Mick Jett, a novelist

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MickJ
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Mick Jett, a novelist

Post by MickJ » Mon May 28, 2012 6:28 am

Hi, I'm Mick Jett, a novelist who might be of some help in getting the book project going. My own book, originally entitled The Birthing Tree but changed by publishers to the more marketable title of Knowing Daniel was published in mid-April.

http://www.martinsisterspublishing.com/?page_id=1262

Although it's fiction, it's based solidly on facts and one of the inspirations for the book is based on the existence of an ancient tulip oak which still rises on the eastern edge of McMinnville, TN, on Sparta Street there. The time frame is the early 19th Century when wagon trains bumped along the Kentucky Trail. The pioneers paused beneath the huge limbs of the birthing tree where pregnant women could be delivered of their babies in relative comfort. The tree was also the center piece of the pioneer campground where wagons were repaired, relatives and other travelers joined the caravans and stock watered in the nearby streams.
jett.jpg
Daniel West, whose surname is changed to Burns in the novel, was a prominent citizen and young veteran of the War of 1812. He loved wood of all types and was a master cabinetmaker. Shortly after the war ended he married a young woman who was supposedly a widow. Her trapper husband was presumed dead after a conflict with Cherokees. However, he returned to McMinnville and reported that he had been forced to become a warrior for the Cherokees to replace on of them he had slain in battle. It was a common practice. By his proved valor in battle, he was released to rejoin his wife.

Daniel's wife chose to rejoin her first husband and Daniel left his spacious house and carved a room in a living giant poplar. Although known as a hermit, he remained sociable and rode about McMinnville on the back of a British white steer. He continued to conduct business in that odd manner.

My book's characters, most of the based on actual individuals, do not cause major events of the time nor do they change the outcome. It's available for order in all book stores and on Amazon.
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tsharp
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Re: Mick Jett, a novelist

Post by tsharp » Mon May 28, 2012 7:37 am

Mick: I have never heard a tree described as a tulip Oak. What is it?

TN_Tree_Man
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Re: Mick Jett, a novelist

Post by TN_Tree_Man » Mon May 28, 2012 9:31 am

Mick,

You mean a White oak (Quercus alba) http://tufc.com/registries.html.

Turner--I think the "tulip oak" is one of those new hybrids that is currently the rave! :)

Steve Springer
"One can always identify a dogwood tree by it's bark."

MickJ
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Re: Mick Jett, a novelist

Post by MickJ » Mon May 28, 2012 11:39 am

There are only two species of Liriodendron in the world. Both are in the magnolia family and have flowers that resemble tulips. One is characteristic of oak-tulip tree forests in the eastern U.S (Liriodendron tulipifera), the other is native to China (Liriodendron chinense). In these eastern U.S. forests, tulip trees and white pine are the largest trees. They can grow rather tall (60 to 90 feet and sometimes up to 150 feet) and very rapidly. Due to this quality, Native Americans made dugout canoes from tulip tree trunks. You might want to check out these photos of a forest brimming with tulip oaks at: http://www.ents-bbs.org/posting.php?mod ... =18&t=4143

I am fascinated by trees but I am no expert. However, one of my sources for the birthing tree mentioned in Knowing Daniel was the head librarian at Magness Library in McMinnville, TN, who also mentioned to me that he and his family are highly knowledgeable about trees.

Wikipedia, a fine but often unreliable source, mentions only the tulip oaks of rainforests and those in Australia.

MickJ
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Re: Mick Jett, a novelist

Post by MickJ » Mon May 28, 2012 11:45 am

Sorry, that link probably didn't work. Try this one for a look at some tulip trees in a forest:

http://www.acris.nynhp.org/guide.php?id=9985

.

MickJ
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Re: Mick Jett, a novelist

Post by MickJ » Mon May 28, 2012 12:19 pm

It seems this is not a new topic for native tree society. Steve, on this site the tree is referred to only as a white oak.http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldt ... lle_tn.htm

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edfrank
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Re: Mick Jett, a novelist

Post by edfrank » Mon May 28, 2012 9:29 pm

Mick,

I am thinking there was a bit of confusion abut the oak-tulip forests. Oak-tulip is not a kind of a tree. It is a designation for the two most dominant trees in a particular type of forest. There are Oak Trees - likely several species of oaks and there are tuliptrees (Liriodendron tulipifera) that are the major species in that type of forest. Other examples are Oak-Hickory Forests, Maple-Beech-Birch, etc. Here are some examples http://forestry.about.com/od/forestreso ... r_Type.htm

Edward Frank

.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

MickJ
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Re: Mick Jett, a novelist

Post by MickJ » Sat Aug 11, 2012 11:48 pm

Frank, thanks for links and the facts.
The more facts I find on this site, the more of a novice I find myself to be. It's too late to change the references to "tulip oak" in my novel. My source for that term was the head librarian in the area which is used as the scene in book. His family has been in the timber business for generations and he seemed quite knowledgable about trees.
For those who might be traveling through middle Tennessee this summer, I suggest they stop by McMinnville and view the mighty Birthing Tree, which I will now hedge and simply call it an oak, and read the plaque which touches on its history. During the late 18th century and early 19th pioneers would pause under its great branches on their westward journeys.

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Mick Jett, a novelist

Post by Larry Tucei » Mon Aug 13, 2012 3:05 pm

Mick, A beautiful White Oak with some interesting stories about great tree. Reported to be 200 years old. http://www.usgennet.org/usa/tn/county/w ... -tree.html http://www.mcminnville-tn-heritage.org/page0002.htm Welcome to NTS. Larry

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