old growth video?

The philosophy and techinques of shooting video. Discussions of equipment, editing, and software. Videos meant to document a specific tree or site should be place in te proper section of the trip reports section.

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

Joe

old growth video?

Post by Joe » Sun Apr 19, 2015 5:05 am

I've recently switched my Netflix subscription from disks to streaming and I love it- I've discovered countless nature videos of all sorts. One of the best is a relatively new series. I just watched one called "Wild Iberia"- there quite a few of these from all over the planet. They are all HD and use neat tricks like time lapse with panning.

Watching these got me thinking that it would be very cool to see a professionally made video about old growth forests. It could show the best of the best from across America- presented by NTS members, of course. The narrator would explain why the protection of old growth forests is extremely important. Perhaps PBS would be interested in this- or the entity that made the Wild series I mention above.

If any NTS member has a contact with such a professional video enterprise- he/she could broach the subject.
Joe

User avatar
John Harvey
Posts: 747
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 8:25 pm

Re: old growth video?

Post by John Harvey » Sun Apr 19, 2015 8:58 am

Sadly outside of that one Nat Geo special on redwoods, I don't know of any great tree documentaries. Millions upon millions of animal shows and one tree video. Unless you count the treehouse maker shows.
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

User avatar
RayA
Posts: 209
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 10:21 am

Re: old growth video?

Post by RayA » Sun Apr 19, 2015 5:33 pm

C'mon Joe, let's hit the woods with our cameras and do it ourselves!

Joe

Re: old growth video?

Post by Joe » Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:19 am

RayA wrote:C'mon Joe, let's hit the woods with our cameras and do it ourselves!
If I could afford to retire- and if I could afford professional equipment- and if I could afford to travel around the country- I'd be happy to do it. Oh, and if I had the talent- which I don't....

I do though have a vision of how such a video should look- so, if I had money to blow, or a grant, I'd direct the production, by a professional crew. If you look at the credits on really good nature shows, they have teams of people- like a Hollywood production.

I'm sure we amateurs could come up with something- but I really would love to see a professionally made video- a world class video about old growth forests and specimen trees.
Joe

Joe

Re: old growth video?

Post by Joe » Mon Apr 20, 2015 8:15 am

And, of course, the video would include Bob Leverett giving a TED talk--- er, uh... a BOB talk about why protecting old growth is extremely important!
Joe

User avatar
Rand
Posts: 1216
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 9:25 pm

Re: old growth video?

Post by Rand » Mon Apr 20, 2015 9:47 am

There is a series you can find on Youtube called 'Forest China' thats all about the different forest types in china. I watched a couple, but it feels a little flat somehow. I think they just had less interesting footage to fill 45 minutes than you typically see.

User avatar
KoutaR
Posts: 666
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 3:41 am

Re: old growth video?

Post by KoutaR » Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:18 am

Indeed, it would be nice to see a professionally made video on old-growth forests. I guess forest is too boring for most people. Even animals seem to be too boring for many people as many documentaries show researchers’ interviews half of the time. European nature documentaries often show traditional human cultures half of the time.

I think you NTS people could produce an amateur youtube video on old-growth forests. It would work like this:
  • A youtube account is created (e.g. “OldGrowthOfAmerica”).
  • All the participants get the password in a private message or e-mail. The password should not be published online. Only members of the NTS or people known by them should be accepted as participants so that nobody can sabotage the project.
  • One member, preferably with experience in video editing, is chosen as editor.
  • The participants upload their video clips into the youtube account and give the data on the locations, tree species etc. to the editor.
  • The editor compiles the final video from the clips. The participants give permission to the editor to edit and cut their clips as he likes. The editor also has right to reject clips if they don’t fulfil the quality requirements. Other participants refrain from editing the video. The editor may also add narration or music.
The project could be delayed by a year, for example, so that the members have time to shoot more videos particularly for this project. The tree measurers often hike when trees are leafless but summer sceneries should also be included in the video.

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4467
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: old growth video?

Post by dbhguru » Mon Apr 27, 2015 7:02 am

Kouta,

Your idea has merit and the steps you've laid out make sense. Very clear. Thanks for presenting it. But I have the same suspicion that you do, i.e. people aren't that interested in the subject. We are living in the age of instant gratification. Slow moving documentaries on trees would have very narrow appeal. Still, it is a project worth discussing.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

Joe

Re: old growth video?

Post by Joe » Mon Apr 27, 2015 7:09 am

Kouta, I think your suggestion has merit- but, I think the problem of forests being boring to so many people is that they don't yet know that forests are not boring and that would be the objective of a professionally made video. I've now seen some extraordinary nature documentaries made in recent years. Now, how to make a documentary about things like trees that don't move certainly will be a challenge. To get video professionals, who don't know much about forests, excited about the subject, especially old growth forests, will take a good deal of missionary work to turn them on to the subject- once that happens, they'll figure out how to make a thrilling video that will show just how magnificent the great forests are- and, how important, not just because big trees are nice to look at- but because of all the other values we associate with big trees and old growth forests. Something to ponder....

I really like what can be done with high definition- especially when produced with professional cameras. I saw a video of the ocean done with a fantastic camera with a lens several feet wide- it costs hundreds of thousands of dollars- and it took 4 scuba divers to just move it around, after it was dropped into the sea with a crane. The detail you can see is astounding, far better than you'd see if you were in the water.

And, now we're soon going to be seeing beyond high definition with 4K video- with four times the resolution. I saw a 4K television at a Best Buy store recently. It was showing video of cities and landscapes- you couldn't take your eyes off it.

If a video was made to such professional level- with a good narrator who can discuss why old growth forests are so extremely valuable (somebody like Bob Leverett)- I think the video could have a great effect on policies to protect such forests.

We need to discuss this with PBS or the BBC.
Joe

User avatar
KoutaR
Posts: 666
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 3:41 am

Re: old growth video?

Post by KoutaR » Mon Apr 27, 2015 12:02 pm

Bob & Joe,

I did not mean the amateur youtube video as a substitute for a professional-made movie. I agree that it really needs professional equipments and skills to get the public interested. The youtube video would be same kind of activity as this BBS, for a small target group of forest fanatics. It would certainly not get thousands of likes. The editor/director would have to invest a lot of time for editing the video, for the other participants it would be only the upload.

Kouta

Post Reply

Return to “Video Production”