European beech forests

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hamadryad
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Re: European beech forests

Post by hamadryad » Tue May 22, 2012 5:04 pm

Our trees are born survivors, and we venerate them for their tenacity, the older and more tenacious they are the more we value them. here is a great veteran from Ashridge Park England
P1000005.JPG

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edfrank
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Re: European beech forests

Post by edfrank » Wed May 23, 2012 9:43 am

Anthony,

Really cool photos! Thanks for posting.

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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edfrank
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Re: European beech forests

Post by edfrank » Wed May 23, 2012 9:43 am

Jill Butler wrote on Facebook:

The people interested in this topic should read Vera - grazing ecology and Forest history. He raises questions about the ecology of shade v light demanding trees in European forests and how they work. The claim for beech climax forest across Europe is hotly debated now.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Chris
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Re: European beech forests

Post by Chris » Fri Jun 01, 2012 10:12 pm

Vaguely related, but IIRC, Stephen Pyne, in his European focused book in the Cycle of Fire series, made a bid deal about the tension, especially in 19th century, about bias against grazing [especially goats] and fire.

hamadryad
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Re: European beech forests

Post by hamadryad » Mon Jun 04, 2012 3:06 am

Inonotus cuticularis
Inonotus cuticularis
Volvalriella bombycina
Volvalriella bombycina
Pholiota aurivella (Golden scaly cap)
Pholiota aurivella (Golden scaly cap)
Helvella lucanosa
Helvella lucanosa
Clavulina coralloides (mycorrhizal)
Clavulina coralloides (mycorrhizal)
Fommes fommentarius
Fommes fommentarius
Hericium erinaceus
Hericium erinaceus
Hericium coralloides
Hericium coralloides
Hericium cirrhatus
Hericium cirrhatus

Beech have the second highest associated bio diverse ecology of our natives (U.K) I go out in search of their associated fungal partners regularly. I am most fortunate to live so close to so many great Beech and Oak woods, Epping Forest, Burnham Beeches, Ashridge Park, Knole house etc. Here are a few more images from our U.K Beechwoods.
Bat roost in hollow Beech, note the brown stain above the hole consisting of moth dust!
Bat roost in hollow Beech, note the brown stain above the hole consisting of moth dust!
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P1140020.JPG
P1130977.JPG
P1130960.JPG
P1130949.JPG
P1130796.JPG

hamadryad
Posts: 26
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Re: European beech forests

Post by hamadryad » Sat Jun 16, 2012 6:31 pm

Corrrr blimey guvnor, its lonely in ere innit!

Heres another beechwood fungi Coprinopsis picaceus
WW 21 9 2010 069.JPG
ww 31 9 2010 361.JPG

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edfrank
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Re: European beech forests

Post by edfrank » Sat Jun 16, 2012 8:22 pm

Anthony,

I find your fungi photos fascinating, I just don't know what to say that would contribute to the discussion.

Ed Frank
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

hamadryad
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2011 1:14 am

Re: European beech forests

Post by hamadryad » Sun Jun 17, 2012 5:32 am

Oh I was just being typically sarcastic in a very north London kind of dry way!

Thanks for the shot inclusion on the ents mag, was chuffed!

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dbhguru
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Re: European beech forests

Post by dbhguru » Sun Jun 17, 2012 6:57 am

Kouta and Anthony,

Great posts. Fabulous photography. I love European beeches. There are many here in Florence and Northampton. I'm thinking about starting a photographic project to capture them. However, on another topic, I'm curious. Where are the wettest places in Europe that you all know of? I've seen some pretty high amounts listed for Europe and Asia Minor. Some may be in the Carpathian Mountains. I never hear of rainforest being associated with Europe, but some of the precipitation amounts meet an old definition for rainforest I remember of 75 inches or more of precipitation fairly evenly spread.

Here in the eastern United States, a few spots reach to 75 inches or more. So far as I know, all are in the Appalachian chain. Some precipitation maps show a small area in the Balsam Mountains as receiving around 100 inches annually, but I think these are projections/extrapolations. Mount Washington, New Hampshire receives an average of 98 inches of precip annually. Several of the official TVA reporting stations in the southern Appalachians receive between 80 and about 86 inches annually. Forest Service Coweeta Station #8 in the Nantahalas of North Carolina receives 93.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Chris
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Re: European beech forests

Post by Chris » Sun Jun 17, 2012 2:26 pm

Evidently, the EEA doesn't want to do decent or current maps, but the highest rainfall places seem to be western Scotland, coastal mountains of Norway and the Dinaric Alps [in the Balkans] with a highest of 183.0”/4648 mm. at Crkvica, Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Of course, including the US values, you most differentiate between "official" [in the US, NCDC], their periods of record, what the normal is based on [entire data record, last 30 years]. So for the eastern US, it looks like Lake Toxaway, NC wins for official stations with 92" for the 1970-2000 climate period.

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