Howdy from East TN

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EmoryRiver
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2012 3:04 pm

Howdy from East TN

Post by EmoryRiver » Sun Dec 30, 2012 3:21 pm

My name is Hugh and I grew up following my father around Tennessee timber tracts.

I enjoy keeping a list of species I have found on our timber tracts and measuring some of the big boys I stumble across.

I imagine this has been discussed previously but was wondering what the tallest tree in Tennessee or the East is? I think I've got a few White Pines that might be contenders.
Thanks for the info!

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edfrank
Posts: 4217
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 5:46 pm

Re: Howdy from East TN

Post by edfrank » Sun Dec 30, 2012 3:37 pm

Hugh,

Welcome to the Native Tree Society. I am wondering how you are measuring your tree heights? For your information the tallest current tree, based upon the most recent measurement is a tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera) on Fork Branch in GSMNP in western NC at 191.9 feet. The second tallest currently is the Boogerman white pine at 188.9 feet, although that reading is perhaps four years old. These are both laser rangefinder/clinometer and tape dropped measurements, so they are accurate. At one time the Boogerman pine was measured at 207 feet by cross-triangulation. I look forward to hearing more about your big trees. We don't have a member who is active from your area.

Edward Frank
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

EmoryRiver
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2012 3:04 pm

Re: Howdy from East TN

Post by EmoryRiver » Sun Dec 30, 2012 3:55 pm

I just use a Suunto handheld clinometer and could be off, but we have several pockets of white pines in a few drainages that I measured at 165-185. I have only measured a couple in one of these stands. I would love advice on more accurate measuring and would be happy to show anyone the trees to get better numbers if mine are off. Thanks for the info, these are relatively young pines under 100 years old.

-Hugh

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dbhguru
Posts: 4568
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Howdy from East TN

Post by dbhguru » Thu Jan 03, 2013 6:07 pm

Hugh,

The measurement guidelines on the NTS website discuss the primary ways to measure tree height. You really need a laser rangefinder to go with your clinometer. Also, a scientific calculator is a must. With those three instruments you can measure tree height using the sine method. I presume that when you mentioned that you used only a clinometer you also had a tape to lay out a baseline from the point of measurement to the tree being measured.

What scales do your clinometer have, e.g degrees and percent slope? If you ca give us more information on exactly how you performed your measurements, we can help you fine tune the process.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

EmoryRiver
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2012 3:04 pm

Re: Howdy from East TN

Post by EmoryRiver » Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:39 pm

The clinometer I use is based on a linear/flat line distance from the tree of 66 feet. For tall trees I measure out 132 ft (with tape) then double my dial reading for results. I understand there is room for error and 10 feet of error would be very easy to have.

I know they are tall trees, I just don't know exact heights, and still seem to be growing well especially bottomland groves.

I am confident on a few 160-170' trees around and I am curious about a couple that seem a bit higher 180+-

I am happy to show anyone the trees and would love any advice on more accurate measurements. Thanks

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