai at a small, informal scale for about 10 years. I enjoy collecting from the wild and/or propagating for bonsai materials. I seem to have better luck with hardwoods in contrast to conifers. Japanese maples (just about any cultivar) and the smaller-leaf evergreen azaleas have proven themselves for me.

Steve Springer
"One can always identify a dogwood tree by it's bark."

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