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New disease could wipe out English oak

Posted: Fri Apr 30, 2010 10:45 am
by edfrank
New disease could wipe out English oak

Acute Oak Decline is on the increase.

http://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/en/why- ... sease.aspx

The disease causes the oak tree to bleed and can kill it within five years.

To date there are 55 confirmed cases across southern and eastern England and the Midlands and experts say if we don't act now the consequences could be severe.
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Peter Goodwin of Woodland Heritage says the disease "has the potential to change our landscape even more than Dutch Elm Disease".

Acute Oak Decline affects both the UK's native oaks - pendunculate and sessile. Forest owners and managers are worried that a lack of understanding of how the disease spreads means it will be hard to control.

Full Article: http://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/en/news ... cline.aspx

Acute Oak Decline - Overview http://www.forestry.gov.uk/fr/INFD-7UL9NQ

Re: New disease could wipe out English oak

Posted: Sun May 02, 2010 11:16 am
by dbhguru
Ed,

That is awful news. The English oak has been the very symbol of strength and durability over the centuries. What a tragedy if it disappears. However, with globalization, there is no way to prevent the spread of alien fungi. In the end, it will become all too obvious that the greatest disease-parasite on the planet is humans. We're a freaking disaster.

Bob

Re: New disease could wipe out English oak

Posted: Mon May 03, 2010 11:57 am
by Jeroen Philippona
Ed and Bob,

This indeed is horrible news. English oak is easily the most important tree in the UK and the Netherlands and one of the most important trees in landscape and forests in most NW and middle European countrees. In Holland I've seen one oak with comparable bleeding woonds along a street two years ago, because it was dying it was cut. Also it is my favorite tree, I hope this disease will not be as disastrous as Dutch Elm Disease or Chestnut blight and that there are ways to stop it.

We have a comparable bacterial bleeding disease since about 6 years on Horse Chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), wich is only native in the south east of Europe but is very important as an ornamental tree all over Europe now. Thousands of trees have died because of this, but at the moment it seems not to be as agressive as in the first few years: mostly trees wich have a high level of stress such as in urban situations are affected. A lot of research is done on what is the origin and how to treat it, but not yet with much result.

Jeroen Philippona

Re: New disease could wipe out English oak

Posted: Fri May 07, 2010 10:22 am
by Larry Tucei
ENTS, I agree with you Bob, globalization is the worst thing that has happened in our lifetime! Again lack of Government research funds needed to help the English Oak was not available. Sounds like our Govt! What a tragedy! If these disease's keep up we won't have any trees for our children! Larry

Re: New disease could wipe out English oak

Posted: Tue May 22, 2012 4:47 pm
by hamadryad
Its a shame that our organisations havent acknowledged the real cause of the decline in oaks, nitrification and weakening of the tree species specific relationships.

Industry/agriculture is the main cause of these issues, these things are merely symptoms of a much bigger issue, our soils are whats REALLY sick

Re: New disease could wipe out English oak

Posted: Tue May 22, 2012 8:10 pm
by AndrewJoslin
Ironically Quercus robur is behaving like an invasive along coastal woods in Rhode Island, it's doing very well! Oh well, globalization strikes again.
-AJ

Re: New disease could wipe out English oak

Posted: Tue May 22, 2012 9:29 pm
by Rand
The article says the current suspicion is focused on a bacterial cause, but jeez that looks eerily similar to the sudden oak death killing oaks (Phytophthora ramorum) out in california.

hamadryad wrote:Its a shame that our organisations havent acknowledged the real cause of the decline in oaks, nitrification and weakening of the tree species specific relationships.

Industry/agriculture is the main cause of these issues, these things are merely symptoms of a much bigger issue, our soils are whats REALLY sick
I'm not familiar with what you are referring too. Any further details, links etc?

Re: New disease could wipe out English oak

Posted: Tue May 22, 2012 9:33 pm
by Steve Galehouse
NTS-

I hope this disease doesn't reach North America; if Quercus robur is susceptible, it's likely all native members of the Leucobalanus section of Quercus are as well--white, bur, swamp white, chestnut, chinkapin, basket, etc. This would be even worse than emerald ash borer.

Steve

Re: New disease could wipe out English oak

Posted: Wed May 23, 2012 8:15 am
by TN_Tree_Man
The article says the current suspicion is focused on a bacterial cause, but jeez that looks eerily similar to the sudden oak death killing oaks (Phytophthora ramorum) out in california.
Rand--this is my reaction as well. The pics look like Sudden Oak Disease to me as well. A lot of nursery stock (particlulary rhododendrons) from the west coast is on quarantine to assist in limiting the spread of sudden oak death this side of the Mississippi River.

Steve Springer

Re: New disease could wipe out English oak

Posted: Fri May 25, 2012 4:56 pm
by hamadryad
what i was suggesting is that, and certainly with Phytopthoras, is that the issues are in lost mycorrhizae associations and a lack of biodiversity within the soil food webs, along with changing climate causing range to be challenged for some species (north drift to cooler climes) leading to a more weakened stock of trees, trees just dont thrive without their associated organisms, especially the ecto-mycorrhizal associating Oaks, Beeches, Larches, Pines etc.

The Oak has the most diverse suite of host specific symbiont's in the British isles and saprobes etc, in a healthy system I believe these Oaks would not be falling foul of such issues as Phytopthoras.

Personally the biggest threat to the native oaks Q petrea and robur is hybridisation with Q. cerris and maybe other species of imported oak. I received some very special chited acorns from windsor to nurture recently, they come from an ancient English Q. robur and I have been very surprised by their leaf shape colour and stem being VERY red/wine coloured these are ancient genes of that i am certain, I am very much looking forward to seeing them grow on into fine trees.

one is destined for Hever castle, i have some other sites to find and a few to confirm for a home for each of these rare and majestic true english Oaks, I will take some photographs tommorow.

I havent seen these symptoms in any of the woods I visit in the south east of england (ancient woodland) and all the images I see are of forest timber silva situations contexts, this only re affirms my views on biodiversity and soil health being a key in tree health and vitality.